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2015-08-04 ...
  • August 4-6, 2015 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
2015-06-24
Event
The diesel NVH session is focused on issues related to making diesel engines achieve better NVH characteristics. Topics include both analytical and experimental techniques for developing low noise diesel engines and components. Related topics covered in this session include linear and torsional vibration of diesel engines, as well as features intended to reduce diesel specific intake and exhaust noise problems, such as turbocharger whine.
2015-06-01 ...
  • June 1-5, 2015 (8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Engineering Academies
This Academy covers the diesel engine engineering principles and practices necessary to effectively understand a modern diesel engine. Types of engines addressed include naturally aspirated, turbocharged, pre-chamber, open chamber, light duty, and heavy duty. It is an intensive learning experience comprised of lecture and structured practical sessions, including a team-solved case study problem. Evening sessions are included. Attendees will receive a copy of the textbook, Diesel Emissions and Their Control, by lead instructor Magdi K. Khair and W. Addy Majewski.
2015-05-14 ...
  • May 14-15, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • October 19-20, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Stringent requirements of reduced NOx emission limits in the US have presented engineers and technical staff with numerous challenges. Several in-cylinder technical solutions have been developed for diesel engines to meet 2010 emission standards. These technologies have been optimized and have yielded impressive engine-out results in their ability to reduce emissions to extremely low levels. However, current and state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions have fallen short of achieving the limits imposed on diesel emissions for 2010.
2015-04-23
Event
Papers focusing on efficiency and emissions for classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both experimental and simulation results focused on applications of piston bowl design, heat transfer, and fuel injection, or other factors affecting fuel efficiency and engine-out emissions.
2015-04-23 ...
  • April 23-24, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • October 22-23, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Attendees to the seminars held in conjunction with the SAE 2015 World Congress will receive COMPLETE access to Congress activities for only $55 per day. If interested, please contact our Customer Service department at +1.877.606.7323 (U.S. and Canada only) or +1.724.776.4970 (outside U.S. and Canada) to register for this special Congress daily rate. Engines can and do experience failures in the field in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications.
2015-04-22
Event
Papers focusing on in-cylinder processes of classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both simulation results and experimental work, including applications of optical diagnostics, with emphasis on in-cylinder spray, evaporation, mixing, pollutant formation/destruction, or any other in-cylinder phenomena.
2015-04-22
Event
Papers focusing on in-cylinder processes of classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both simulation results and experimental work, including applications of optical diagnostics, with emphasis on in-cylinder spray, evaporation, mixing, pollutant formation/destruction, or any other in-cylinder phenomena.
2015-04-21
Event
Mixed mode with auto ignition but inhomogeneous charge. Injection-controlled but with EOI before SOC. Papers describing experiments and test data, simulation results focused on applications, fuel/additive effects, combustion control, and PPC injection strategies are invited and will be placed in appropriate sub-sessions. Papers with an emphasis on the modeling aspects of combustion are encouraged to be submitted into PFL110 or PFL120 modeling sessions.
2015-04-21
Event
Mixed mode with auto ignition but inhomogeneous charge. Injection-controlled but with EOI before SOC. Papers describing experiments and test data, simulation results focused on applications, fuel/additive effects, combustion control, and PPC injection strategies are invited and will be placed in appropriate sub-sessions. Papers with an emphasis on the modeling aspects of combustion are encouraged to be submitted into PFL110 or PFL120 modeling sessions.
2015-04-21
Event
Papers focusing on fuel and fuel additive effects on classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both experimental and simulation results focused on oxygenated or bio-derived fuels, alternative petroleum formulations, fuel blends, or any other fuel-related factors affecting engine performance and emissions.
2015-04-21
Event
Papers focusing on fuel and fuel additive effects on classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both experimental and simulation results focused on oxygenated or bio-derived fuels, alternative petroleum formulations, fuel blends, or any other fuel-related factors affecting engine performance and emissions.
2015-04-21
Event
This session covers topics regarding new CI and SI engines and components. This includes analytical, experimental, and computational studies covering hardware development as well as design and analysis techniques.
2015-04-21 ...
  • April 21-22, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
  • June 16-17, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Charlotte, North Carolina
  • August 24-25, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 8-9, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Attendees to the seminars held in conjunction with the SAE 2015 World Congress will receive COMPLETE access to Congress activities for only $55 per day. If interested, please contact our Customer Service department at +1.877.606.7323 (U.S. and Canada only) or +1.724.776.4970 (outside U.S. and Canada) to register for this special Congress daily rate. As diesel engines become more popular, a fundamental knowledge of diesel technology is critical for anyone involved in the diesel engine support industry.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1744
Jonathan M. S. Mattson, Chenaniah Langness, Christopher Depcik
The growth of hydraulic fracking has resulted in a dramatic cost reduction of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), a low carbon fuel. CNG cannot be used as singular fuel in conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines because of its high auto-ignition characteristics. However, CNG-assisted diesel combustion represents a means to shift the energy consumption of CI engines away from liquid fossil fuels. Calculation of the rate of heat release is vital for understanding and optimizing this mode of engine operation. A previously constructed three-zone equilibrium heat release model that is calibrated to engine exhaust hydrocarbon measurements was augmented in order to allow for the addition of CNG in the engine intake. The model was also adapted to permit reuse of unburned CNG gas with other exhaust species via exhaust gas recirculation. This is because experiments demonstrated a potentially dramatic increase in methane emissions under high CNG flow rates.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0803
Marko Jeftić, Jimi Tjong, Graham Reader, Meiping Wang, Ming Zheng
Experimental testing was done with a modern compression ignition engine to study the effect of the engine load and the effect of different fuels on the post injection characteristics. Two different fuels were utilized; ultra-low sulphur diesel and n-butanol. The results showed that a post injection can be an effective method for increasing the operating range of the engine load. Engine operation at high load can be limited by the peak cylinder pressure but the test results showed that an early post injection can increase the engine load without increasing the peak in-cylinder pressure. Neat butanol combustion may have a very high peak in-cylinder pressure and a very high peak pressure rise rate even at low load conditions. The test results showed that a butanol post injection can contribute to engine power without significantly affecting the peak pressure rise rate and the peak in-cylinder pressure.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0833
Buyu Wang, Zhi Wang, Shi-Jin Shuai, Jian-Xin Wang
A study of Multiple Premixed Compression Ignition (MPCI) with mixtures of gasoline and diesel is performed on a light-duty single cylinder diesel engine. The engine is operated at a speed of 1600rpm with the same fueling rate for different gasoline and diesel mixtures. By keeping the same intake pressure and EGR ratio, the influence of different blending ratios in gasoline and diesel mixtures are investigated. Commercial diesel is also tested as a reference. Combustion and emissions characteristics are compared by sweeping the first (-95 ~ --35 deg ATDC) and the second injection timing (-1 ~ 9 deg ATDC) with an injection split ratio of 82/18 and an injection pressure of 80MPa. The results show that compared with diesel combustion, the gasoline and diesel mixtures can reduce NOx and soot emissions simultaneously while maintaining or achieving even higher indicated thermal efficiency, but the HC and CO emissions are higher for the mixtures.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1745
Cemil Bekdemir, Rik Baert, Frank Willems, Bart Somers
Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) is a promising combustion concept in terms of controllability and load range compared to other high efficiency low pollutant emission concepts, such as Homogeneous and Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI/PCCI). Up to now, these RCCI strategies mainly rely on the combination of two liquid fuels: a diesel like and gasoline like fuel. Recently, this concept also became interesting from an operational cost perspective since one of the fuels can be natural gas (CNG). This is especially interesting for the partial substitution of diesel fuel in the heavy-duty market, as it bears the potential of decreasing CO2 and soot emissions on top of RCCI’s general potential of high thermal efficiency and low engine-out NOx emission. Engine control development requires fast models that capture the main features and trends of the processes.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0845
Prasad Divekar, Zhenyi Yang, David Ting, Xiang Chen, Ming Zheng, Jimi Tjong
Experimental investigation of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) cycles is conducted with diesel and ethanol fuels on a high compression ratio (18.2:1), common-rail diesel engine. Two LTC modes are studied; near-TDC injection of diesel with high intake charge dilution, and port injected ethanol ignited by direct injection of diesel with moderate exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Indicated mean effective pressure up to 10 bar in the diesel LTC mode and 17.6 bar in the dual-fuel LTC mode has been realized. While the NOx and smoke emissions are significantly reduced, a thermal efficiency penalty is observed from the test results. In this work, the efficiency penalty is attributed to increased HC and CO emissions and a non-conventional heat release pattern. The influence of heat release phasing, duration, and shape, on the indicated performance is explained with the help of parametric engine cycle simulations.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0989
Steve Schiller, Mark Brandl, Bruce Hoppenstedt, Korneel De Rudder
Diesel engine NOx emissions requirements have become increasingly stringent. Engine manufacturers have shown through the use of EGR and SCR technology that these requirements can be met. However, the demands for improved fuel efficiency, lower overall cost, and potential legislation to reduce NOx levels further increase the demand for higher DEF dosing rates. To meet this demand, a new DEF mixing technology has been developed. This paper describes the development of a compact, in-pipe mixer which utilizes an optimized wire mesh along with swirling flow to permit very high dosing rates without deposit formation while maintaining excellent mixing for high NOx reduction. Utilization of this technology makes it possible to reduce regeneration frequency, reduce the size of the SCR system, possibly eliminate the EGR system, and improve fuel efficiency through combustion enhancements.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0832
Christopher Kolodziej, Janardhan Kodavasal, Stephen Ciatti, Sibendu Som, Neeraj Shidore, Jeremy Delhom
For several years there has been a great deal of effort made in researching ways to run a compression ignition engine with simultaneously high efficiency and low emissions. Recently much of this work has been dedicated to using fuels that are more volatile and less reactive then conventional diesel fuel to allow the combustion to be more premixed. One of the key challenges to using fuels with such properties in a compression ignition engine is stable engine operation at low loads. This has especially been a challenge when using gasoline fuels which are already widely available. This paper provides an overview of how stable engine operation was achieved in gasoline compression ignition (GCI) on a multi-cylinder compression ignition engine using only 87 anti-knock index (AKI) gasoline.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0836
Behzad Rohani, Stephen Sungsan Park, Choongsik Bae
Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) is feasible only in lower load ranges so for the real world application of LTC, engine operation mode should frequently change back and forth from LTC mode in lower loads to conventional mode in higher loads. In this research, effect of injection strategy on smoothness and emissions of mode transition in a single cylinder heavy duty diesel engine is studied. The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) line was controlled by a servo-valve capable of opening or closing the EGR loop during only one engine cycle. Ten cycles after the EGR valve closure were taken as the transition period during which injection timing and quantity were shifted in various ways (i.e. injection strategies) and the effect on Indicated Mean Effective Pressure (IMEP) stability and emissions was studied.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1696
Federico Perini, Kan Zha, Stephen Busch, Paul Miles, Rolf D. Reitz
In this work computational and experimental approaches are combined to characterize in-cylinder flow structures and local flow field properties during operation of the Sandia 1.9L light-duty optical diesel engine. A full computational model of the single-cylinder research engine was used that considers the complete intake and exhaust runners and plenums, as well as the adjustable throttling devices used in the experiments to obtain different intake swirl ratios. The in-cylinder flow predictions were validated against an extensive set of planar PIV measurements at different vertical locations in the combustion chamber for different swirl ratio configurations. Principal Component Analysis was used to characterize precession, tilting and eccentricity, and regional averages of the in-cylinder turbulence properties in the squish region and the piston bowl.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0831
Wonah Park, Youngchul Ra, Eric Kurtz, Werner Willems, Rolf D. Reitz
The low temperature combustion concept is very attractive for reducing NOx and soot emissions in diesel engines. However, it has potential limitations due to higher combustion noise and CO and HC emissions. A multiple injection strategy is an effective way to reduce unburned emissions and noise in LTC. In this paper, the effect of multiple injection strategies was investigated to reduce combustion noise and unburned emissions in LTC conditions. A hybrid surrogate fuel model was developed and validated, and was used to improve LTC predictions. Triple injection strategies were considered to find the role of each pulse and then optimized. The split ratio of the 1st and 2nd pulses fuel was found to determine the ignition delay. Increasing mass of the 1st pulse reduced unburned emissions and an increase of the 3rd pulse fuel amount reduced noise. It is concluded that the pulse split ratio can be used as a control factor for emissions and noise.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1248
Timothy Broomhead, Chris Manzie, Michael Brear, Peter Hield
In the literature, a wide range of Mean Value Engine Models are used in the simulation and control of reciprocating engines. These models are often underpinned by a number of implicit assumptions, which determine the model structure and system states. As a result, systematic model reduction approaches have been developed in the literature, where high order models are reduced using singular perturbation techniques, eliminating states operating on irrelevant time-scales. This framework allows the elimination of high order states based on sufficiently small perturbation parameters, however a systematic method of identifying non-dimensional perturbation parameters has not yet been published. The development of a rigorous method to identify non-dimensional time scales present in the model is a natural and powerful extension to the existing approach.
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