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2015-09-28 ...
  • September 28, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
The improved efficiencies of the modern diesel engine have led to its increased use within the mobility industry. The vast majority of these diesel engines employ a high-pressure common rail fuel injection system to increase the engine's fuel-saving potential, emissions reduction, and overall performance. This one-day seminar will begin with a review of the basic principles of diesel engines and fuel injection systems. Diesel and alternative fuels will be discussed, followed by current and emerging diesel engine applications.
2015-06-16 ...
  • June 16-17, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Charlotte, North Carolina
  • August 24-25, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
  • December 8-9, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Norwalk, California
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
As diesel engines become more popular, a fundamental knowledge of diesel technology is critical for anyone involved in the diesel engine support industry. This course will explain the fundamental technology of diesel engines starting with a short but thorough introduction of the diesel combustion cycle, and continue with aspects of engine design, emission control design, and more. An overview of developing technologies for the future with a comprehensive section on exhaust aftertreatment is also included. The text, Diesel Emissions and Their Control, authored by Magdi Khair and W. Addy Majewski is included with the seminar.
2015-06-15 ...
  • June 15-17, 2015 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) - Troy, Michigan
Training / Education Classroom Seminars
Liquid fuel atomization and spray formation is the heart of the majority of stationary and mobile power generation machines that we rely on. This seminar focuses on the process of liquid atomization and spray formation and how it relates to fuel injection systems and emission of pollutants in modern engines. The seminar begins with background coverage of terminology, the purposes of liquid atomization and spray formation, and different designs of atomizers and nozzles employed in various industries.
2015-04-23
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2015-04-23
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2015-04-22
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2015-04-22
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2015-04-21
Event
Papers focusing on fuel and fuel additive effects on classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both experimental and simulation results focused on oxygenated or bio-derived fuels, alternative petroleum formulations, fuel blends, or any other fuel-related factors affecting engine performance and emissions.
2015-04-21
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2015-04-21
Event
Focuses on SI combustion technologies that employ direct, in-cylinder fuel injection. Topics of particular interest include in-cylinder fuel injection and spray studies, flow/spray interaction and in-cylinder mixture formation studies, and combustion chamber shape optimization. Focus includes "stratified" operation or other modes enabled by DI hardware, DI-specific emissions issues such as particulates and smoke, and technologies enabled by DISI (such as downsizing).
2015-04-21
Event
This session is devoted to experimental and computational work in the area of fuel injection systems and sprays. Topics include: spray characterization, cavitation, multi-phase jet modeling, CFD models for spray processes, wall films and impingement, hydraulic circuit analysis, and dissolved gas effects. Studies of both gasoline and diesel fuel sprays and fuel injection equipment are encouraged.
2015-04-21
Event
Papers focusing on fuel and fuel additive effects on classical diesel engine combustion with relatively short ignition delay, including papers dealing with low CR and high EGR calibrations. Subject matter may include both experimental and simulation results focused on oxygenated or bio-derived fuels, alternative petroleum formulations, fuel blends, or any other fuel-related factors affecting engine performance and emissions.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1264
Junseok Chang, Yoann Viollet, Abdullah Alzubail, Amir Faizal Naidu Abdul-Manan, Abdullah Al Arfaj
Abstract This paper explores the potential for reducing transport-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by introducing high-efficiency spark-ignition engines with a dual-fuel injection system to customize the octane of the fuels based on real-time engine requirements. It is assumed that a vehicle was equipped with two fuel tanks and two injection systems; one port fuel injection and one direct injection line separately. Each tank carried low octane and high octane fuel so that real-time octane blending was occurred in the combustion chamber when needed (Octane On-Demand: OOD). A refinery naphtha was selected for low octane fuel (RON=61), because of its similarity to gasoline properties but a less processed, easier to produce without changing a refinery configuration. Three oxygenates were used for high octane knock-resistant fuels in a direct injection line: methanol, MTBE, and ETBE.
2015-04-14
Journal Article
2015-01-1727
Francesco Balduzzi, Giovanni Vichi, Luca Romani, Giovanni Ferrara, Paolo Trassi, Jacopo Fiaschi, Federico Tozzi
Abstract High specific fuel consumption and pollutant emissions are the main drawbacks of the small crankcase-scavenged two-stroke engine. The symmetrical port timing combined with a carburetor or an indirect injection system leads to a lower scavenging efficiency than a four-stroke engine and to the short-circuit of fresh air-fuel mixture. The use of fuel supply systems as the indirect injection and the carburetor is the standard solution for small two-stroke engine equipment, due to the necessity of reducing the complexity, weight, overall dimensions and costs. This paper presents the results of a detailed study on the application of an innovative Low Pressure Direct Injection system (LPDI) on an existing 300 cm3 cylinder formerly equipped with a carburetor. The proposed solution is characterized by two injectors working at 5 bar of injection pressure.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1730
Luca Romani, Giovanni Vichi, Giovanni Ferrara, Francesco Balduzzi, Paolo Trassi, Jacopo Fiaschi, Federico Tozzi
Abstract High specific fuel consumption and pollutant emissions are the main drawbacks of the small crankcase-scavenged two-stroke engine. The symmetrical port timing combined with a carburetor or an indirect injection system leads to a lower scavenging efficiency than a four-stroke engine and to the short-circuit of fresh air-fuel mixture. The use of fuel supply systems as the indirect injection and the carburetor is the standard solution for small two-stroke engine equipment, due to the necessity of reducing the complexity, weight, overall dimensions and costs. This paper presents the results of a detailed study on the application of an innovative Low Pressure Direct Injection system (LPDI) on an existing 300 cm3 cylinder formerly equipped with a carburetor. The proposed solution is characterized by two injectors working at 5 bar of injection pressure.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1731
Yanxiang Yang, Bingqian Tan, Changwen Liu, Ping Zhang, Daguang Xi
A pump-end control technology for pump-nozzle fuel supply unit, in which the pump is driven and controlled electrically for pressurizing and metering the fuel fed into an engine, is studied. The unit is composed of a solenoid driven plunger pump, a high-pressure fuel tube, and an auto-open nozzle, and only the pump is propelled by PWM power from an ECU. To achieve a higher metering accuracy, a metering theory deciding the fuel discharging rate was developed by studying the system using a physical-mathematical model. The developed so called T3 theory makes the fuel supply unit with excellent metering consistency under various conditions, which can meet the requirement of fuel supply unit application to small engine management system. The study reveals that an electrically characterized variable, T3, which is associated with the net output energy, can directly results in a mass discharge.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-1647
Matthieu Lecompte, Stephane Raux, Jerome Cherel, Vivien Delpech
Abstract Euro VI standards for heavy duty vehicles require the use of a DPF in order to comply with the particulate matter emission limit. Although passive regeneration of soot by NO2, promoted by a DOC located upstream the DPF, is preferred, the use of an active regeneration might be required whenever the soot mass trapped in the DPF increases. Some manufacturers made the choice of having a fuel injection in the exhaust system in order to generate an exothermic reaction in the DOC that helps to regenerate the particulate filter. This dedicated circuit avoids the use of in-cylinder post-injection which may induce oil dilution by diesel. The DPF regeneration is efficient and the DOC works durably if the exhaust diesel spray is completely vaporized before entering the DOC and is thoroughly mixed with the exhaust gases. However, ensuring complete evaporation and an optimum mixture distribution in the exhaust line is challenging.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0949
Mathis Bode, Tobias Falkenstein, Vincent Le Chenadec, Seongwon Kang, Heinz Pitsch, Toshiyuki Arima, Hiroyoshi Taniguchi
Abstract Compared to conventional injection techniques, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) has a lot of advantages such as increased fuel efficiency, high power output and low emission levels, which can be more accurately controlled. Therefore, this technique is an important topic of today's injection system research. Although the operating conditions of GDI injectors are simpler from a numerical point of view because of smaller Reynolds and Weber numbers compared to Diesel injection systems, accurate simulations of the breakup in the vicinity of the nozzle are very challenging. Combined with the complications of experimental techniques that could be applied inside the nozzle and at the nozzle exit, this is the reason for the lack of understanding the primary breakup behavior of current GDI injectors.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0946
Yongjin Jung, Julien Manin, Scott Skeen, Lyle M Pickett
Abstract The mixing field of sprays injected into high temperature and pressure environments has been observed to be tightly connected to spreading angle, therefore linking vaporization and combustion processes to the angular dispersion of the spray. Visualization of the Engine Combustion Network three-hole, Spray B diesel injector shows substantial variation in near-field spreading angle with respect to time compared to past measurements of the single-hole, Spray A injector. The source of these variations originating inside the nozzle, and the implications on mixing, evaporation, and combustion of the diesel plume, need to be understood. In this study, we characterize the ECN-target plume for a Spray B injector (Serial # 211201), which already benefits from extensive and detailed internal measurements of nozzle geometry and needle movement, while comparing to the single-hole Spray A with the same type of detailed geometry and understanding.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0948
Le (Emma) Zhao, Ahmed Abdul Moiz, Jeffrey Naber, Seong-Young Lee, Sam Barros, William Atkinson
Abstract High-speed spray-to-spray liquid impingement could be an effective phenomenon for the spray propagation and droplet vaporization. To achieve higher vaporization efficiency, impingement from two-hole nozzles is analyzed in this paper. This paper focuses on investigating vaporization mechanism as a function of the impingement location and the collision breakup process provided by two-hole impinging jet nozzles. CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) is adopted to do simulation. Lagrangian model is used to predict jet-to-jet impingement and droplet breakup conditions while KH-RT breakup and O'Rourke collision models are implemented for the simulation. The paper includes three parts: First, a single spray injected into an initially quiescent constant volume chamber using the Lagrangian approach is simulated to identify the breakup region, which will be considered as a reference to study two-hole impinging jet nozzles.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0944
Maryam Moulai, Ronald Grover, Scott Parrish, David Schmidt
Abstract A computational and experimental study was performed to characterize the flow within a gasoline injector and the ensuing sprays. The computations included the effects of turbulence, cavitation, flash-boiling, compressibility, and the presence of non-condensible gases. The flow domain corresponded to the Engine Combustion Network's Spray G, an eight-hole counterbore injector operating in a variety of conditions. First, a rate tube method was used to measure the rate of injection, which was then used to define inlet boundary conditions for simulation. Correspondingly, injection under submerged conditions was simulated for direct comparison with experimental measurements of discharge coefficient. Next, the internal flow and external spray into pressurized nitrogen were simulated under the base spray G conditions. Finally, injection under flashing conditions was simulated, where the ambient pressure was below the vapor pressure of the fuel.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0942
Vikram Singh, Anshul Koli
Abstract This research presents the simulation of the jet behavior of gasoline ethanol blends in a quiescent chamber using the Lattice Boltzmann method. The fuel is taken as different mixtures of gasoline and ethanol, and the properties, such as density, viscosity and surface tension, are varied accordingly in the Lattice Boltzmann model. The variations in jet structure and instabilities are modeled according to the velocity of fuel injection, the composition of the gasoline-ethanol blend and the property of the surrounding mixture. The model implemented for the interaction of the two fluids; air and fuel, is the Shan Chen model. The accuracy of the model is confirmed using a static drop test at different curvatures for the two fluids as well as observing the evolution of merging droplets. This is the first time that the study of different fuels in done using the Shan Chen model.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0940
Yun Bai, Liyun Fan, Xiuzhen Ma, Enzhe Song, Xin Yan
Abstract Electronic in-line pump system (EIPS) is an electronic controlled fuel injection system which meets China's emission regulations. In this paper, a numerical model of EIPS was developed in AMESim for the purpose of creating a tool for simulation experiments. Experiments were conducted at the same model conditions to validate the model. The results are quite encouraging and in agreement with model predictions which imply that the model can accurately predict the dynamic injection characteristics of EIPS. The design of experiments was performed using a 2-level-5-factor face-centered central composite design (FCCD) method in order to study the interactive effect of factors on fuel injection quantity fluctuation (FIQF). The factors studied were supply fuel pressure, cam linear velocity, control valve lift, needle spring pretightening force and nozzle flow coefficient.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0950
Jonas Galle, Roel Verschaeren, Sebastian Verhelst
Abstract The need for simulation tools for the internal combustion engine is becoming more and more important due to the complex engine design and increasingly strict emission regulation. One needs accurate and fast models, but fuels consist of a complex mixture of different molecules which cannot realistically be handled in computations. Simplifications are required and are realized using fuel surrogates. The main goal of this work is to show that the choice of the surrogates is of importance if simplified models are used and that the performance strongly depends upon the sensitivity of the fuel properties that refer to the main model hypotheses. This paper starts with an overview of surrogates for diesel and bio-diesel as well as the motivation for choosing them. Next, a phenomenological model for vaporizing fuel-sprays is implemented to assess how well-known surrogates for diesel and bio-diesel affect the obtained results.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0929
Petter Dahlander, Daniele Iemmolo, Yifei Tong
Abstract Time-resolved mass injection rates of an outward opening piezo-actuated and a solenoid actuated multi-hole GDI injector were measured to investigate (1) the influence of both hardware and software settings and (2) the influence on the injection rates from a wide range of operational parameters and (3) discuss limitations and issues with this measurement technique. The varied operating parameters were fuel pressure, back-pressure, electrical pulse width, single/double injection and injection frequency. The varied hardware/software parameters were injector protrusion, upstream fuel pressure condition and the cut-off frequency of the software's low-pass filter. Signal quality was found to be dependent on both hardware and software settings, especially the cut-off frequency of the low-pass filter. Measurements with high signal quality were not possible for back-pressures lower than 0.5 MPa.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0926
Tianyun Li, Min Xu, David Hung, Shengqi Wu, Siqi Cheng
Abstract Comparing with port-fuel-injection (PFI) engine, the fuel sprays in spark-ignition direct-injection (SIDI) engines play more important roles since they significantly influence the combustion stability, engine efficiency as well as emission formations. In order to design higher efficiency and cleaner engines, further research is needed to understand and optimize the fuel spray atomization and vaporization. This paper investigates the atomization and evaporation of n-pentane, gasoline and surrogate fuels sprays under realistic SIDI engine conditions. An optical diagnostic technique combining high-speed Mie scattering and Schlieren imaging has been applied to study the characteristics of liquid and vapor phases inside a constant volume chamber under various operating conditions. The effects of ambient temperature, fuel temperature, and fuel type on spray atomization and vaporization are analyzed by quantitative comparisons of spray characteristics.
2015-04-14
Technical Paper
2015-01-0927
Luca Marchitto, Gerardo Valentino, Simona Merola, Cinzia Tornatore
Abstract The use of alcohols as alternative to gasoline for fuelling spark-ignition (SI) engines is widespread. Growing interest is paid for n-butanol because of its characteristics that are similar to gasoline. If compared with other alcohols, n-butanol has higher energy content and miscibility with gasoline, lower hygroscope and corrosive properties making it an attractive solution for gasoline replacement. Even if several studies have been conduced to characterize the n-butanol combustion within Spark Ignition engines, few data are available on atomization and spray behavior. This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to characterize the velocity vector field of two fuel-sprays injected by a 6-hole nozzle for Direct Injection Spark Ignition (DISI) engine. 2D Mie-scattering and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were carried out in an optically accessible vessel at ambient temperature and pressure.
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