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Viewing 1 to 30 of 4502
Event
2014-09-24
This session aims to bring together perspectives, highlighting past and future research efforts in the integration of more electric aircraft systems. It is intended to discuss the importance of energy optimization at the vehicle level when designing integrated aircraft systems. This vehicle level optimization is critical when defining future military and commercial more electric aircraft applications. This session intends to include both airframer and aircraft systems supplier perspectives.
Event
2014-09-24
This session aims to bring together perspectives, highlighting past and future research efforts in the integration of more electric aircraft systems. It is intended to discuss the importance of energy optimization at the vehicle level when designing integrated aircraft systems. This vehicle level optimization is critical when defining future military and commercial more electric aircraft applications. This session intends to include both airframer and aircraft systems supplier perspectives.
Event
2014-09-24
This session aims to bring together perspectives, highlighting past and future research efforts in the integration of more electric aircraft systems. It is intended to discuss the importance of energy optimization at the vehicle level when designing integrated aircraft systems. This vehicle level optimization is critical when defining future military and commercial more electric aircraft applications. This session intends to include both airframer and aircraft systems supplier perspectives.
Event
2014-09-23
This session aims to bring together perspectives, highlighting past and future research efforts in the integration of more electric aircraft systems. It is intended to discuss the importance of energy optimization at the vehicle level when designing integrated aircraft systems. This vehicle level optimization is critical when defining future military and commercial more electric aircraft applications. This session intends to include both airframer and aircraft systems supplier perspectives.
Event
2014-09-23
This session aims to bring together perspectives, highlighting past and future research efforts in the integration of more electric aircraft systems. It is intended to discuss the importance of energy optimization at the vehicle level when designing integrated aircraft systems. This vehicle level optimization is critical when defining future military and commercial more electric aircraft applications. This session intends to include both airframer and aircraft systems supplier perspectives.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Tim C. O'Connell, Kevin McCarthy, Andrew Paquette, David McCormick, Paul Pigg, Peter T. Lamm
Validation of models is a critical component of Model Based Design (MBD). Without validation, the accuracy of the models is not certain, so the decisions made with those models may not be based on the best information. The Integrated Vehicle Energy Technology (INVENT) program is planning a series of hardware experiments that will be used to validate a large set of integrated models. While the task of validating such a large number of interacting models is daunting, it provides an excellent opportunity to test the limits of MBD. Model validation can take places in many ways, from direct model parameter measurement, to inferred measurements to dynamic signal comparisons. In addition, for complex systems like the ones being tested on INVENT, validation can happen at many levels, from individual unit construction all the way to integrated testing. A process for coordinating these varied validation efforts across multiple participants is needed. For INVENT, a plan to implement all the aspects of validation listed above has been created.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Karen Davies, Patrick Norman, Catherine Jones, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
In an attempt to reduce NOx and noise emissions and improve overall fuel efficiency of future generation aircraft, Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) is being considered as a novel means of providing aircraft thrust. TeDP designs proposed to date have comprised a fully superconducting, and typically DC, network in which a number of generators provide power to multiple propulsors distributed across the aircraft via a complex arrangement of parallel redundant busbars and feeders. As such, the electrical network is critical to the safety of the aircraft and in order to attain the required levels of reliability, effective protection systems, tuned specifically to the superconducting parameters of the network, must be devised. Under normal operating conditions, superconducting materials have zero resistance, and superconducting cables have a lower mutual inductance than that of conventional cables. Compared with conventional networks, these parameters introduce less damping, leading to higher prospective fault currents and faster rates of fault development.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Christine Ross, Michael Armstrong, Mark Blackwelder, Catherine Jones, Patrick Norman, Steven Fletcher
The NASA N3-X blended-wing body with turboelectric distributed propulsion (TeDP) concept is being studied to achieve N3-X goals such as reduced noise, NOx emissions, and improved energy efficiency. The gas turbine engines are used to provide rotational energy to generators which convert this energy to electrical. The electrical power output of the generators is rectified and distributed as a DC system to an array of propulsor motors each with their own inverter. The electrical distribution system is superconducting in order to maximize its efficiency and increase the power density of all associated components. An aspect of this concept currently under study is the protection of the electrical distribution system for propulsion. The protection of a superconducting DC network poses unique electrical and thermal challenges due to low impedance of the superconductor and operation in the superconducting or quenched states. For a fixed TeDP electrical system architecture with fixed power ratings, several protection strategies are investigated.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Hidefumi Saito, Shoji Uryu, Norio Takahashi, Noriko Morioka, Hitoshi Oyori
In this study, we seek solution to energy optimization issue of Environmental Control System (ECS) for electric aircraft. Aircraft ECS must have three functions as pressurization, ventilation, and temperature control. Non-bleed ECS based on more electric aircraft makes it possible to distribute the three functions to equipment. Motor Driven Fresh Air Compressor (MDFAC) mainly takes charge of pressurization function and ventilation function, therefore selection of equipment for temperature control function is important. We select not Air Cycle System (ACS) but Vapor Cycle System (VCS) as the equipment for temperature control function, for minimization of energy consumption by higher Coefficient of Performance (COP). We try to clarify specifications, configuration and weight of the VCS suitable for the temperature control function of single aisle aircraft, which is a non-bleed type aircraft equipped with MDFACs. To keep increase of flight fuel consumption by additional weight negligible, weight and rated performance of the VCS are set as the same as those of the ACS.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Javier A. Parrilla
Current industry trends demonstrate aircraft electrification will be part of future platforms in order to achieve higher levels of efficiency in various vehicle level sub-systems. However, electrification requires a substantial change in aircraft design that is not suitable for re-winged or re-engined applications as some aircraft manufacturers are opting for today. Thermal limits arise as engine cores progressively get smaller and hotter to improve overall engine efficiency, while legacy systems still demand a substantial amount of pneumatic, hydraulic and electric power extraction. The environmental control system (ECS) provides pressurization, ventilation and air conditioning in commercial aircraft, making it the main heat sink for all aircraft loads with exception of the engine. To mitigate the architecture thermal limits in an efficient manner, the form in which the ECS interacts with the engine will have to be enhanced as to reduce the overall energy consumed and achieve an energy optimized solution.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Riko Bornholdt, Frank Thielecke
The current delay of the successors for the present civil short- and long-range aircraft models leads to the focus on retrofit strategies on the one hand. On the other hand due to the additional time frame for the development of the projected successors new degrees of freedom can be exploited. In both cases new potential can be gained by challenging the existing requirements, which restrict aircraft system innovations. Reconsidering the functions and their allocation to specific systems could lead to beneficial architecture concepts. Furthermore analyzing the independencies between the systems and dissolving the system specific development paradigm could allow the exploitation of synergies and expose room of improvement. The described shift in the design approach leads to the need for new methodologies for integrated system architecture design, which consider the changed constraints and capitalize the gained potentials. The paper and the corresponding presentation will cover a methodology guiding the engineer through the successive process of aircraft system architecture design.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Jennifer C. Shaw, Patrick Norman, Stuart Galloway, Graeme Burt
In order for the Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) N+3 initiative goals to be realised, aircraft subsystems and airframes need to be optimised for both energy efficiency and operational effectiveness. Concepts and designs proposed to achieve these goals are expected to lead to a significant departure from the modern day state of the art in electrical system architectures, most notably with the inclusion of electrically driven propulsors. Such Turboelectric Distributed Propulsion (TeDP) systems place a much greater emphasis on the electrical system for safe and efficient flight. A key distinguishing factor between current more-electric and TeDP network architecture designs is the power level at which critical loads must be supplied, specifically the supply to high power propulsion motors in TeDP systems must provide a similar level of reliability to that of traditional low power critical loads (such as avionics) in present day aircraft. Necessary to achieving supply targets for current systems is the use of battery backup; however, the provision of sustained operability through additional supply for high power loads, either through dedicated generators or bulk energy storage, is inefficient in terms of weight.
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Tim C. O'Connell, Kevin McCarthy, Andrew Paquette, David McCormick, Paul Pigg, Peter T. Lamm
ABSTRACT
Technical Paper
2014-09-16
Teresa Donateo, Maria Grazia De Giorgi, Antonio Ficarella, Elisabetta Argentieri, Elena Rizzo
The aim of the present investigation is the implementation of a Matlab/Simulink environment to assess the performance (thrust, specific fuel consumption, aircraft/engine mass, cost, etc.) and environmental impact (greenhouse and pollutant emissions) of conventional and more electric aircrafts. In particular, the benefits of adopting more electric solutions for either aircrafts at given missions specifications can be evaluated. Each component is modeled as a black box that receives input (in terms of mass flow and energy) from the previous component and send its output variables to the next one after a balance of mass and energy content. The software includes a design workflow for the input of the aircraft specification, the choice of the architecture (e.g. series or parallel) and the specification of each component including energy converter (piston engine, turboprop, turbojet, fuel cell, etc.), energy storage systems (batteries, supercapacitors), auxiliaries and secondary power systems.
Standard
2014-08-12
The specifications contained in this SAE Standard pertain to high tension ignition cable used in road vehicle engine ignition systems.
Standard
2014-08-11
This SAE Standard specifies the general requirements and test methods for nonshielded high-tension ignition cable assemblies.
Standard
2014-07-09
This SAE Standard establishes performance criteria for towed, semi-mounted, or mounted and arm type rotary mowers with one or more blade assemblies of 77.5 cm blade tip circle diameter or over, mounted on a propelling tractor or machine of at least 15 kW, intended for marketing as industrial mowing equipment and designed for cutting grass and other growth in public use areas such as parks, cemeteries, and along roadways and highways. The use of the word “industrial” is not to be confused with “in-plant industrial equipment.” This document does not apply to: a. Turf care equipment primarily designed for personal use, consumption, or enjoyment of a consumer in or around a permanent or temporary household or residence. b. Equipment designed primarily for agricultural purposes but which may be used for industrial use. c. Self-powered or self-propelled mowers or mowing machines.
WIP Standard
2014-06-24
This document discusses, in broad general terms, typical present instrumentation practice for post-overhaul gas turbine engine testing. Production engine testing and engine development work are outside the scope of this document as they will typically use many more channels of instrumentation, and in most cases will have requirements for measurements that are never made in post-overhaul testing, such as fan airflow measurements, or strain measurements on compressor blades. The specifications for each parameter to be measured, in terms of measurement range and measurement accuracy, are established by the engine manufacturers. Each test cell instrument system should meet or exceed those requirements. Furthermore, each instrument system should be recalibrated regularly, to ensure that it is still performing correctly.
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