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2017-06-06 ...
  • June 6-8, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • November 14-16, 2017 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
Turbocharging is already a key part of heavy duty diesel engine technology. However, the need to meet emissions regulations is rapidly driving the use of turbo diesel and turbo gasoline engines for passenger vehicles. Turbocharged diesel engines improve the fuel economy of baseline gasoline engine powered passenger vehicles by 30-50%. Turbocharging is critical for diesel engine performance and for emissions control through a well designed exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system. In gasoline engines, turbocharging enables downsizing which improves fuel economy by 5-20%.
2017-04-06
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2017-04-06
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2017-04-06
Event
This session will cover conceptual, modeling and experimental studies relating to advanced turbochargers/superchargers and advanced boosting systems to achieve increased power density, better fuel economy, and reduced emissions.
2017-04-05
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-04-05
Event
This session covers the Power Cylinder: piston, piston rings, piston pins, and connecting rods. The papers include information on reducing friction and increasing fuel economy, improving durability by understanding wear, and decreasing oil consumption and blow-by.
2017-04-05 ...
  • April 5-7, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • September 27-29, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The need to control emissions and maintain fuel economy is driving the use of advanced turbocharging technology in both diesel and gasoline engines. As the use of diesel engines in passenger car gasoline and diesel engines increases, a greater focus on advanced turbocharging technology is emerging in an effort to reap the benefits obtained from turbocharging and engine downsizing. This seminar covers the basic concepts of turbocharging of gasoline and diesel engines (light and heavy duty), including turbocharger matching and charge air and EGR cooling, as well as associated controls.
2017-04-05 ...
  • April 5-6, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 3-4, 2017 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
As diesel engines become more popular, a fundamental knowledge of diesel technology is critical for anyone involved in the diesel engine support industry. This course will explain the fundamental technology of diesel engines starting with a short but thorough introduction of the diesel combustion cycle, and continue with aspects of engine design, emission control design, and more. An overview of developing technologies for the future with a comprehensive section on exhaust aftertreatment is also included. The text, Diesel Emissions and Their Control, authored by Magdi Khair and W. Addy Majewski is included with the seminar.
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-04-04
Event
This session describes the design, modeling and performance validation of cylinder heads, lubrication systems and pumps, coolant systems and pumps, intake manifolds, exhaust manifolds, and engine block structures.`
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0141
Ray Host, Peter Moilanen, Marcus Fried, Bhageerath Bogi
Future vehicle North American emissions standards (e.g., North American SULEV 30) require the exhaust catalyst to be >80% efficient by 20 seconds after the engine has been started in the Federal Test Procedure. Turbocharged engines are especially challenged to deliver fast catalyst lightoff since the presence of the turbocharger in the exhaust flow path significantly increases exhaust system heat losses. A solution to delivering cost effective SULEV30 emissions in turbocharged engines is to achieve fast catalyst light-off by reducing exhaust system heat losses in cold start, without increasing catalyst thermal degradation during high load operation. A CAE methodology to assess the thermal performance of exhaust system hardware options, from the exhaust port to the catalyst brick face is described, which assures compliance with future emissions regulations.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1029
Mitsuhiro Shibata, Masashi kawamata, Hirotaka Komatsu, Kazuki Maeyama, Masaru Asari, Naoki Hotta, Kazutaka Nakada, Hisashi Daicho
To comply with the environmental demands for CO2 reduction without compromising driving performance, a new 1.0L I3 turbocharged gasoline direct injection engine has been developed. This engine is the smallest product in the new Honda VTEC TURBO engine series, and it is intended to be used in small to medium-sized passenger car category vehicles, enhancing both fuel economy through downsizing, downspeeding and state-of-the-art friction reduction technologies, and also driving performance through turbocharging with an electrically controlled waste gate. This 1.0L I3 engine has many features in common with other VTEC TURBO engines such as the 1.5L I4 engine and 2.0L I4 engine, which have already been introduced on the market. Some of these are the rapid combustion concept realized by high tumble intake port design and the optimized combustion chamber configuration combined with a side mounted multi-holes direct injection system.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1025
Qinghe Luo, Baigang Sun, Xi Wang
Hydrogen is the most promising way for energy carrier because it has fast combustion velocity, the wide range of sources and the cleaning of combustion products. The hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) with turbocharger has been used to solve the contradiction of the power density and controlling NOx. However, the selection of the compressor for HICE with turbocharger is very different from the traditional engines because of the gas fuel. Hydrogen as the gas fuel takes the cylinder volume, which will increase the pressure and reduce the mass flow rate of air in the cylinder. Thus, this paper put forward a new method for the HICE with turbocharger taking into account of the effect of hydrogen in the cylinder. This method can calculate the turbocharging pressure ratio and the mass flow rate of air through the target power and the general parameters such as the displacement of cylinder, the intake temperature of hydrogen and the equivalence ratio of the mixture.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0341
Seyyedvahid Mortazavian, Javid Moraveji, Reda Adimi, Xingfu Chen
Engine camshaft cap components experience high number of fluctuating loads during engine operation. The problem is complicated in engines with variable cam timing, because the loading for these components are sensitive to engine valve timing (combustion phasing) which can lead to catastrophic overload or fatigue failures. Improving the design of these components using computer-aided tools can drastically reduce the cost and time to the market of the final acceptable design, by eliminating the number of physical prototypes. Hence, a decent and robust finite element analysis with representative load and boundary conditions can significantly reduce the premature failures in engine development. In this study, first a finite element analysis method is developed for simulating a cap punching bench test. Effect of punch radius and shape on the component stiffness is investigated and correlated with test data.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1036
Silvia Marelli, Simone Gandolfi, Massimo Capobianco
In the last few years, the effect of diabatic test conditions on compressor performance maps has been widely investigated leading some Authors to propose different correction models. The aim of the paper is to investigate the effect of heat transfer phenomena on the experimental definition of turbocharger maps, focusing on turbine performance. An experimental investigation on a small turbocharger for automotive application has been carried out and presented. The study focused onto the effects of internal heat transfer on turbine thermo-mechanical efficiency. The experimental campaign was developed considering the effect of different heat transfer state by varying turbine inlet temperature, oil and coolant temperature and compressor inlet pressure. An original model developed by the Authors is adopted for the correction of compressor steady flow maps.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0640
Robert Wade, Steven Murphy, Paul Cross, Craig Hansen
The Variable Displacement Supercharger (VDS) is a twin helical screw style compressor that has a feature to change the compression ratio actively during vehicle operation. This device can reduce the parasitic losses associated with supercharging and improve the relative fuel economy of a supercharged engine. Supercharging is a boosting choice with several advantages over turbocharging. There is fast pressure delivery to the engine intake manifold for fast engine torque response and the fun to drive feel. The performance delivered by a supercharger can enable engine fuel economy actions like engine downsizing and downspeeding. The cost and difficulty of engineering hot exhaust components is eliminated with using only an air side compressor. Faster catalyst warm up can be achieved when not warming the turbine housing of a turbocharger.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1037
Christoph Haidinger, Wolfgang Kriegler, Adrian Millward-Sadler, Philipp Eder
This paper deals with an improved design of a pressure wave supercharger for small recreational vehicles like motorbikes or snowmobiles. A pressure wave supercharger (PWS), commonly known as Comprex (or Hyprex), provides very good torque response behavior and is used to lower emissions. However, compared to a standard turbocharger system, a standard PWS system has some inherent disadvantages too. Main problems are noise emissions and the expensive manufacture. Therefore, the goal of this study is to eliminate these shortcomings and to propose a completely new design which promises easy and relatively inexpensive production. In this paper, the conceptual development of a new PWS type is presented. Methods used were computational fluid dynamics simulations and the analysis of an existing Comprex design. High attention has been paid to the producibility of the aggregate. Though there are big design differences compared to a standard PWS, the working principle per se remains the same.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1075
Wen Chen, Reda Adimi, Xingfu Chen, Todd Brewer, Ling Shi
In CAE analysis of cylinder bore distortion, valve seat distortion, valve guide-to-seat misalignment and cam bore misalignment, nodal displacements on the cylinder bore inner surface and on the gage lines of valve seats, valve guides and cam bores are typically output. Best fit cylinders, best fit circles and best fit lines are computed by utilizing the output displacements of the deformed configuration. Based on the information of the best fit geometry, distortions and misalignments are assessed. Some commercial and in-house software is available to compute the best fit cylinders, best fit circles and best fit lines. However, they suffer from the drawback that only one best-fit geometry can be computed at a time. For example, in the valve seat distortion analysis of a typical 4-cylinder, 4-valve engine, 16 best fit circles are needed.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1042
Eric J. Passow, Paras Sethi, Max Maschewske, Jason Bieneman, Kimm Karrip, Paul Truckel
Current market demands in conjunction with increased emission legislation's, have OEM’s striving to improve fuel economy and reduce CO2 emissions. One way to meet these demands, is through engine downsizing. Engine downsizing allows for reduced pumping and frictional losses. However, to maintain drivability, specifically in trucks and SUV's, power density increase through the addition of either a turbocharger or supercharger is necessary. Furthermore, engine efficiencies have been improved through reduced engine speed, paired with high gear count transmissions, providing an opportunity for manufactures to achieve desired drivability (strong acceleration coupled with fuel efficient high gears for cruising). With these advancements taken to improve engine/vehicle efficiency, gasoline turbo charge direct injected (GTDI) engines operate at low engine speeds with high torque output.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1026
Richard Morton, Romain Riviere, Stephen Geyer
A study of the crank and geartrain dynamics of a 2-stroke opposed piston diesel engine design uncovered a disconnect between the thermodynamic process and its conversion to mechanical work. The classic 2-stroke opposed piston design phases the intake piston to lag the exhaust piston in order to achieve favorable gas exchange, overcoming the disadvantage of piston-controlled ports. One result of this is that significantly more of the engine torque is delivered by the leading crank than from the trailing one. This paper will examine why this torque difference occurs, and show that it is not simply a proportioning of the available thermodynamic work, but a result of a fundamental mechanical loss mechanism that limits the achievable brake efficiency of this engine architecture. By providing an understanding of this loss mechanism, this analysis will provide a basis for developing effective design solutions to overcome it.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1089
Jose Grande, Julio Abraham Carrera, Manuel Dieguez Sr
Exhaust Gas Recirculation system (EGR) has been used for years for NOx emissions control in commercial vehicle applications. Emissions limits are tighter with every regulation while durability requirements are increasing, so EGR systems manufacturers must be able to provide high performance and robust designs even with high thermal loads. Commercial vehicle market is characterized by lower production rates than passenger car programs, but same engine has multiple applications with totally different engine calibrations. In some cases it is necessary to design two or more EGR systems for an engine platform, with the consequent impact on cost and development timeline. The optimal design of and EGR system needs to take into consideration several topics related with performance and durability: efficiency and pressure drop, fouling, boiling, thermal fatigue, vibrations, pressure fatigue and corrosion among others.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1023
Yaqun Jiang, C. Hsieh, Georg Festag, Masood Ahmed, William Jiang
Large axial displacement at the edge of a flywheel caused a clutch fail to disengage in high-speed rotation. To find out the root cause and solve the problem, a numerical procedure is proposed to investigate the vibration source and to understand dynamic behavior of the crank-train system. A simulation of the whole engine system including block, crankshaft, piston and connecting rod was performed with AVL/Excite. The baseline model was correlated with measurement. A comprehensive study was conducted for a set of flywheel and crankshaft models with different materials and unbalance masses. The contribution to flywheel wobbling of each vibration order was carefully investigated, and an optimal design was presented.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0250
Jizhou Zhang, Jianhua Zhou, Mian LI, Min Xu
To improve the system performance, precision manufacturing is required for production of the internal combustion engines (ICEs), a typical complex nonlinear system. Previous studies show that tolerances of critical dimensions have significant impacts on the engine performance. Among many critical factors, friction loss is one of the most important ones that affect the output performance of ICEs. It is necessary to recognize and control the tolerances which affect the friction loss. Of all the friction pairs for the engine, it is observed that the piston-cylinder friction pair and the bearing system take up nearly 70% of the total friction loss. In this work a novel multi-objective tolerance design optimization problem considering two friction systems mentioned above is proposed and solved. First two separated simulation models, the piston-cylinder and the bearing are built using AVL Excite Piston & Ring® and AVL Excite Power Unit®, respectively.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0366
Xingyu Liang, Yuesen Wang, Shuhe Huang, Guichun Yang, Lin Tang, Guoqi Cui
Due to the mechanical forces under high temperature and pressure conditions, the engine cylinders cross section will not be a round circle any more once they are installed. Therefore, both static and dynamic conditions can change the geometry of the cylinders. On the other hand, deformation of engine cylinder causes increasing lubricating oil consumption and abnormal wear, resulting of worse fuel economy and emissions. However, prediction of deformation on a liner has not been made because of the complication of conditions and structure. In this study, a V6 engine body model was built and meshed with Hypermesh suit software. Also, cylinder deformation under static condition has been simulated and analyzed. Basically, few parameters like pre-tightened force, structure and distribution of bolts have been investigated to figure out how the cylinder bore deformation behaves via finite element analysis. Also, a simple Matlab program had been developed to process the data.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1035
Xingyu Xue, John Rutledge
Diesel engine downsizing aimed at reducing fuel consumption while meeting stringent exhaust emissions regulations is currently in high demand. The boost system architecture plays an essential role in providing adequate air flow rate for diesel fuel combustion while avoiding impaired transient response of the downsized engine. Electric Turbocharger Assist (ETA) technology integrates an electric motor/generator with the turbocharger to provide electrical power to assist compressor work or to electrically recover excess turbine power. Additionally, a Variable geometry turbine (VGT) is able to bring an extra degree of freedom for the boost system optimization. The electrically-assisted turbocharger, coupled with VGT, provides an illuminating opportunity to increase the diesel engine power density and enhance the downsized engine transient response. This paper assesses the potential benefits of the electrically-assisted turbocharger with VGT to enable heavy-duty diesel engine downsizing.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-0634
Schoeffmann Wolfgang, Helfried Sorger, Siegfried Loesch, Wolfgang Unzeitig, Thomas Huettner, Alois Fuerhapter
In order to achieve future CO2 targets - in particular under real driving conditions - different powertrain technologies will have to be introduced. Beside the increasing electrification of the powertrain, the utilization of the full potential of the internal combustion engine will be essential. In addition to further optimization steps on the combustion processes, reduction of mechanical losses and thermal- and energetic system consideration the Variable Compression Ratio (VCR) is probably the single measure with the highest potential. VCR systems are expected to gain a considerable share in next generation turbocharged SI engines in certain vehicle classes. The basic principle of the AVL VCR system explained in the paper is a 2-stage variation of the connecting rod length and thus the compression ratio.
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1068
Jonathan Tigelaar, Krista Jaquet, David Cox, Albert Peter
Turbocharging is significantly changing design and control strategies for diesel and gasoline engines. This presentation will review new advances in the turbocharger speed measurement. Until recently, the highly accurate and fast turbocharger speed data, based on physical speed sensor signal, has been mainly used to safely decrease conservative safety margins for turbocharger speed and surge limits. In addition to significantly increased power and low end torque, new generation sensor technology is enabling revolutionary opportunities to utilize turbocharger speed data. Due to a new, state-of-art active eddy current based speed sensor technology, including a configurable high temperature ASIC, and the high accuracy and extremely fast delivery of turbocharger speed data, engine and turbocharger performance will benefit from improved control, advanced diagnostics and ability to virtualize other powertrain sensors (e.g. mass air flow and exhaust gas temperature sensors).
2017-03-28
Technical Paper
2017-01-1051
Hassan Nehme, Abdelkrim Zouani
Turbocharged engines constitute one of the strategies used by Ford Motor Company to deliver engines with improved fuel economy and performance. However, turbochargers exhibit many inherent NVH challenges that need to be addressed in order to deliver refined engines that meet customers’ expectations. One of these challenges is the turbocharger 1st order synchronous noise due to the interaction between the manufacturing tolerances of the rotating components and the dynamics of the rotor. This paper presents an analytical method to compute the turbocharger bearing forces and predict the 1st order synchronous noise and vibrations. The method consists of a fully coupled turbocharger rotor dynamic analysis in a flexible turbocharger housing structure; it predicts housing vibrations under various manufacturing tolerance conditions. The predicted vibrations of the turbocharger housing are compared to measured test data to demonstrate the validity of the analytical method.
2017-03-28
Journal Article
2017-01-0346
Radwan Hazime, Thomas Seifert, Jeremy Kessens, Frank Ju
Increasing the efficiency of heavy duty internal combustion engines is directly related to increasing specific power and, thus, increasing combustion pressure and temperature. One key component of the engine is the cylinder head which must withstand these higher temperatures and higher pressures. The path of increasing loads intensifies design conflicts, as e.g. associated with the fire deck of cylinder heads: the deck should be as thin as possible to avoid critical thermal stresses during the low frequency thermal transients but sufficiently thick to avoid failures due to the high frequency combustion pressure. A superficial solution of the design conflict is the usage of superior cast iron materials. Vermicular graphite cast iron show higher strength and fatigue resistance than the classically used lamellar graphite cast iron. However, due to their lower thermal conductivity, higher thermal stresses will arise.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 6769

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