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Viewing 1 to 30 of 2429
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2134
Tom Currie, Dan Fuleki
There is significant recent evidence that ice crystals ingested by a jet engine at high altitude can partially melt and then accrete within the forward stages of the compressor, potentially producing a loss of performance, rollback, combustor flameout, compressor damage, etc. Several studies of this ice crystal icing (ICI) phenomenon have been conducted in the past 5 years using the RATFac (Research Altitude Test Facility) altitude chamber at the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC), which includes an icing wind tunnel capable at operating at Mach numbers (M), total pressures (po) and temperatures (To) pertinent to ICI. Humidity can also be controlled and ice particles are generated with a grinder. The ice particles are entrained in a jet of sub-freezing air blowing into the tunnel inlet. Warm air from the altitude cell also enters the tunnel, where it mixes with the cold ice-laden jet, increasing the wet-bulb temperature (Twb) and inducing particle melting.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2133
Joseph P. Veres, Scott M. Jones, Philip C. E. Jorgenson
The Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL), an altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center, has been used to test a full scale turbine engine at simulated altitude operating conditions. The PSL test facility has the capability to create a continuous cloud of ice crystals that are ingested by the engine during operation at simulated altitudes. The PSL tests successfully duplicated the icing events that were experienced by this engine during flight through ice crystal clouds. During testing at the PSL, after the ice cloud was turned on, key engine performance parameters responded immediately due to ingestion of the ice crystals. The points where the performance deteriorated with time have been attributed to ice accretion in the low pressure compressor. Eight data points were analyzed in order to gain understanding of key transient engine performance parameters. Examination of the test data showed two distinct responses in the engine once the ice cloud was initiated.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2107
Tom Currie, Craig Davison, Dan Fuleki
There is significant recent evidence that ice crystals ingested by a jet engine at high altitude can partially melt and then accrete within the forward stages of the compressor, potentially producing a loss of performance, rollback, combustor flameout, compressor damage, etc. Several studies of this ice crystal icing (ICI) phenomenon have been conducted in the past 5 years using the RATFac (Research Altitude Test Facility) altitude chamber at the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC), which includes an icing wind tunnel capable at operating at Mach numbers (M), total pressures (po) and temperatures (To) pertinent to ICI. Humidity can also be controlled and ice particles are generated with a grinder. The ice particles are entrained in a jet of sub-freezing air blowing into the tunnel inlet. Warm air from the altitude cell also enters the tunnel, where it mixes with the cold ice-laden jet, increasing the wet-bulb temperature (Twb) and inducing particle melting.
2015-06-15
Technical Paper
2015-01-2146
Matthew Feulner, Shengfang Liao, Becky Rose, Xuejun Liu
Matt Feulner, Shengfang Liao, Becky Rose and Xuejun Liu Pratt & Whitney, United Technologies Corporation A through-flow based Monte Carlo particle trajectory simulation is used to calculate the ice crystal paths in the low pressure compressor of a high bypass ratio turbofan engine. The trajectory model includes a statistical ice particle breakup model due to impact on the engine surfaces. Stage-by-stage ice water content, particle size and particle velocity distributions are generated at multiple flight conditions and engine power conditions. The simulation results prompt the need to properly set up boundary conditions for component or cascade testing.
2015-03-11
WIP Standard
ARP4755C
This paper describes a recommended practice and procedure for the correlation of test cells that are used for the performance testing of turboprop and turboshaft engines. This Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) shall apply to both dynamometer and propeller based testing. Test cell correlation is performed to determine the effect of any given test cell enclosure and equipment on the performance of an engine relative to the baseline performance of that engine.
2015-03-11
WIP Standard
AS7477F
This document covers bolts and screws made from a corrosion and heat resistant, precipitation hardenable iron base alloy of the type identified under the Unified Numbering System as UNS S66286. The following specification designations and their properties are covered: AS7477: 130 ksi minimum ultimate tensile strength at room temperature 70 ksi stress-rupture strength at 1200 °F; and AS7477-1: Inactive for Design; AS7477-2: 130 ksi minimum ultimate tensile strength at room temperature 78 ksi minimum ultimate shear strength at room temperature. Classification: 130 ksi minimum tensile strength at room temperature 1200 °F maximum test temperature of parts.

Primarily for aerospace propulsion system applications where a good combination of fatigue resistance, tensile strength, shear strength, and resistance to relaxation at elevated temperatures is required.

2015-03-04
WIP Standard
AS3547A
No scope available.
2015-03-04
WIP Standard
AS3550A
No scope available.
2015-02-23
WIP Standard
AIR1273B
This SAE Aerospace Information Report establishes a positive identification of the functions and, if applicable, the hazards and direction of flow of pipe, hose, tube, or electrical conduit lines.
2015-02-02
Standard
AS13001
The standard applies to aero engine suppliers operating a self-release process as a delegated activity from the delegating organization. While primarily developed around the aero engine supply chain requirements, this standard can also be used in other industry sectors where a self-release process may be of benefit.
2015-01-15
Standard
AS6502
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides classical propulsion system performance parameter names for aircraft propulsion systems and their derivatives, and describes the logical framework by which new names can be constructed. The contents of this document were, originally, a subset of AS755E. Due to the growing complexity of station numbering schemes described in AS755, and a desire to expand the original document's nomenclature section to include a fuller representation of "classical" (legacy use) names, a decision was made to separate its "station numbering" and "nomenclature" content into two separate documents. This document, then, was created using the "nomenclature" half of AS755E. Both documents will continue to be improved and revised as industry needs dictate. The parameter naming conventions presented herein are for use in all communications concerning propulsion system performance such as computer programs, data reduction, design activities, and published documents.
2014-12-12
Standard
AS755F
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) provides a performance station designation system for aircraft propulsion systems and their derivatives. The station numbering conventions presented herein are for use in all communications concerning propulsion system performance such as computer programs, data reduction, design activities, and published documents. They are intended to facilitate calculations by the program user without unduly restricting the method of calculation used by the program supplier. The contents of this document were previously a subset of AS755E. Due to the growing complexity of station numbering schemes and an industry desire to expand nomenclature descriptions, a decision was made to separate the “station numbering” and “nomenclature” contents of AS755 into two separate documents. AS755 will continue to maintain standards for station numbering. SAE Aerospace Standard AS6502 will maintain standards for classical nomenclature moving forward.
2014-12-10
WIP Standard
AS7460B
This procurement specification covers aircraft-quality bolts and screws made of 6.0Al 4.0V titanium alloy and of 160 ksi tensile strength at room temperature. Primarily for aerospace propulsion system applications where high strength, light weight fasteners are required for use up to approximately 600 °F.
2014-12-07
WIP Standard
AS9808A
No scope available.
2014-12-06
WIP Standard
AS7220A
This procurement specification covers rivets fabricated from an aluminum alloy designated as 1100-H14, strain hardened. Primarily for joining aluminum parts where a low shear strength is adequate.
2014-12-06
WIP Standard
AS7454B
This procurement specification covers aircraft quality bolts and screws made from a low alloy, heat resistant steel of the type identified under the Unified Numbering System as UNS K14675. AS7454 ~ 135 000 psi ultimate tensile strength at room temperture. AS7454-1 ~ 135 000 psi ultimate tensile strength at room temperture, nickel-cadmium plated.

Primarily for aerospace propulsion system applications where good strength at temperatures up to approximately 900 °F is required and the part is protected against corrosion.

2014-12-06
WIP Standard
AS9589A
No scope available.
2014-12-06
WIP Standard
AS9806A
No scope available.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 2429

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