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2015-07-20 ...
  • July 20-21, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the factors in the cylinder kit assembly of natural gas, gasoline, and diesel engines that affect oil consumption, ring and cylinder bore wear, and blow-by. This course includes background and the evolution of designs and materials currently employed in modern engines as well as providing an overview of computer models, designs, and material systems that can be utilized to optimize the performance of new engines. An overview of the trends in materials and designs employed in U.S., European and Japanese engines will be presented.
2015-04-21
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2015-04-21
Event
In this session, research and development of small engine technology will be covered. Topics include combustion, emission, control, and NVH.
2015-04-21
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2015-04-21 ...
  • April 21-22, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • August 24-25, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 8-9, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Attendees to the seminars held in conjunction with the SAE 2015 World Congress will receive COMPLETE access to Congress activities for only $55 per day. If interested, please contact our Customer Service department at +1.877.606.7323 (U.S. and Canada only) or +1.724.776.4970 (outside U.S. and Canada) to register for this special Congress daily rate. As diesel engines become more popular, a fundamental knowledge of diesel technology is critical for anyone involved in the diesel engine support industry.
2015-03-16 ...
  • March 16-18, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • July 27-29, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • November 9-11, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The need to control emissions and maintain fuel economy is driving the use of advanced turbocharging technology in both diesel and gasoline engines. As the use of diesel engines in passenger car gasoline and diesel engines increases, a greater focus on advanced turbocharging technology is emerging in an effort to reap the benefits obtained from turbocharging and engine downsizing. This seminar covers the basic concepts of turbocharging of gasoline and diesel engines (light and heavy duty), including turbocharger matching and charge air and EGR cooling, as well as associated controls.
2014-12-03 ...
  • December 3-5, 2014 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • June 3-5, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • December 9-11, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0126
Giovanni Vichi, Isacco Stiaccini, Alessandro Bellissima, Ryota Minamino, Lorenzo Ferrari, Giovanni Ferrara
Abstract A condition monitoring activity consists in the analysis of several information from the engine and the subsequent data elaboration to assess its operating condition. By means of a continuous supervision of the operating conditions the internal combustion engine performance can be maintained at design-level in the long term. The growing use of turbocharger (TC) in automotive field suggests to use the TC speed as a possible feedback of engine operating condition. Indeed, the turbocharger behavior is influenced by the thermo and fluid-dynamic conditions in the cylinder exhaust port: this feature suggests that the TC speed could provide useful data about the engine cycle. In this study the authors describe a theoretical and numerical analysis focused on the TC speed in a four stroke turbo-diesel engine. The purpose of this study is to highlight whether the TC speed allows one to detect the variation of the engine parameters.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0100
Ken Naitoh, Takuma Okamoto, Tomoaki Kubota, Kan Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki Nojima, Taro Tamura
An inexpensive, lightweight, and relatively quiet engine reactor that has the potential to achieve thermal efficiency over 50% for small engines was proposed in our previous reports, which is achieved with colliding supermulti-jets that create air insulation to encase burned gas around the chamber center, avoiding contact with the chamber walls and piston surfaces. The colliding of pulse jets can maintain high pressure ratio for various air-fuel ratios, whereas traditional homogeneous compression engines due to piston cannot get high pressure ratio at stoichiometric condition. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that higher compression in this engine results in less combustion noise because of encasing effect. Here, a small prototype engine having supermulti-jets colliding with pulse and strongly-asymmetric double-piston system is examined by using computational experiments. Pulse can be generated by the double piston system of a short stroke of about 40mm.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0112
Christian Zinner, Reinhard Stelzl, Stephan Schmidt, Stefan Leiber, Thomas Schabetsberger
Abstract There are several reasons for equipping an internal combustion engine with a turbo-charger. The most important motivation for motorcycle use is to increase the power to weight ratio. Focusing on the special boundary conditions of motorcycles, like the wide engine speed range or the extraordinarily high demands on response behavior, automotive downsizing technologies cannot be transferred directly to this field of application. This led to the main question: Is it possible to design a turbo-charged motorcycle engine with satisfactory drivability and response behavior? The layout of the charged motorcycle engine was derived by simulation and had to be verified by experimental investigations. Main components, like the turbo charger or the waste gate control as well as the influence of the increasing back pressure on the combustion, were verified by test bench measurements. Afterwards the operation strategy in general was investigated and applied to the prototype engine.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0110
P S Satyanarayana, Balasubramanian Loganathan, V Lakshminarasimhan, A Ramesh, S Sujatha
In this work, a new mechanical cam phaser (MCP) system is developed. This MCP system is simple, reliable, and cost-effective, and also offers good control. Phasing of either intake, exhaust or both intake and exhaust cam can be achieved with this system. A prototype of the mechanical cam phaser has been tested on a motored rig to validate its dynamic characteristics. The system was tested onto a small two wheeler engine and this paper describes the newly developed MCP mechanism and its effects on the performance of a small two wheeler engine.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0061
Rama Subbu, Baskar Anthony Samy, Piyush Mani Sharma, Prasanna Mahendiran
Abstract Ride comfort, driving stability and drivability are vital factors in terms of vehicle performance and customer satisfaction. Crankshaft unbalance is a source for the vibration that reduces the vehicle performance and it needs to be controlled to some extent such that the vehicle performance will be improved. The IC engine is made up of reciprocating and rotating parts. They produce unbalance forces during their operation and produces vibration in Vehicle. The vibration reduction will be possible by minimizing these unbalance forces and by optimizing the crankshaft of the two wheeled vehicle engine design. Many researches were made to find the causes for the vibration and to reduce it. But still there is a research gap on the testing and simulation of engine components (crankshaft, connecting rod and piston assembly). In this study, an attempt is made to represent the engine vibrations and its isolation to provide a gate way for the future work on it.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0052
Tatsuhiko Sato, Hirotaka Kurita, Akemi Ito, Hideyuki Iwasaki
Abstract The improvement of fuel consumption is the most important issue for engine manufactures from the viewpoint of energy and environment conservation. A piston-cylinder system plays an important role for the reduction of an engine friction. For the improvement of the frictional behavior of the piston-cylinder system, it is beneficial to observe and analyze the frictional waveforms during an engine operation. To meet the above-mentioned demand, frictional waveforms were measured with using the renewed floating liner device. In the newly developed floating liner device, an actual cylinder block itself was used as a test specimen. The measured single cylinder was an aluminum monolithic type made of hypereutectic Al-17%Si alloy using a high pressure die casting process. The combined piston was a light weight forged piston and a DLC coated piston ring was used. For the measurement, 110cc air cooled single cylinder engine was used.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0051
Akira Ishibashi, Muneaki Nakamura, Hitoshi Muramatsu
Abstract Currently, the improvement of fuel economy is the most important issue in automobile engine development. To improve fuel economy via greater thermal efficiency, the enhancement of the compression ratio and the reduction of thermal losses because of cooling have been widely investigated. These efforts to improve thermal efficiency increase the thermal load on pistons. Ensuring the reliability of the pistons and the antiknocking capacity of engines require a better understanding of piston temperature distributions through accurate measurements under various engine operating conditions. Thus, direct and indirect measurement methods have been developed to estimate the actual piston temperature. Direct methods, such as linkage-type measurements, are not typically applicable under higher engine speeds because of the poor durability of linkages.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0075
Kazuyoshi Shimatani
Abstract Various sensors including throttle position sensors (TPS), manifold pressure sensors (MPS), crank angle sensors, engine temperature sensors, and oxygen sensors are mounted in electronically controlled fuel injection (FI) systems to accurately regulate the air-fuel ratio according to the operating state and operating environment. Among these vehicle-mounted sensors, TPS has functions for detecting a fully-closed throttle and estimating intake air volume by the amount of throttle opening. Currently, we have conducted a study on transferring TPS functions into the MPS (manifold pressure sensor) in order to eliminate the TPS. Here we report on detecting a fully-closed throttle for achieving fuel cut control (FCC) and idle speed control (ISC) in fuel injection systems. We contrived a means for fully-closed throttle detection during ISC and controlling changes in the bypass opening during FCC in order to accurately judge each fully-closed throttle state via the manifold pressure.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0063
Daniela Siano, Fabio Bozza, Danilo D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta Panza
Abstract In the present work, an Auto Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) model and a Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) are applied on vibrational signals, acquired by an accelerometer placed on the cylinder block of a Spark Ignition (SI) engine, for knock detection purposes. To the aim of tuning such procedures, the same analysis has been carried out by using the traditional MAPO (Maximum Amplitude of Pressure Oscillations) index and an Inverse Kinetic Model (IKM), both applied on the in-cylinder pressure signals. Vibrational and in-cylinder pressure signals have been collected on a four cylinder, four stroke engine, for different engine speeds, load conditions and spark advances. The results of the two vibrational based methods are compared and in depth discussed to the aim of highlighting the pros and cons of each methodology.
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0065
Ryosuke Ibata, Hirotaka Kawatsu, Tetsuya Kaneko, Kenji Nishida
Abstract The technology to estimate engine load using the amplitude of crankshaft angular velocity variation during a cycle, which is referred to as “Δω (delta omega)”, in a four-stroke single-cylinder gasoline engine has been established in our former studies. This study was aimed to apply this technology to the spark advance control system for small motorcycles. The cyclic variation of the Δω signal, which affects engine load detection accuracy, was a crucial issue when developing the system. To solve this issue, filtering functions that can cope with various running conditions were incorporated into the computation process that estimates engine loads from Δω signals. In addition, the system made it possible to classify engine load into two levels without a throttle sensor currently used. We have thus successfully developed the new spark advance system that is controlled in accordance with the engine speed and load.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0011
Pavel Brynych, Jan Macek, Pascal Tribotte, Gaetano De Paola, Cyprien Ternel
Abstract The objective of this paper is to present the results of the GT Power calibration with engine test results of the air loop system technology down selection described in the SAE Paper No. 2012-01-0831. Two specific boosting systems were identified as the preferred path forward: (1) Super-turbo with two speed Roots type supercharger, (2) Super-turbo with centrifugal mechanical compressor and CVT transmission both downstream a Fixed Geometry Turbine. The initial performance validation of the boosting hardware in the gas stand and the calibration of the GT Power model developed is described. The calibration leverages data coming from the tests on a 2 cylinder 2-stroke 0.73L diesel engine. The initial flow bench results suggested the need for a revision of the turbo matching due to the big gap in performance between predicted maps and real data. This activity was performed using Honeywell turbocharger solutions spacing from fixed geometry waste gate to variable nozzle turbo (VNT).
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0004
Yuma Ishizawa, Munehiro Matsuishi, Yasuhide Abe, Go Emori, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji, Kazuhito Misawa, Hiraku Kojima, Kenjiro Nakama
Abstract One issue of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines that should be addressed is to suppress rapid combustion in the high-load region. Supercharging the intake air so as to form a leaner mixture is one way of moderating HCCI combustion. However, the specific effect of supercharging on moderating HCCI combustion and the mechanism involved are not fully understood yet. Therefore, experiments were conducted in this study that were designed to moderate rapid combustion in a test HCCI engine by supercharging the air inducted into the cylinder. The engine was operated under high-load levels in a supercharged state in order to make clear the effect of supercharging on expanding the stable operating region in the high-load range. HCCI combustion was investigated under these conditions by making in-cylinder spectroscopic measurements and by analyzing the exhaust gas using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0034
Saager Paliwal, Alex S. Bare, Katherine J. Lawrence, Marc Anderson, Glenn Bower
Abstract This study looks at the application of a titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalytic nanoparticle suspension to the surface of the combustion chamber as a coating, as well as the addition of hydrogen gas to a four-stroke spark-ignited carbureted engine as a possible technique for lowering engine-out emissions. The experiments were conducted on two identical Generac gasoline powered generators using two, four and six halogen work lamps to load the engine. One generator was used as a control and the second had key components of the combustion chamber coated with the catalytic suspension. In addition to the coating, both engines were fed a hydrogen and oxygen gas mixture and tested at low, medium and high loads. Using an unmodified engine as a control set, the following three conditions were tested and compared: addition of hydrogen only, addition of coating only, and addition of hydrogen to the coated engine.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0013
Stefano Frigo, Gianluca Pasini, Silvia Marelli, Giovanni Lutzemberger, Massimo Capobianco, Paolo Bolognesi, Roberto Gentili, Massimo Ceraolo
Abstract To downsize a spark ignited (SI) internal combustion engine (ICE), keeping suitable power levels, the application of turbocharging is mandatory. The possibility to couple an electric drive to the turbocharger (electric turbo compound, ETC) can be considered, as demonstrated by a number of studies and the current application in the F1 Championship, since it allows to extend the boost region to the lowest ICE rotational speeds and to reduce the turbo lag. As well, some recovery of the exhaust gas residual energy to produce electrical energy is possible. The present paper shows the first numerical results of a research program under way in collaboration between the Universities of Pisa and Genoa. The study is focused on the evaluation of the benefits resulting from the application of ETC to a twin-cylinder small SI engine (900 cm3).
2014-11-11
Journal Article
2014-32-0091
Kazushi Tamura, Toshimasa Utaka, Hideki Kamano, Norikuni Hayakawa, Tomomi Miyasaka, Takashi Ishino, Akira Iijima, Hideo Shoji
Abstract Although metallic compounds are widely known to affect combustion in internal combustion engines, the potential of metallic additives in engine oils to initiate abnormal combustion has been unclear. In this study, we investigated the influence of combustion chamber deposits derived from engine oil additives on combustion in a spark-ignited engine. We used a single-cylinder four-stroke engine, and measured several combustion characteristics (e.g., cylinder pressure, in-cylinder ultraviolet absorbance in the end-gas region, and visualized flame propagation) to evaluate combustion anomalies. To clarify the effects of individual additive components, we formed combustion products of individual additives in a combustion chamber prior to measuring combustion characteristics. We tested three types of metallic additives: a calcium-based detergent, a zinc-based antiwear agent, and a molybdenum-based friction modifier.
2014-11-11
Technical Paper
2014-32-0094
Yuichi Seki, Keito Negoro, Norimasa Iida, Katsuya Matsuura, Hiroshi Sono
Abstract This study investigated effects of gas inhomogeneity induced by droplets of fuels and oils on the auto ignition timing and temperature in the direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) engine by means of detailed numerical calculation using multi zone model. Recent researchers pointed out that droplets are made of fuels and oils which mix on the cylinder liner and released from the cylinder liner [1]. During the compression stroke released droplets reach the auto ignition temperature before flame propagation induced by spark ignition. It is called Pre-ignition. In combustion chamber, there is inhomogeneity caused by temperature and mixture distribution. In this study, the effects of gas inhomogeneity produced by droplet on the auto ignition timing and temperature have been investigated using Multi-Zone model of CHEMKIN-PRO by changing initial temperature and initial equivalence ratio. Especially, the volume of first ignition zone is focused on.
2014-10-22
Event
This session describes design, performance, and operating characteristic of crucial peripheral devices, intake and exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures and features.
2014-10-21
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2014-10-13
Technical Paper
2014-01-2559
Christopher Bannister
Abstract When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data.
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