Criteria

Text:
Display:

Results

Viewing 1 to 30 of 12032
2016-06-13 ...
  • June 13-17, 2016 (8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Engineering Academies
This Academy covers the diesel engine engineering principles and practices necessary to effectively understand a modern diesel engine. Types of engines addressed include naturally aspirated, turbocharged, pre-chamber, open chamber, light duty, and heavy duty. It is an intensive learning experience comprised of lecture and structured practical sessions, including a team-solved case study problem. Evening sessions are included. Attendees will receive a copy of the textbook, Diesel Emissions and Their Control, by lead instructor Magdi K. Khair and W. Addy Majewski.
2016-02-02 ...
  • February 2-4, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
  • August 2-4, 2016 (2 Sessions) - Live Online
Training / Education Online Web Seminars
This web seminar provides an in-depth overview of diesel engine noise including combustion and mechanical noise sources. In addition, the instructor will discuss a system approach to automotive integration including combining sub-systems and components to achieve overall vehicle noise and vibration goals.
2015-10-22 ...
  • October 22-23, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • March 16-17, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • September 29-30, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Engines can and do experience failures in the field in a variety of equipment, vehicles, and applications. On occasion, a single vehicle type or equipment family will even experience multiple engine failures leading to the inevitable need to determine what the most likely cause of one or all of those failures was. This comprehensive seminar introduces participants to the methods and techniques used to determine the most likely cause of an individual engine or group of engine failures in the field.
2015-10-19 ...
  • October 19-20, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • March 14-15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Stringent requirements of reduced NOx emission limits in the US have presented engineers and technical staff with numerous challenges. Several in-cylinder technical solutions have been developed for diesel engines to meet 2010 emission standards. These technologies have been optimized and have yielded impressive engine-out results in their ability to reduce emissions to extremely low levels. However, current and state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions have fallen short of achieving the limits imposed on diesel emissions for 2010.
2015-10-06
Event
This session covers advanced technologies and analysis/design/testing techniques related to powertrain performance, emissions, and electronic controls. Topics include system-level and component-level integration and optimization, emissions, fuel economy, combustion, air charging, EGR systems, fuel systems, valvetrains, engine brakes, waste heat recovery, calibration, steady-state and transient performance, engine/powertrain/drivetrain controls, model-based controls, sensors, OBD, and HIL.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2889
Saravana Venkatesh R, Sunil Pandey, Sathyanandan Mahadevan
In heavy duty diesel engines, Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is often preferred choice to contain NOx emissions. Critical to such EGR fitted engines is the design of air intake pipe and intake manifold combination in view of proper EGR gas mixing with intake air. The variation in EGR mass fraction at each intake ports should be as minimal as possible and this variation must be contained within +/- 10% band to have a minimal cylinder to cylinder variation of pollutants. EGR homogeneity for various intake configurations were studied using 3D CFD for a 4 cylinder 3.8 L diesel fuel, common rail system, turbocharged and intercooled heavy duty engine. Flow field was studied in the computational domain from the point before EGR mixing till all the four intake ports. EGR mass fraction variation at each intake port was calculated from this analysis after carrying out an experimental validation of the CFD model.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2805
Valerii Naumov, Yuri Pogulyaev, Rustam Baytimerov, Dmitry Chizhov
A new fuel injection system for a diesel engine is suggested that allows controlling the pressure of the pre- and post-main injections, and changing the pressure curve of the main injection. The system comprises a pump-injector unit with an independent pressure control and a needle. The driving cam of the pump-injector unit is designed so that the downward plunger speed is constant. Due to this fact, the pressure in the high-pressure chamber of the pump-injector unit may also be constant and adjustable by means of a piezoelectric pressure-regulating valve (PRV). The PRV connects the high-pressure chamber of the pump-injector unit with the fuel supply system (FSS). The passage area of the PRV depends on the voltage fed to the piezoelectric actuator. Thus, by varying the voltage, we can change the pressure in the high-pressure chamber. The needle of the pump-injector unit is controlled hydraulically by a two-position valve.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2821
Xuan Feng, Mahesh Madurai Kumar, Long-Kung Hwang, Travis Anderson, Justin Blomenberg
Diesel-electric powertrains are used by a variety of industrial machines and marine vessels. In such a powertrain configuration, a diesel engine coupled with an electrical generator provides power to electric motors that drive the application. Fuel consumption of such applications account for a majority of the operating cost, and even a small reduction in the percentage of fuel used can translate into considerable cost savings. Hence, methodologies and technologies that can deliver fuel economy improvements are a central focal point for many industries like mining haul trucks, locomotives and marine vessels. This paper describes an ALD methodology applicable to such machines. The case of a mining haul truck application has been used for purposes of illustration. A Matlab/Simulink based model has been developed at Cummins to represent a generic machine with diesel electric powertrain.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2809
Sajit Pillai, Julian LoRusso, Matthew Van Benschoten
Cylinder deactivation was evaluated both analytically and experimentally on a diesel engine. This paper evaluates cylinder deactivation for potential benefits in fuel consumption and exhaust thermal management for improved after treatment system performance. An analytical study was conducted using GT-Power to evaluate potential benefits of deactivation. The model was validated at low-load, steady-state points by optimizing Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) and Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) to maintain similar or acceptable emission levels between base and deactivated modes of operation. The results demonstrated significant improvements in Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC) for low and part load operating points along with higher exhaust gas temperatures. The analytical results offered enough potential benefit to warrant an experimental investigation. To validate the analytical results, an experimental evaluation was performed.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2807
Katharina Eichler, Yousef Jeihouni, Carl Ritterskamp
In the near future engine emitted carbon dioxides (CO2) are being limited for all vehicle categories with respect to the Green House Gases (GHG) norms. To cope with this challenge, new concepts need to be developed. For this reason waste heat recovery is a promising research field. For commercial vehicles the first phase of CO2 emission legislation will be introduced in the USA in 2014 and will be further tightened towards 2030. Beside the US, CO2 emission legislation for commercial engines will also be introduced in Europe in the near future. The demanded CO2 reduction calls for a better fuel economy which is also of interest for the end user, specifically for the owners of heavy duty diesel vehicles with high mileages. To meet these future legislation objectives, a waste heat recovery system is a beneficial solution to recover the wasted energies from different heat sources in the engine.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2880
Fabio Luz Almeida, Philip Zoldak, Marcos de Mattos Pimenta, Pedro Teixeira Lacava
The use of numerical simulations in the development processes of engineering products has been more frequent, since it enables us to predict premature failures and to study new promising and valuable concepts. In industry, numerical simulation usually has the function of reducing the necessary number of validation tests before spending huge amount of resources on alternatives with less chance to succeed. In the context of an economically committed country, the matter of cargo transportation is of great importance, since it affects the trading of consumer goods between cities, states and their flow towards exportation. Thus, the internal combustion (ICE) Diesel cycle engines play an important role in Brazil, since they are extensively used in automotive applications and commercial cargo transportation, mainly due to their relevant advantage in fuel consumption and reliability.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2806
Sam Barros, William Atkinson, Naag Piduru
Introducing water in a diesel engine has been known to decrease peak combustion temperatures and decrease NOx emissions. This however has been limited to stationary and marine applications due to the requirement of a separate water tank and thereby a two-tank system. Combustion of hydrocarbon fuels produce between 1.35 and 2.55 times their mass in water. Techniques for extracting this water from the exhaust flow of an engine have been pursued by the United States department of defense (DOD) for quite some time, as they can potentially reduce the burden of having to supply front line troops with drinking water. Such a technology could also be of value to engine manufacturers as it could enable water injection for performance, efficiency and emissions benefits without the drawbacks of a two-tank system.
2015-09-29
Technical Paper
2015-01-2791
Srinivas Anantharaman, Manoj B
Nozzles tip Temperature (NTT) of an injector is a critical parameter for an engine as far as reliability of engine is concerned. It is required to ensure that the injectors operate under its operational limit because higher operating temperatures would result in enlargement of the nozzle spray tip, resulting in higher through flow, producing more undesirable power. This could result in failure of other components in the engine. In this paper we identify the various parameters that are critical for NTT and thereby predict the NTT by having the known input parameters. Response surface methodology and artificial neural network are used to identify the parameters, estimate the significance of each parameter and predict the NTT. Based on this analysis, even without the use of an instrumented injector NTT can be predicted at various working conditions of the vehicle on different terrains.
2015-09-28 ...
  • September 28, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • April 15, 2016 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Detroit, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The improved efficiencies of the modern diesel engine have led to its increased use within the mobility industry. The vast majority of these diesel engines employ a high-pressure common rail fuel injection system to increase the engine's fuel-saving potential, emissions reduction, and overall performance. This one-day seminar will begin with a review of the basic principles of diesel engines and fuel injection systems. Diesel and alternative fuels will be discussed, followed by current and emerging diesel engine applications.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2418
Zheming Li, Xin Yu, Guillaume Lequien, Ted Lind, Marcis Jansons, Oivind Andersson, Mattias Richter
Abstract The presence of OH radicals as a marker of the high temperature reaction region usually has been used to determine the lift-off length (LOL) in diesel engines. Both OH Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and OH* chemiluminescence diagnostics have been widely used in optical engines for measuring the LOL. OH* chemiluminescence is radiation from OH being formed in the exited states (OH*). As a consequence OH* chemiluminescence imaging provides line-of-sight information across the imaged volume. In contrast, OH-LIF provides information on the distribution of radicals present in the energy ground state. The OH-LIF images only show OH distribution in the thin cross-section illuminated by the laser. When both these techniques have been applied in earlier work, it has often been reported that the chemiluminescence measurements result in shorter lift-off lengths than the LIF approach.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2425
Mario Milanese, Ilario Gerlero, Carlo Novara, Giuseppe Conte, Maurizio Cisternino, Carmen Pedicini, Vincenzo Alfieri l, Stefano Mosca
Emission requirements for diesel engines are becoming increasingly strict, leading to the increase of engine architecture complexity. This evolution requires a more systematic approach in the development of control systems than presently adopted, in order to achieve improved performances and reduction of times and costs in design, implementation and calibration. To this end, large efforts have been devoted in recent years to the application of advanced Model-Based MIMO control systems. In the present paper a new MIMO nonlinear feedback control is proposed, based on an innovative data-driven method, which allows to design the control directly from the experimental data acquired on the plant to be controlled. Thus, the proposed control design does not need the intermediate step of a reliable plant model identification, as required by Model-Based methods.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2438
Maria Founti, Yannis Hardalupas, Christopher Hong, Christos Keramiotis, Kumara Gurubaran Ramaswamy, Nikolaos Soulopoulos, Alexander Taylor, Dimitrios P. Touloupis, George Vourliotakis
The present work investigates the effect of low levels CO2 addition on the combustion characteristics inside a single cylinder optical engine operated under low load conditions. The effects of dilution levels (up to 7.5% mass flow rate CO2 addition), the number of pilot injections (single or double pilot injections) and injection pressure (25 or 40 MPa), are evaluated towards the direction of achieving a partially premixed combustion (PPC) operation mode. The findings are discussed based on optical measurements and via pressure trace and apparent rate of heat release analyses in a Ricardo Hydra optical light duty diesel engine. The engine was operated under low IMEP levels of the order of 1.6 bar at 1200 rpm and with a CO2 diluent-enhanced atmosphere resembling an environment of simulated low exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rates. Flame propagation is captured by means of high speed imaging and OH, CH and C2 line-of-sight chemiluminescence respectively.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2470
Daniel Pearce, Yannis Hardalupas, A.M.K.P Taylor
The measurement of the rate of fuel injection using a constant volume, fluid filled chamber and measuring the pressure change as a function of time due to the injected fluid (the so called “Zeuch” method) is an industry standard due to its simple theoretical underpinnings. Such a measurement device is useful to determine key timing and quantity parameters for injection system improvements to meet the evolving requirements of emissions, power and economy. This study aims to further the understanding of the nature of cavitation which could occur in the near nozzle region under these specific conditions of liquid into liquid injection using high pressure diesel injectors for heavy duty engines. The motivation for this work is to better understand the temporal signature of the pressure signals that arise in a typical injection cycle.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2477
Ezio Mancaruso, Renato Marialto, Luigi Sequino, Bianca Maria Vaglieco, Massimo Cardone
Abstract Blends of propane-diesel fuel can be used in direct injection diesel engines to improve the air-fuel mixing and the premixed combustion phase, and to reduce pollutant emissions. The potential benefits of usinf propane in diesel engines are both environmental and economic; furthermore, its use does not require changes to the compression ratio of conventional diesel engines. The present paper describes an experimental investigation of the injection process for different liquid preformed blends of propane-diesel fuel in an optically accessible Common Rail diesel engine. Slight modifications of the injection system were required in order to operate with a blend of propane-diesel fuel. Pure diesel fuel and two propane-diesel mixtures at different mass ratios were tested (20% and 40% in mass of propane named P20 and P40). First, injection in air at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure were performed to verify the functionality of the modified Common Rail injection system.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2483
Thangaraja Jeyaseelan, Pramod S Mehta
The replacement of fossil diesel with neat biodiesel in a compression ignition engine has advantage in lowering unburned hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide and smoke emissions. However, the injection advance experienced with biodiesel fuel with respect to diesel injection setting increases oxides of nitrogen emission. In this study, the biodiesel-NO control is attempted using charge and fuel modification strategies with retarded injection timing. The experiments are performed at maximum torque speed and higher loads viz. from 60% up to full load conditions maintaining same power between diesel and biodiesel while retarding the timing of injection by 3 deg. crank angle. The charge and fuel modifications are done by recycling 5% by volume of exhaust gas to the fresh charge and 10% by volume of methanol to Karanja biodiesel.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2484
Enrico Mattarelli, Carlo Alberto Rinaldini
Abstract The third generation of biodiesels, derived from microalgae, is one of the most interesting options for the replacement of fossil fuels. While the use of first generation biodiesels on different types of compression ignition engines is well documented in the open literature, much less information is available on algal fuels. As a matter of fact, the influence on combustion and pollutant emissions is not definitively assessed, depending on the combination of the specific features of both fuel and engine. The aim of this paper is to analyze the combustion process in a small industrial engine fueled by an algal Biodiesel, blended with standard Diesel fuel. The blend composition is the one typically used in most applications, i.e. 20% of biodiesel and 80% of Diesel (B20).
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2388
Jordan Rudloff, Alessio Dulbecco, Gregory Font
New generation Diesel engine becoming increasingly complex to be able to satisfy the always severer constraints on pollutant emissions, during the calibration phase of the engine, manufacturers have to account for a large number of variables to reach their targets expressed in terms of drivability, fuel consumption, in-cylinder pollutant emissions. Furthermore, due to the increasingly synergy between engine combustion chamber and exhaust after-treatment technologies, it is essential to consider global optimization approaches to obtain optimum conditions to meet high conversion efficiencies in after-treatment systems. In that context, engine system simulation approaches are very flexible tools that allow to create virtual innovative powertrains and perform, in a quite short time and with reduced cost, a large number of tests over a wide range of operating conditions. Moreover, they give access to detailed physical information, which is not easily available from experiments.
2015-09-06
Journal Article
2015-24-2389
Mirko Baratta, Roberto Finesso, Daniela Misul, Ezio Spessa
The potential of internal EGR (iEGR) and external EGR (eEGR) in reducing the engine-out NOx emissions in a heavy-duty diesel engine has been investigated by means of a refined 1D fluid-dynamic engine model developed in the GT-Power environment. The engine is equipped with Variable Valve Actuation (VVA) and Variable Geometry Turbocharger (VGT) systems. The activity was carried out in the frame of the CORE (CO2 Reduction for Long Distance Transport) Collaborative Project of the European Community, VII FP. The engine model integrates an innovative 0D predictive combustion model for the simulation of the HRR (heat release rate), which is based on the accumulated fuel mass approach, and a multi-zone thermodynamic model for the simulation of the in-cylinder temperatures. NOx emissions are calculated by means of the Zeldovich thermal and prompt mechanisms.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2394
Fadila Maroteaux, Charbel Saad, Fabrice Aubertin, Pauline Canaud
Mainly due to environmental regulation, future Engine Control Unit (ECU) will be equipped with in-cylinder pressure sensors. The introduction of this innovative solution has increased the number of involved variables, requiring an unceasing improvement in the modeling approaches and in the computational capabilities of Engine Control Unit (ECU). Hardware in the Loop (HIL) test system therefore has to provide in-cylinder pressure in real time from an adequate model. This paper describes a synthesis of our study targeted to the development of in-cylinder crank angle combustion model excluding look up tables, dedicated to HIL test bench. The main objective of the present paper is a comprehensive analysis of a reduced combustion model, applied to a direct injection Diesel engine at varying engine operating range, including single injection and multi injection strategies.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2395
Xavier Tauzia, Alain Maiboom, Guanqin Ma
In this paper, a new 1D combustion model is presented. It is expected to combine good predictive capacities with a contained CPU time, and could be used for engine design. It relies on a eulerian approach, based on Musculus 1D transient spray model. The latter has been extended to model vaporizing, reacting sprays. The general features of the model are first presented. Then various sub models (spray angle and dilatation, vaporization, thermodynamic properties) are detailed. Chemical kinetics are described with a global scheme to keep computational time low. The spray discretization (mesh) and angle model are first discussed through a sensitivity analysis. The model results are then compared to experiments from ECN data base (SANDIA) realized in constant volume bombs, for both inert and reacting cases. Some detailed analysis of model results are performed, including comparisons of vaporizing and non-vaporizing cases, as well as inert and reacting cases.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2406
Gyujin Kim, Kyoungdoug Min
Abstract The flamelet model is a widely used combustion model that demonstrates a good prediction of non-premixed combustion. In this model, the chemical time scales are considered to be smaller compared to those of the turbulence, which allows the heat and mass transfer equation to be decoupled from the flow equation. However, the model's dependency on the mixture fraction limits the combustion analysis to a single injection. To overcome this limitation, a two dimensional flamelet model, which uses two mixture fraction variables, was introduced to represent the non-premixed combustion of multiple injections. However, the model's computational time drastically increased due to the expansion of the solution domain. Thus, a modified 2-D flamelet model was introduced to reduce the computational time of the two dimensional flamelet model.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2400
Andrea Matrisciano, Anders Borg, Cathleen Perlman, Harry Lehtiniemi, Michal Pasternak, Fabian Mauss
In this work a soot source term tabulation strategy for soot predictions under Diesel engine conditions within the zero-dimensional Direct Injection Stochastic Reactor Model (DI-SRM) framework is presented. The DI-SRM accounts for detailed chemistry, in-homogeneities in the combustion chamber and turbulence-chemistry interactions. The existing implementation [1] was extended with a framework facilitating the use of tabulated soot source terms. The implementation allows now for using soot source terms provided by an online chemistry calculation, and for the use of a pre-calculated flamelet soot source term library. Diesel engine calculations were performed using the same detailed kinetic soot model in both configurations. The chemical mechanism for n-heptane used in this work is taken from Zeuch et al. [2] and consists of 121 species and 973 reactions including PAH and thermal NO chemistry. The engine case presented in [1] is used also for this work.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2398
Ivan Arsie, Roberto Di Cianni, Rocco Di Leo, Cesare Pianese, Matteo De Cesare
Abstract Nowadays the high competition reached by the automotive market forces Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) towards innovative solutions. Strict emission standards and fuel economy targets make the work hard to be accomplished. Therefore modern engines feature complex architecture and embed new devices for Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR), turbocharging (e.g. multi-stage compressors), gas after-treatment (e.g. the Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR)) and fuel injection (either high or low pressure). In this context the Engine Management System (EMS) plays a fundamental role to optimize engine operation. The paper deals with fuel spray and combustion simulation by a multi-zone phenomenological model aimed at the steady-state optimal tuning of the injection pattern.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2396
Philippe Moreau, Patricia Valerio, Alain Brillard, Valerie Tschamber, Jean-Francois Brilhac, Yves Hohl, Regis Vonarb, L. Germanese, B. Courtalon
Abstract We present an experimental and modelling methodology developed at LGRE research laboratory to characterize soot oxidation in the presence of different atmospheres (NO2, NO2/O2), simulating passive regeneration which occur in a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). Based on this methodology which aims at deriving the kinetic parameters for soot combustion, the thermal reactivity of different soot has been studied and compared. Soot were produced from a prototype Liebherr engine and on an engine dynamometer at R&D Moteurs company, under two engine cycles and for two different fuels. Small soot masses (15-30mg) were deposited on the quartz frit of the reactor and submitted to a gas flow (NO2 or NO2/O2), under different temperatures. The mole fractions of NO2, NO, CO2 and CO at the reactor outflow were measured by infrared analyzers. The soot oxidation rate and the sample remaining mass were deduced from CO/CO2 emissions.
2015-09-06
Technical Paper
2015-24-2516
Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Daniel Schreiber
Particulate matter (PM)in diesel exhaust is captured in diesel particulate filters (DPFs). Since increased PM load in the filter and thus increased pressure drop across the filter deteriorates the engine performance, the filter load of the DPF has to be removed during a process referred to as regeneration. Measures for successful regeneration aim at accelerating soot oxidation and increase fuel consumption. Regeneration lay-out and thus fuel consumption increase is strongly depending on the oxidation behavior of soot. The aim of the present study is the investigation of soot oxidation characteristics. Therefore particle filters have been loaded with soot using the exhaust gas of small heavy duty vehicle operated under defined conditions on an engine dynamometer. The particle filters have been then dismantled and fragmented on their constituting segments. Each filter segment has been regenerated individually in a specifically designed test bench.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 12032

Filter

  • Range:
    to:
  • Year: