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2017-06-06 ...
  • June 6-8, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 14-16, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2017-04-06
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2017-04-05 ...
  • April 5-6, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 3-4, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
As diesel engines become more popular, a fundamental knowledge of diesel technology is critical for anyone involved in the diesel engine support industry. This course will explain the fundamental technology of diesel engines starting with a short but thorough introduction of the diesel combustion cycle, and continue with aspects of engine design, emission control design, and more. An overview of developing technologies for the future with a comprehensive section on exhaust aftertreatment is also included. The text, Diesel Emissions and Their Control, authored by Magdi Khair and W. Addy Majewski is included with the seminar.
2017-04-05 ...
  • April 5-7, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • September 27-29, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The need to control emissions and maintain fuel economy is driving the use of advanced turbocharging technology in both diesel and gasoline engines. As the use of diesel engines in passenger car gasoline and diesel engines increases, a greater focus on advanced turbocharging technology is emerging in an effort to reap the benefits obtained from turbocharging and engine downsizing. This seminar covers the basic concepts of turbocharging of gasoline and diesel engines (light and heavy duty), including turbocharger matching and charge air and EGR cooling, as well as associated controls.
2017-04-05
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2017-04-05
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-04-05
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2017-04-05
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1089
Jose Grande, Julio Abraham Carrera, Manuel Dieguez Sr
Exhaust Gas Recirculation system (EGR) has been used for years for NOx emissions control in commercial vehicle applications. Emissions limits are tighter with every regulation while durability requirements are increasing, so EGR systems manufacturers must be able to provide high performance and robust designs even with high thermal loads. Commercial vehicle market is characterized by lower production rates than passenger car programs, but same engine has multiple applications with totally different engine calibrations. In some cases it is necessary to design two or more EGR systems for an engine platform, with the consequent impact on cost and development timeline. The optimal design of and EGR system needs to take into consideration several topics related with performance and durability: efficiency and pressure drop, fouling, boiling, thermal fatigue, vibrations, pressure fatigue and corrosion among others.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1086
Cagri Sever, Todd Brewer, Scott Eeley, Xingfu Chen, Ruichen Jin, Emad Khalil, Michael Herr
For aluminum automotive cylinder head designs, one of the concerning failure mechanisms is the thermo-mechanical fatigue from changes in engine operating conditions. After an engine is assembled, it goes many different operating conditions while it is cold and during the warmed up condition. Strain alternation from the variation in engine operation conditions change may cause thermo-mechanical failure in combustion chamber and exhaust port. Integrated exhaust manifold heads are especially exposed to this failure mode due to the length and complexity of the exhaust gas passage. First a thermo-mechanical fatigue model is developed to simulate a known dynamometer thermal cycle and the corresponding thermo-mechanical fatigue damage is quantified. Additionally, strain state of the cylinder head and its relation to thermo-mechanical fatigue are discussed. For field risk assessment, the customer usage profiles are analyzed and corresponding duty cycles are built.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1083
Chawin Chantharasenawong
This study focuses on achieving a lower overall lap time at SAE Formula Student competition through a modification to the standard intake system. The lower lap time is achieved by widening the range of engine RPM which produces torque higher than 90% of the maximum value and lowering the engine RPM corresponding to the maximum torque. An intake system with ‘variable runner length’ is introduced to the 2015 racecar of KMUTT team. The values of intake lengths are determined from the wave equation with the goal of producing over 90% of the maximum torque of the baseline configuration over a range of engine RPM. Computer simulations are performed to determine the pressure at engine entry at various runner lengths. Finally, a prototype variable runner length intake system with linear motor actuators is constructed and installed on the racecar. Chassis dynamometer tests are performed to determine the engine torque for 3,000 – 10,500 RPM at all interested runner lengths.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1087
Pengfei Zang, Zhe Wang, Yu Fu, Chenle Sun
The Linear Internal Combustion Engine-Linear Generator Integrated System (LICELGIS) is different from conventional crank-based engine for reducing frictional losses by eliminating the crankshaft. Thus, the LICELGIS piston stroke is not constrained geometrically and the system compression ratio is variable. During steady-state operation, the LICELGIS converts the fuel chemical energy into electric power with piston assembly reciprocating motion, which can for example be used as a range-extender in hybrid electric vehicles. The LICELGIS scavenging process is prerequisite and key for the system steady-state operation, which has remarkable influence on mixture gas and, eventually, on engine combustion performance. In order to achieve high scavenging performance, a LICELGIS is investigated in this paper. The LICELGIS motion characteristics and scavenging process were analyzed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1077
Nicolas Arnault, Nicolas BATAILLEY, Arnaud MARIA, Laurent BECHU
PSA Group, SOLVAY and SOGEFI have teamed-up to produce the first Plastic Diesel Fuel Filter fully made of recycled polyamide 66, ready for mass-production. This has been achieved by using the brand new plastic compound developed by SOLVAY Engineering Plastics. This material is 100% recycled from airbag wastes, providing a premium material able to stand demanding applications requirements supplied though circular economy, which is quite unusual in automotive industry yet. SOGEFI has tested this material through its existing plastic injection process, and tested the parts on extensive bench validation tests. It confirmed that this material is fully compatible with standard injection process, and that all the tests have been passed successfully. Finally, PSA Group has driven the choice of the tested parts: DV engine 1.6l Euro6b application, homologated the material grade and evaluated the whole validation process.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1076
Mohammad Moetakef, Abdelkrim Zouani, Esra Demren
Engine and transmission oil pumps are one of the primary sources of tonal noise or whine inside the vehicles. The whine is specially a cause for NVH concern during vehicle coast down when the engine background noise acting as sound masking for the whine is decreasing. To prevent and/or reduce the risk of oil pump-induced tonal noise, upfront NVH evaluation of the oil pump is required. Through analytical CAE approach oil pump pressure pulsations corresponding to different orders of the pump can be evaluated. And modifications to the oil pump design can be studied in order to reduce the pressure peaks and/or breaking down the peaks over their frequency spectrums to introduce self-masking effect. In this presentation, a couple of CAE case studies addressing oil pump-induced whine in an I4 during coast down along with test data are reviewed. The studied pump is of a variable displacement vane type.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1082
Mohammed Yusuf Ali, Thomas Sanders, Mikhail A. Ejakov, Reda Adimi, Alexander Boucke, Jochen Lang, Gunter Knoll
Strict requirements for fuel economy and emissions are the main drivers for recent automotive engine downsizing and an increase of boosting technologies. For high power density engines, among other design challenges, valve and guide interactions are very important. Undesirable contact interactions may lead to poor fuel economy, engine noise, valve stem to valve guide seizure, and in a severe case, engine failure. In this paper, the valve stem and valve guide contact behavior is investigated using computational models for the camshaft drive in push and pull directions under several misalignment conditions for an engine with roller finger follower (RFF) valvetrain and overhead cam configuration. An engine assembly analysis with the appropriate assembly and thermal boundary conditions are first carried out using the finite element solver ABAQUS.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1038
Tomasz Lukasz Duda, Ramkumar Vijayakumar, Calogero Avola, Richard Burke, Colin Copeland
Turbocharger compressor performance maps are important characteristics in engine-turbocharger matching process. The low mass flow limit on those maps is marked by surge line but since there is no standardized recommendation for measuring surge, various metrics exist among turbocharger suppliers. This paper focuses on an experimental surge measurement and is carried out on a small size fixed geometry turbocharger tested in hot conditions on a steady-state gas stand developed at University of Bath. Hard surge is approached by maintaining constant turbocharger speed and closing the compressor backpressure valve gradually. The high frequency data is recorded at several operating points at each speed line and in the region of mild surge whereas the last point denotes hard surge. The first part of the study informs on the selected instrumentation by means of pressure transducers, thermocouple and free-field microphone.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1034
Ben zhao, Liangjun Hu, Harold Sun, Abraham Engeda
As the variable nozzle turbine (VNT) becomes an important element in engine fuel economy and engine performance, improvement of turbine efficiency over wide operation range is the main focus of the research efforts for both the academia and industry in the past decades. It is well known that in a VNT, the nozzle endwall clearance has big impact on the turbine efficiency, especially at small nozzle open positions. However the clearance at hub and shroud wall side may contribute differently to the turbine efficiency penalty. When total height of nozzle clearance is fixed, varying distribution of nozzle endwall clearance at hub and shroud sides is possible to generate different patterns of the clearance leakage flow that has different interaction with and impact on the main flow after exiting the clearances.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1041
Ahsanul Karim, Robert Wade, Anthony Morelli, Keith Miazgowicz, Brian Lizotte
The Single Sequential Turbocharger (SST) used in Ford’s 6.7L Scorpion Diesel is analyzed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to draw conclusions about the compressor stability at low mass flows. The SST compressor concept consists of a double-sided wheel which flows in parallel fed by two separate inlets (front and rear), followed by a single vane-less diffuser, and a volute. CFD simulations for the full stage are performed at low mass flow rates. The compressor wheel has ten full blades on each side and both sides have ported shroud casing-treatment (CT) in the inlet region. An objective of the analysis is to determine the compressor side (front or rear on the double-sided wheel) that suffers flow break down first as the mass flow is reduced, and its impact on the overall stability of the SST compressor. Another objective is to better understand the interactions between the compressor inlet flow and the flow through the casing-treatment.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1037
Christoph Haidinger, Wolfgang Kriegler, Adrian Millward-Sadler, Philipp Eder
This paper deals with an improved design of a pressure wave supercharger for small recreational vehicles like motorbikes or snowmobiles. A pressure wave supercharger (PWS), commonly known as Comprex (or Hyprex), provides very good torque response behavior and is used to lower emissions. However, compared to a standard turbocharger system, a standard PWS system has some inherent disadvantages too. Main problems are noise emissions and the expensive manufacture. Therefore, the goal of this study is to eliminate these shortcomings and to propose a completely new design which promises easy and relatively inexpensive production. In this paper, the conceptual development of a new PWS type is presented. Methods used were computational fluid dynamics simulations and the analysis of an existing Comprex design. High attention has been paid to the producibility of the aggregate. Though there are big design differences compared to a standard PWS, the working principle per se remains the same.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1040
Bertrand Kerres, Mihai Mihaescu, Matthieu Gancedo, Ephraim Gutmark
The compressor surge line of automotive turbochargers can limit the low-end torque of an engine. In order to determine how close the compressor operates to its surge limit, the Hurst exponent of the pressure signal has recently been proposed as a criterion. The Hurst exponent quantifies the fractal properties of a time series and its long-term memory. This paper evaluates the outcome of applying Hurst exponent based criterion on time-resolved pressure signals, measured simultaneously at different locations in the compression system. Experiments were performed using a truck-sized turbocharger on a cold gas stand at the University of Cincinnati. The pressure sensors were flush-mounted at different circumferential positions at the inlet of the compressor, in the diffuser and volute, as well as downstream of the compressor.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1044
Chao Cheng, Akintomide Akinola
Improving engine efficiency and reducing the total cost of ownership demands engine friction loss reduction through optimal design, especially for large bore application considering the amount of fuel the engine consumes during its service life. Power cylinder is a big source for engine friction. Piston accounts for about 30% of the power cylinder friction. Thus the piston design needs to be optimized to minimize friction; and at the same time, not sacrificing the durability. This work focuses on piston friction reduction by utilizing shorter compression height piston for large bore engine application through simulation analysis study.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1090
Praveen Kumar Tumu, KungHao Wang, Juhchin Yang, Selvakumar Palani, Balaji Srinivasan
In the shop floor, cracking issue was noticed during assembly of valve seat and valve guide in the engine cylinder head, especially near the valve seating area. This paper reveals a non- linear finite element methodology to verify the structural integrity of a cylinder head during valve seat and valve guide assembly press-in operation under the maximum material condition. Material and geometrical nonlinearities, and contact are included in this method to replicate the actual seat and guide press-in operation which is being carried out in shop floor. The press-in force required for each valve seat and valve guide assembly is extracted from simulation results to find out the tonnage capacity of pressing machine for cylinder head assembly line. Stress and plastic deformation due to assembly load are the criteria checked against the respective material yield.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1074
Xingfu Chen, Todd Brewer, Cagri Sever, Eben Prabhu, Reda Adimi, Carlos Engler-Pinto
Cylinder head design is a highly challenging task for modern engines, especially for the proliferation of boosted engines (branded EcoBoost® engines by Ford Motor Company). The higher power density of these engines results in higher cylinder pressures and higher operating temperatures throughout the engine. In addition to the operating conditions, cylinder heads are usually heat treated to optimize its mechanical properties; residual stresses are generated during heat treatment, which could be detrimental for high-cycle fatigue performance. In this paper, a complete cylinder head high cycle fatigue CAE analysis procedure is demonstrated. First, the heat treatment process is simulated. The transient temperature histories during the quenching process are used to calculate the distribution of the residual stresses, followed by machining simulation, which redistributes the stress.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1075
Wen Chen, Reda Adimi, Xingfu Chen, Todd Brewer, Ling Shi
In CAE analysis of cylinder bore distortion, valve seat distortion, valve guide-to-seat misalignment and cam bore misalignment, nodal displacements on the cylinder bore inner surface and on the gage lines of valve seats, valve guides and cam bores are typically output. Best fit cylinders, best fit circles and best fit lines are computed by utilizing the output displacements of the deformed configuration. Based on the information of the best fit geometry, distortions and misalignments are assessed. Some commercial and in-house software is available to compute the best fit cylinders, best fit circles and best fit lines. However, they suffer from the drawback that only one best-fit geometry can be computed at a time. For example, in the valve seat distortion analysis of a typical 4-cylinder, 4-valve engine, 16 best fit circles are needed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1091
Todd Brewer, Xingfu Chen
Typically, modern automotive engine designs include separate cylinder heads and cylinder blocks with a multilayer steel head gasket to seal the resulting joint. Cylinder head bolts are typically used to hold the joint together and non-linear properties of head gasket provide sealing capabilities of this joint, which is essential for engine durability and performance. There are three major failure modes for head gasket joint: fluid leakage due to low sealing pressure, bead cracking due to high gap alternation and scrubbing/fretting due to pressure and temperature fluctuations causing lateral movement in the joint. During engine operation, head gasket design should be robust enough to prevent all three failure modes. Analysis methods to address two failure modes (fluid leakage and bead cracking) are common within the industry. This paper will be focused on gasket scrubbing/fretting failure mode. First gasket scrubbing and fretting mechanisms are investigated.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1081
Chongzhi Zhong, Tieqiang Fu, Chunbei Dai, Taiyu Zhang, Ke Wu, Wangwen Gu
To study on the influence of L/D, diameter of the adsorption tube, purge tube and air tube about carbon canister, based on the ORVR canister and ordinary canister whether with single or double cavity. The results demonstrate that the similar of L/D,efficient work ability and efficient adsorption rate of the carbon canister with partition is better than the one without partition; the diameter of adsorption tube is smaller or as similar as purge tube. For ORVR canister, it is larger than purge tube and similar as air tube, which makes more effective for canister gas adsorption from the fuel tank. The vehicle purge flow test results demonstrate that the maximum purge flow of double cavity canister is bigger than that of single cavity, while the total amount of purge flow is similar with each other. The change of the quality about double cavity canister is smaller than that of single cavity. The results provide theoretical basis for canister design.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0714
Qinglong Tang, Haifeng Liu, Mingfa Yao
Reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) is a potential combustion strategy to achieve high engine efficiency with ultra-low NOx and soot emissions. Fuel stratification can be used to control the heat release rate of RCCI combustion. But the in-cylinder combustion process of the RCCI under different fuel stratification degrees has not been well understood, especially at a higher engine load. In this paper, simultaneous measurement of natural flame luminosity and emission spectra was carried out on a light-duty optical RCCI engine under different fuel stratification degrees. The engine was run at 1200 revolutions per minute under a load about 7 bar indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP). In order to form fuel stratification degrees from low to high, the common-rail injection timing of n-heptane was changed from -180° CA after top dead center (ATDC) to -10° CA ATDC, while the iso-octane delivered in the intake stroke was fixed.
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