Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 6601
2016-10-24
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2016-10-24
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.
2016-10-24
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2016-06-27 ...
  • June 27-28, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the factors in the cylinder kit assembly of natural gas, gasoline, and diesel engines that affect oil consumption, ring and cylinder bore wear, and blow-by. This course includes background and the evolution of designs and materials currently employed in modern engines as well as providing an overview of computer models, designs, and material systems that can be utilized to optimize the performance of new engines. An overview of the trends in materials and designs employed in U.S., European and Japanese engines will be presented.
2016-06-01 ...
  • June 1-3, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 30-December 2, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2016-04-14
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2016-04-13
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2016-04-12
Event
This session considers modeling (zero-D, 1D, 2D, 3D CFD) and experimental papers on: combustion chamber, systems (lubrication, cooling, fuel, EGR); components (oil pumps, coolant pump, fuel injectors, compressors, turbines, turbochargers, torque converters, gear box, fans, bearings, valves, ports, manifolds, turbine housing); heat exchangers (radiators, oil coolers); aftertreatment (SCR, DOC, DOF, exhaust gas cooling); battery cooling (HEV, EV, motor/generator) and controls (passive and active).
2016-04-12
Event
This session considers modeling (zero-D, 1D, 2D, 3D CFD) and experimental papers on: combustion chamber, systems (lubrication, cooling, fuel, EGR); components (oil pumps, coolant pump, fuel injectors, compressors, turbines, turbochargers, torque converters, gear box, fans, bearings, valves, ports, manifolds, turbine housing); heat exchangers (radiators, oil coolers); aftertreatment (SCR, DOC, DOF, exhaust gas cooling); battery cooling (HEV, EV, motor/generator) and controls (passive and active).
2016-04-12
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2016-04-12 ...
  • April 12-13, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 5-6, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
As diesel engines become more popular, a fundamental knowledge of diesel technology is critical for anyone involved in the diesel engine support industry. This course will explain the fundamental technology of diesel engines starting with a short but thorough introduction of the diesel combustion cycle, and continue with aspects of engine design, emission control design, and more. An overview of developing technologies for the future with a comprehensive section on exhaust aftertreatment is also included. The text, Diesel Emissions and Their Control, authored by Magdi Khair and W. Addy Majewski is included with the seminar.
2016-04-11 ...
  • April 11-13, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 3-5, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The need to control emissions and maintain fuel economy is driving the use of advanced turbocharging technology in both diesel and gasoline engines. As the use of diesel engines in passenger car gasoline and diesel engines increases, a greater focus on advanced turbocharging technology is emerging in an effort to reap the benefits obtained from turbocharging and engine downsizing. This seminar covers the basic concepts of turbocharging of gasoline and diesel engines (light and heavy duty), including turbocharger matching and charge air and EGR cooling, as well as associated controls.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0647
Azmi Osman, M. Khairul Arif Muhammad Yusof, Mohammad Rafi
Additional fuel consumption reduction during the NEDC test cycle and real life driving can be effectively achieved by quickly raising the temperatures of the powertrain’s parts, oils and coolant closer to the optimal operating temperatures. In particular, the engine cooling system today must play a bigger role in the overall thermal management of the powertrain’s fluids and metals during warm-up, idle and severe operating conditions. In responding to these additional requirements, the previously proposed cost effective split cooling system has been further evolved to expedite the powertrain’s warming up process without compromising the overall heat rejection performance during severe operating conditions. In achieving these warming and cooling functions, the coolant flow rate in the cylinder head is almost stagnant when the single thermostat is closed and at its maximum when the thermostat is fully opened.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1022
Ahsanul Karim, Anthony Morelli, Keith Miazgowicz, Brian Lizotte, Robert Wade
The use of Swirl-Vanes or Inlet Guide Vanes (IGV) in gas engines is well-known and has demonstrated their ability to improve compressor surge margin at low flow rates. But, the use of swirl-vanes is not too common in large diesel engine turbo-chargers where compressor housing inlet has some form of Casing–Treatment (CT). Ford engineers tested swirl-vanes in a diesel engine turbocharger where the compressor inlet had a ported shroud casing-treatment and the experimental data showed no improvement in the surge margin. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analyses were performed to investigate reasons why the surge margin did not improve after introducing swirl-vanes at the compressor inlet. The CFD results showed strong interactions between swirling flow at the compressor inlet and flow stream coming out of the compressor inlet casing-treatment.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1041
Hiep Hoang Tran
Developing electric supercharger of two stage boosting system with turbocharger for different downsized gasoline engine B. Richards1, K. Gray1, H. Tran1, M. Bassett2, J. Hall2 1: Aeristech Limited, Unit G, Princes Drive Industrial Est, Coventry Rd, Kenilworth, CV8 2FD, UK. 2: MAHLE Powertrain Limited, Costin House, St. James Mill Road, Northampton, NN5 5TZ, UK. Abstract Extreme engine downsizing is a modern solution aimed towards the goal of meeting new emissions regulations for internal combustion engines. A higher percentage downsized engine will produce less CO2 and, by extension, a higher boost level is required to generate high engine torque performance. The transient load step of a higher boost system at low RPM is currently an issue for conventional boosting. Aeristech has developed an electric supercharger for a two stage boosting system with conventional turbocharger for a new type of downsized gasoline engine.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0180
Montassar KHAMMASSI, Thierry Marimbordes, Judicael Aubry, Bertrand BARBEDETTE, Mickael Cormerais, Cherif LAROUCI, Quentin Frossard
In order to cope with new regulations and find a better compromise between fuel consumption, pollutant emissions and comfort, thermal management technologies are getting more complex. This is especially true when it requires replacing a basic passive solution with a mechatronic system. A new Active Cooling Thermal-management (ACT) valve concept has been developed to specifically replace wax thermostat while keeping the same packaging and cost range and bringing closed loop temperature control, fast response time and precision. This new module is manufactured by assembling injected thermoplastic components. By essence it leads to dimension tolerances, deformation and wear over its life. Those uncertainties and deviations have to be taken into account when the nominal part is designed to ensure part efficiency till the end of its life.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1043
The piston skirt is an important contributor of friction in the piston assembly. This paper discusses friction contributions from various aspects of the piston skirt. A brief study of piston skirt patterns is presented, with little gains being made by patterning the piston skirt coating. Next the roughness of the piston skirt coating is analyzed, and results show that reducing piston skirt roughness can have positive effects on friction reduction. Finally, an introductory study into the profile of the piston skirt is presented, with the outcome being that friction reduction is possible by optimizing the skirt profile.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1034
Georges Salameh, Pascal Chesse, David Chalet, Vincent Talon
Engine downsizing is potentially one of the most effective strategies being explored to improve fuel economy. A main problem of downsizing using a turbocharger is the small range of stable functioning of the turbocharger centrifugal compressor at high boost pressures, and hence the measurement of the performance maps of both compressor and turbine. Automotive manufacturers use mainly numerical simulations for internal combustion engines simulations, hence the need of an accurate extrapolation model to get a complete turbine performance map. These complete maps are then used for internal combustion engines calibration. Automotive manufacturers use commercial softwares to extrapolate the turbine narrow performance maps, both mass flow characteristics and the efficiency curve.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0238
Gang Liu, Zheng Zhao, Hao Guan, Yaqi Liu, Chunhui Zhang, Dingwei Gao, Wuming Zhou, Juergen knauf
Reducing fuel consumption is a major challenge for vehicle, especially for SUV. Cooling loss is about 30% in total energy loss under NEDC cycle. It is necessary to optimize vehicle thermal management system to improve fuel economy. Otherwise, lower warm-up time is beneficial for friction reduction and passenger comfort in cold-start. Vehicle thermal behavior is influenced by cooling system layout, new technology and control strategy. Thermal management simulation is effective to show the energy flow and fuel consumption under the influence of new technology under NEDC cycle. So 1D thermal management simulation model is created, including vehicle, cooling system, lubrication system and detailed engine model with all friction components. And the interrelations between all the components are considered in the model. For model calibration, large amount of data is obtained from vehicle tests such as transient fuel consumption and transient coolant temperature.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1388
Baoke Huang, Jun Sun, Hu Wang, Xiaoyong Zhao, Qin Teng
In current design optimization of engine crankshaft bearing, only the crankshaft bearing is considered as the studying object. However, the corresponding relations of major structure dimensions exist between the crankshaft and the crankshaft bearing in engine, and there are the interaction effects between the crankshaft and the crankshaft bearing during the operation of engine. In this paper, the crankshaft-bearing system of a four-cylinder engine is considered as the studying object, the multi-objective design optimization of crankshaft bearing is developed. The crankshaft mass and the total frictional power loss of crankshaft bearings are selected as the objective functions in the design optimization of crankshaft bearing. The Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm based on the idea of decreasing strategy of inertia weight with the exponential type is used in the optimization calculation.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0099
Deepak Venkatesh B, Arockia Selvakumar A
The concept of camless engines enables us to optimize the overall engine efficiency and performance, as it provides great flexibility in valve timing and valve displacement. This paper deals with design of camless engines with pneumatic actuator. The main objective of this research is to build a prototype and test its performance at different engine speeds. Also an extensive research on the sensors is done to detect the various sensors that could be used to identify the crankshaft position. In addition the overview of the proposed camless engine system is focused with the design principles and the components used. The developed pneumatic system is capable of actuating at 1500 rpm and demonstrates the ability of pneumatic actuators to be used in an internal combustion engine with low rpm needs.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1085
Ming Chen, Yanjun Wang, Wenrui Wu, Quan Cui, Kai Wang, Lingfang Wang
Thermal-mechanical Fatigue Prediction of Aluminum Cylinder Head with Integrated Exhaust Manifold of a Turbo Charged Gasoline Engine Abstract The present paper describes a CAE analysis approach to evaluate the design of cylinder head of a turbo charged GDI engine with integrated exhaust manifold. It allows design engineers to identify structural weakness at the early stage or to find the root cause of cylinder head TMF failures. At SAIC Motor, in test validation phase, a newly developed engine must pass a strict durability test under thermal cycling conditions so that the durability characteristics can be evaluated. The accelerated test is so designed that it gives equivalent cumulative damage as what would occur in the useful life of the vehicle. The duty cycle includes heat-up and cool-down phases with different engine speeds at full loads and motored conditions.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1045
Paul J. Shayler, Li Cheng, Qile Li, Emad Wahab
The oil distribution system of a light duty diesel engine has been modified to allow the flow to the crankshaft main bearings and big end bearings to be restricted without risk of damage to other parts of the engine. The oil pump has been driven by an externally powered electric motor, allowing pump delivery to be decoupled from engine speed. The flow is split to separate the feed to the valve train and turbocharger from the feed to the piston cooling jets, the crankshaft main bearings and the big end bearings. The feed pressures in the two streams are separately controlled. The aim has been to demonstrate experimentally that significant reductions in engine friction, and improved fuel economy, can be achieved. It is shown that reducing the feed pressure to the bearings to 1.5 bar absolute from a baseline pressure of 2.1bar absolute, at which piston cooling jets close, a reduction in engine friction mean effective pressure of 8% was achieved.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0653
Sethuramalingam T, Chandrakant Parmar, Sashikant Tiwari
The aim of this paper is to strategize thermal protection of the engine and components in a vehicle with engine mounted in rear and radiator along with cooling fan mounted in front. An additional Exhaust Fan with speed sensor is fitted in rear mounted engine compartment and a unique monitoring technique framed in the EMS ECU is used to maintain safety of critical components like HT cables, alternators, wiring harness etc. The EMS continuously monitors the engine speed, vehicle speed and the PWM signal from exhaust fan to ensure the intended operation of the exhaust fan. With the implementation of additional exhaust fan it was observed that max engine compartment temp did not exceed safe operating temperature limit when the vehicle is driven in all road load condition (including highway, city & mountain drive tests) in all vehicle operating conditions. The component temperature was observed within acceptable operating temperature.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-1381
Jiaqi Li, Jimin Ni, Xiuyong Shi
Sealing system is an important subsystem of modern high-performance engine. Sealing system reliability directly affects the engine operating conditions. Cylinder head gaskets(CHG) sealing system is of the most importance to the engine sealing system, which is not only responsible for sealing chamber, the cooling fluid and lubricating oil passage, for preventing gas leakage, water leakage and oil leakage, but also for force transferring between cylinder head and cylinder body. Basing on nonlinear solution method, the sealing performance of multi-layer-steel cylinder head gaskets to a gasoline engine is studied with the finite element software ABAQUS. The deformations of the cylinder liners and engine block are also considered.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0382
Chao Shi, Kenji Sato, Takeru Hamakawa, Yoshimichi Ishihara, Shinichi Takahashi
Recently, in order to improve the fuel efficiency, engine weight reduction turns to be a major trend. However the deformations of Crankshaft and Cylinder Block are increased due to the weight saving, and that lead to a problem of fretting fatigue which occurred on the contact surfaces of the Bearing cap and Cylinder Block. Even though some researchers have found the mechanism of the fretting fatigue on the Cylinder Block, still don’t have an effectual method to fix the problem in the development stage .In this report, various influence factors are investigated using quality engineering on a unit equipment , the results showed a good correlation between unit and real engine test . In addition analysis approaches about get basic material data, predictive methods for fretting fatigue at the early design stage are also be presented.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0853
Francesco Catapano, Michela Costa, Guido Marseglia, Paolo Sementa, Ugo Sorge, Bianca Maria Vaglieco
Performance of internal combustion engines is well known being greatly affected by the air-fuel mixture formation process. In GDI engines, the impact of the gasoline spray on the piston or cylinder walls is a key factor, especially under the so-called wall-guided mixture formation mode, but not only. The impact causes droplets rebound and/or the deposition of a liquid film (wallfilm). After being rebounded, droplets undergo what is called secondary atomization. The wallfilm, on the other hand, may remain of no negligible size and evaporate slowly. This leads to increased unburned hydrocarbons and particulate matter emissions. In the present paper, the experimental characterization of a multi-hole spray in its impact over the piston shaped is carried out through optical diagnostic developed under different injection strategies to investigate the effect of the wall temperature distribution on the phenomenon.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0490
Carsten Schneider, Johannes Halbhuber, Georg Wachtmeister
Measuring and simulating the contact between piston pin and connecting rod is very complex. The pin can rotate freely in the conrod as well as in the piston. Further, there is no defined oil supply with a constant pressure as it is in main bearings for example. A tribometer test bench was adapted to measure friction between pin and conrod. The system is loaded with a constant force and oil supply is realized as defined deficient lubrication. During one part of the schedule, the rotational speed is defined as ramp to measure friction coefficient over speed, in another part the speed was pivoted from positive to negative speed within less than one millisecond. With this measurement method, the different friction coefficients between radial slider and pivot bearings could be quantified. The measurements were made for four different pin-coatings.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0575
Konstantinos Siokos, Rohit Koli, Robert Prucka, Jason Schwanke, Shyam Jade
Low pressure (LP) and cooled EGR systems are capable of increasing fuel efficiency of turbocharged gasoline engines, however they introduce control challenges. Accurate exhaust pressure modeling is of particular importance for real-time feedforward control of these EGR systems since they operate under low pressure differentials. To provide a solution that does not depend on physical sensors in the exhaust and also does not require extensive calibration, a coupled temperature and pressure physics-based model is proposed. The exhaust manifold is split into two different lumped sections based on flow conditions in order to calculate the turbine-outlet pressure, which is the driving force for LP-EGR. The temperature model uses the turbine-outlet temperature as an input, which is known through existing engine control models, to determine heat transfer losses through the exhaust.
2016-04-05
Technical Paper
2016-01-0688
Daniel UGURU-OKORIE
Fluctuations in the operational output of spark ignition engines are observed from one engine cycle to the other, when an engine is run at technically identical operating condition. These fluctuations known as cycle-to-cycle variations, when high, adversely affect the performance of an engine. Reduction in cycle-to-cycle variation in engines has been noted by researchers as one of the methods of improving engine efficiency and operational stability. This study investigated the combustion performance characteristics of two fuels: E5 (95% gasoline and 5% ethanol) and ULG98 (unleaded gasoline) in a spark ignition engine, operating at varying inlet pressure conditions and ignition timing. A two-stroke, 80mm bore, spark ignition engine was operated at an engine speed of 750 rpm, inlet pressures of 1.6 and 2.0 bar and spark-timings ranging from 2 to 13 bTDC. A top cylinder head with a centralized spark plug was used in all the experiments.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6601

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: