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Training / Education
2015-06-26
Most muffler design in the automotive industry is accomplished by using "cut-and-try" methods that rely on what has worked in the past and/or extensive full-scale testing on engines for validation. New computer software aimed at muffler design can shorten the design cycle and yield more effective results. This four hour seminar provides an introduction to the behavior of mufflers and silencers including a description of the two-port approach to muffler design. This seminar covers the acoustic simulation of muffler and silencer systems and the use of experimental methods to measure muffler performance.
Event
2015-06-22
This session covers experimental, computational, and analytical efforts related to the basic mechanisms and control techniques of noise and vibration in the breathing system (induction, combustion chamber, and exhaust) of naturally aspirated and supercharged/turbocharged engines. Noise sources include airborne, flow, flow‐acoustic and flow‐structure coupling.
Training / Education
2015-04-20
As diesel emissions regulations have become more and more stringent, diesel particulate filters (DPF) have become possibly the most important and complex diesel aftertreatment device. This seminar covers many DPF-related topics using fundamentals from various branches of applied sciences such as porous media, filtration and materials sciences and will provide the student with both a theoretical as well as an applications-oriented approach to enhance the design and reliability of aftertreatment platforms. Structure, geometry, composition, performance, applications and optimizations of DPFs are some of the main topics covered in this advanced level seminar.
Training / Education
2015-03-23
Heat transfer affects the performance, emissions and durability of the engine as well as the design, packaging, material choice and fatigue life of vehicle components. This course covers the broad range of heat transfer considerations that arise during the design and development of the engine and the vehicle with a primary focus on computational models and experimental validation covering the flow of heat from its origin in the engine cylinders and its transfer via multiple paths through engine components. Specifically, the course will cover heat transfer design considerations related to the following: engine cooling and lubrication systems as well as bay-to-bay breathing; exhaust system and after-treatment components; tail pipe gas temperatures, as well as thermal interactions between the engine and its exhaust system with the components in the vehicle under-hood and under-body; turbochargers; passenger cabin HVAC system, including windshield de-icing; battery cooling; heat exchangers and challenges associated with predicting thermal mechanical fatigue life of components.
Event
2014-12-09
Event
2014-12-09
Event
2014-12-09
Lean NOx Trap (LNT) is one of the two NOx control technologies for diesel cars. However, LNT generates high levels of H2S during its desulfation process. We have successfully developed an advanced CSF technology that can effectively control the H2S emission and at the same time maintain its oxidation function for CO/HC. We will show engine and lab data for LNT+CSF system, discuss the chemistry for H2S control and illustrate the functional principle for CSF design.
Event
2014-12-09
The Tier-III and LEV-III fleet emission rollout is reviewed with the federal fuel economy standards. An emission rollout is generated compliant to the light duty LEV-III emission regulations to 2025. PGM loadings are estimated for the fleet based on current 4 cylinder Bin-4 and PZEV applications. Pd and Rh loadings will increase as the fleet average approaches SULEV30 in 2025. Non-traditional technologies such as HC trap and SCR catalyst may find a market.
Event
2014-12-09
The proposed legislative requirements on particle number emissions for EU6c and the reduced particle mass emission limits of CARB LEV-III / EPA Tier-3 pose a new challenge in the development of gasoline direct injection engines. Bosch is actively pursuing system level solutions, including the development of next generation DI injection systems, to aid OEMs in meeting the new legislative requirements without the need for additional exhaust gas after-treatment or penalties in fuel economy. This presentation will highlight key development areas and show system level pathways to successfully address these challenges.
Event
2014-12-09
In order to meet the future US 2025 CAFE standards, the average fuel economy of automobiles has to increase dramatically. Many OEM’s have a positive outlook towards considering highly efficient light-duty diesel powertrains as one possibility to reach the fleet average fuel economy goals. According to many market sales indicators, the annual sales of light-duty diesel vehicles in North America will reach nearly 1 million units by 2018. This growing emphasis for light-duty diesel powertrains has drawn attention to how the emission control technologies can be tailored to best meet the LEV III emissions standards, while still maintaining a high fuel economy advantage over their gasoline counterparts. In this presentation, beginning with a quick discussion about motivation, an in-depth technical analysis about future light-duty diesel engine and aftertreatment configurations will be discussed. The presentation primarily focuses on the challenges associated with advanced aftertreatment systems in combination with lower engine out emissions that are necessary to meet LEV III standards while maintaining high fuel economy.
Event
2014-12-09
Gasoline particulate filters (GPFs) are being developed to enable compliance with the Euro 6c particulate number limit for gasoline direct injection engines. Applying a precious metal containing coating to the GPF has been found to improve soot combustion, enabling better passive regeneration under typical driving conditions. Furthermore, examples will demonstrate how coating the GPF with a three-way catalyst also provides benefits including system compactness and improved conversion efficiencies under transient and high speed driving conditions. The effects of PGM content and washcoat design on soot combustion and conversion activity will be discussed.
Event
2014-12-09
Lube oil-driven ash is inevitable for particulate filters and thus the filters need to be designed in consideration of ash loading. Since passive soot oxidation occurs at a high exhaust temperature range in GPF, ash behaviors in GPF are distinct from DPF. Our studies have shown that soot oxidation reactivity increases proportionally with increasing ash content in soot. The effect of ash loading on GPF pressure drop, filtration efficiency, and passive soot oxidation will be discussed.
Training / Education
2014-11-06
Stringent requirements of reduced NOx emission limits in the US have presented engineers and technical staff with numerous challenges. Several in-cylinder technical solutions have been developed for diesel engines to meet 2010 emission standards. These technologies have been optimized and have yielded impressive engine-out results in their ability to reduce emissions to extremely low levels. However, current and state-of-the-art in-cylinder solutions have fallen short of achieving the limits imposed on diesel emissions for 2010. To help meet emissions requirements, the catalyst industry has developed exhaust emission reduction technologies with impressive levels of performance.
Event
2014-10-16
Event
2014-10-15
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Isaline Lefort, Jose Herreros, Athanasios Tsolakis
Abstract This study investigates the potential of using a partial flow filter (PFF) to assist a wall flow diesel particulate filter (DPF) and reduce the need for active regeneration phases that increase engine fuel consumption. First, the filtration efficiency of the PFF was studied at several engine operating conditions, varying the filter space velocity (SV), through modification of the exhaust gas flow rate, and engine-out particulate matter (PM) concentration. The effects of these parameters were studied for the filtration of different particle size ranges (10-30 nm, 30-200 nm and 200-400 nm). For the various engine operating conditions, the PFF showed filtration efficiency over 25% in terms of PM number and mass. The PFF filtration behaviour was also investigated at idle engine operation producing a high concentration of nuclei particulates for which the filter was able to maintain 60% filtration efficiency. After a 14 hour soot loading phase, the filter trapping efficiency remained over 20% and showed unexpectedly high small PM filtration efficiency.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Achinta Varna, Konstantinos Boulouchos, Alexander Spiteri, Panayotis Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, Yuri M. Wright
Simulations for a pressure-assisted multi-stream injector designed for urea-dosing in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) exhaust gas system have been carried out and compared to measurements taken in an optically accessible high-fidelity flow test rig. The experimental data comprises four different combinations of mass flow rate and temperature for the gas stream with unchanged injection parameters for the spray. First, a parametric study is carried out to determine the importance of various spray sub-models, including atomization, spray-wall interaction, buoyancy as well as droplet coalescence. Optimal parameters are determined using experimental data for one reference operating condition. The model is subsequently applied to all operating conditions with unaltered parameters and validated by means of the measured droplet velocity fields, droplet diameter distributions and spray-tip propagations which have been characterized by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) and shadow imaging.
Technical Paper
2014-10-13
Kenan Muric, Ola Stenlaas, Per Tunestal, Bengt Johansson
In the last couple of decades, countries have enacted new laws concerning environmental pollution caused by heavy-duty commercial and passenger vehicles. This is done mainly in an effort to reduce smog and health impacts caused by the different pollutions. One of the legislated pollutions, among a wide range of regulated pollutions, is nitrogen oxides (commonly abbreviated as NOx). The SCR (Selective Catalytic Reduction) was introduced in the automotive industry to reduce NOx emissions leaving the vehicle. The basic idea is to inject a urea solution (AdBlue™) in the exhaust gas before the gas enters the catalyst. The optimal working temperature for the catalyst is somewhere in the range of 300 to 400 °C. For the reactions to occur without a catalyst, the gas temperature has to be at least 800 °C. These temperatures only occur in the engine cylinder itself, during and after the combustion. In this paper a study is presented where a second injector is installed in a Scania D13 cylinder head for urea injection purposes.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Xinyu Ge, Yongli Qi, Kai Zhang
Fuel properties impact the engine-out emission directly. For some geographic regions where diesel engines can meet emission regulations without aftertreatment, the change of fuel properties will lead to final tailpipe emission variation. Aftertreatment systems such as Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) and Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) are required for diesel engines to meet stringent regulations. These regulations include off-road Tier 4 Final emission regulations in the USA or the corresponding Stage IV emission regulations in Europe. As an engine with an aftertreatment system, the change of fuel properties will also affect the system conversion efficiency and regeneration cycle. Previous research works focus on prediction of engine-out emission, and many are based on chemical reactions. Due to the complex mixing, pyrolysis and reaction process in heterogeneous combustion, it is not cost-effective to find a general model to predict emission shifting due to fuel variation. Some empirical models use testing data as input to locate relationships between controlled inputs and engine response.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Manfei Bai, Gangfeng Tan, Yadong Deng, Wenying Wang, Hui Yan
Abstract To make full use of engine exhaust heat and further improve the utilization of the energy efficiency of the heavy truck, thermoelectric module is used to contribute to thermoelectric power generation. The hot-end temperature of the module varies with the engine operating condition because it is connected with the exhaust pipe. The cold-end of the thermoelectric module is mainly cooled by engine cooling system. Increasing the temperature difference between the hot-end and cold-end of the thermoelectric module is a good way to improve the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. For the poor controllability of the hot-end temperature of the thermoelectric module, this study puts forward by lowering the cold-end temperature of the thermoelectric module so as to ensure the improvement of the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. The cooling circle for the cold-end of the thermoelectric module which is independent of the engine cooling system is built. The nucleate boiling flow is adopted to strengthen the heat transfer from the thermoelectric module cold side to the cooling water.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Manoj K. Sampath, Figen Lacin
Abstract The Diesel engine combustion process results in harmful exhaust emissions, mainly composed of Particulate Matter (PM), Hydro Carbon (HC), Carbon monoxide (CO) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). Several technologies have been developed in the past decades to control these diesel emissions. One of the promising and well matured technology of reducing NOx is to implement Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) using ammonia (NH3) as the reducing agent. For an effective SCR system, the aqueous urea solutions should be fully decomposed into ammonia and it should be well distributed across the SCR. In the catalyst, all the ammonia is utilized for NOx reduction process. In the design stage, it is more viable to implement Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for design iterations to determine an optimized SCR system based on SCR flow distribution. And in later stage, experimental test is required to predict the after-treatment system performance based on NOx reduction. The SCR model predicts the NH3 formation from urea decomposition and it is quantified at the SCR inlet, whereas experimental data involves the NOx reduction process.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Lei Jin, Gangfeng Tan, Xuexun Guo, Rui Nie, Jing Cai, Xiaomeng Shen
Abstract In the Rankine cycle, the pressure differential generated by the phase change of the working fluid produces turbine output power, which enables the recovery of waste heat from the internal combustion engine. The heat transfer ability of the evaporator is the key factor that determines the quality of turbine's mechanical work. In this paper, the performance of the evaporator with two-phase zone and preheated zone is studied. After obtaining the thermal characteristics of diesel engine exhaust from the experimental data, the mathematical model of the evaporator is built according to the specific working conditions of ORC and geometrical parameters of the evaporator. Three typical engine operating conditions are used to estimate the heat transfer characteristics of the evaporator. The result shows that, in the evaporator, the heat transfer coefficient of the Rankine working fluid is much greater than the exhaust side of the engine. The heat transfer rate of preheated zone is larger than the two-phase zone, which is almost 67% of the overall heat transfer rate.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Sivanandi Rajadurai, Prakash Krishnan, Naveen Sridharan, Manimaran Sethuramasubramaniyam
Abstract The trend lately has shifted towards usage of thin wall and ultra-thin wall substrates. This change has come to existence due to the increased acting surface area available in these substrates. However these types of substrates have reduced isostatic strength comparatively, reducing its canning durability. This phenomenon has induced a new canning methodology which shall not disturb the substrate integrity during canning and also perform effectively to the requirements. This can be achieved by controlled canning which includes a huge investment and so a new methodology has been devised using the available resources and a partial controlled canning process is established and verified for canning performance and found to be effective. The paper shall include the procedural explanation and a set of results obtained by the new methodology to support its effectiveness.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Zhiguo Zhao, Guanyu Zheng, Fengshuang Wang, Suying Zhang, Jianhua Zhang
In order to satisfy China IV emissions regulations, a unique design concept was proposed with injector closely coupled with Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system outer body. The benefit of this design is significant in cost reduction and installation convenience. One paper was published to describe the vertical inlet layout [1]; this work is the second part describing applications of this concept to horizontal inlet configurations. For horizontal inlet pipe, two mixing pipe designs were proposed to avoid urea deposit and meet EU IV emission regulations. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique was used to evaluate two design concepts; experiments were performed to validate both designs. CFD computations and experiments give the same direction on ranking of the two decomposition tubes. With the straight decomposition pipe design and unique perforated baffle design, no urea deposits were found; in addition, the emission level satisfied EU IV regulations. Modeling of acoustic insertion loss with GT-Power was implemented and correlated with the tests, the resulting system insertion loss is higher than 20 dB under the rated engine load condition, meeting the acoustic performance targets.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Alexander Sappok, Leslie Bromberg
Abstract Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) are a key component in many on- and off-road aftertreatment systems to meet increasingly stringent particle emissions limits. Efficient thermal management and regeneration control is critical for reliable and cost-effective operation of the combined engine and aftertreatment system. Conventional DPF control systems predominantly rely on a combination of filter pressure drop measurements and predictive models to indirectly estimate the soot loading state of the filter. Over time, the build-up of incombustible ash, primarily derived from metal-containing lubricant additives, accumulates in the filter to levels far exceeding the DPF's soot storage limit. The combined effects of soot and ash build-up dynamically impact the filter's pressure drop response, service life, and fuel consumption, and must be accurately accounted for in order to optimize engine and aftertreatment system performance. This work applied a radio frequency (RF) sensor to directly monitor diesel particulate filter soot and ash levels, thereby enabling direct feedback control of the filter based on its actual loading state.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Harry Dwyer, Seungju Yoon, David Quiros, Mark Burnitzki, Roelof Riemersma, Donald Chernich, John Collins, Jorn Herner
Abstract A novel ambient dilution tunnel has been designed, tested and employed to measure the emissions from active parked regenerations of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) for 2007 and 2010 certified heavy duty diesel trucks (HDDTs). The 2007 certified engine had greater regulated emissions than the 2010 certified engine. For a fully loaded 2007 DPF there was an initial period of very large mass emissions, which was then followed by very large number of small particle emissions. The Particle Size Distribution, PSD, was distributed over a large range from 10 nm to 10 μm. The parked regenerations of the 2010 DPF had a much lower initial emission pattern, but the second phase of large numbers of small particles was very similar to the 2007 DPF. The emission results during regeneration have been compared to total emissions from recent engine dynamometer testing of 2007 and 2010 DPFs, and they are much larger. Due to the very wide spectrum in the PSD a wide variety of instrumentation was used, which included the following: (1) Engine On-board diagnostics; (2) Exhaust flow PEMS; (3) Tunnel temperature, CO2, mixture dilution ratio, and relative humidity; (4) Real-time PM instrumentation: EEPS, SMPS, DustTrak, and Dekati Mass Monitor; and (5) Gravimetric filter media.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Sivanandi Rajadurai, Guru Prasad Mani, Sundaravadivelu Mohan, Kavin Raja
Abstract Simulation's drive towards reality boundary conditions is the toughest challenge. Experience has shown that often the most significant source of error in thermal and dynamic analyses is associated within specified boundary conditions. Typically, validating the system by considering both thermal and dynamic loads with predefined assumptions is time consuming and inconclusive when confronted with reality boundary conditions. Thus, the solution comes in unique way of combining thermal and dynamic loads with specified boundary conditions and will convey computational results closer to the real scenario. As a consequence, strain concentrated regions due to thermal expansion are aggregated more, when coupled with dynamic loading. The stress generated by the coupled analyses will prove to be critical in concerning the durability issue of the hot end system. These conditions are evaluated by a finite element model through linear and non-linear approaches and results summarized.
Technical Paper
2014-09-30
Guanyu Zheng, Fengshuang Wang, Sheng Wang, Wei Gao, Zhiguo Zhao, Jian Liu, Lin Wang, Lin Wu, Hongyu Wang
The introduction of stringent EPA 2015 regulations for locomotive / marine engines and IMO 2016 Tier III marine engines initiates the need to develop large diesel engine aftertreatment systems to drastically reduce emissions such as SOx, PM, NOx, unburned HC and CO. In essence, the aftertreatment systems must satisfy a comprehensive set of performance criteria with respect to back pressure, emission reduction efficiency, mixing, urea deposits, packaging, durability, cost and others. For on-road and off-road vehicles, urea-based SCR has been the mainstream technology to reduce NOx emissions. For category II marine engines with single cylinder displacement volumes between 7 liters and 30 liters, IMO III (Tier IV) emission regulations dictate approximately 80% reduction of NOx emissions vs. Tier II emission regulations [1]. Urea / ammonia SCR is being considered as an enabling technology to achieve IMO III regulations without significant impacts on engine performance and fuel economy. As always, engine OEMs attempt to develop technologies mostly via engine measures such as EGR and high pressure common rail, in effect minimizing the content of aftertreatment systems.
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