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Viewing 1 to 30 of 3467
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0042
Ali Jannoun, Xavier Tauzia, Pascal Chesse, Alain Maiboom
Residual gas plays a crucial role in the combustion process of spark ignited engines. It acts as a diluent and has a huge impact on pollutant emissions (NOx and CO emissions), engine efficiency and tendency to knock. Therefore, characterizing the residual gas fraction is an essential task for engine modelling and calibration purposes. Thus, an in-cylinder sampling technique was developed on a spark ignited VVT engine to measure residual gas fraction during the compression phase. Two gas sampling valves were flush mounted to the combustion chamber walls; they are located between the intake valves and between intake and exhaust valves respectively. Sampled gas was stocked in a sampling bag using a vacuum pump and measured with a standard gas analyzer. This paper describes in details the sampling technique and proposes a methodology allowing the evaluation of the residual gas fraction. For this purpose, five kinds of tests were undertaken.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0140
Roberto Aliandro Varella, Gonçalo Duarte, Patricia Baptista, Pablo Mendoza Villafuerte, Luis Sousa
Due to the need to properly quantify vehicle emissions in real world operation, Real Driving Emissions (RDE) test procedures will be used for measuring gaseous emissions on new EURO 6 vehicles.at the RDE 1 & 2: Commission Regulation (EU) 2016/427 of 10 March 2016 amending Regulation (EC) No 692/2008 as regards emissions from light passenger and commercial vehicles. Updated regulations have been enhanced to define RDE tests boundaries and data analysis procedures, in order to provide an accurate way to obtain representative results. The boundary conditions defined for vehicle testing include external atmospheric temperature, which can range from 0ºC to around 30ºC, for moderate conditions and -7oC up to 35oC for extended conditions in RDE tests. As a result of this range of possible test ambient temperature, pollutant emissions and energy consumption can vary considerably.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0138
Giovanni Meccariello, Livia Della Ragione
In the context of a transport sustainability, some solutions could be proposed from the integration of many disciplines, architects, environmentalists, policy makers, and consequently it may be addressed with different approaches. These solutions would be apply at different geographical levels, i.e. national, regional or urban scale. Moreover, the assessment of cars emissions in real use plays a fundamental role for their reductions. This is also the direction of the new harmonized test procedures (WLTP). Furthermore, it is fundamental to keep in mind that the new WLTC cycle will reproduce a situation closer to the reality respect to the EUDC/NEDC driving cycle. In this paper, we will be focused on vehicle kinematic evaluation aimed at valuation of traffic situation and emissions.
2017-09-04
Technical Paper
2017-24-0129
Vladimir Merzlikin, Svetlana Parshina, Victoria Garnova, Andrey Bystrov, Alexander Makarov, Sergey Khudyakov
The core of this paper is reduction of exhaust emission and increase of diesel efficiency due to application of microstructure ceramic semitransparent heat-insulating coatings (SHIC). The authors conducted experimental study of thermal state of internal-combustion engine piston head with a heat-insulating layer formed by plasma coating method. The paper presents physical and mathematical simulation of improved optical (transmittance, reflectance, absorption, scattering) and thermo radiative (emittance) characteristics determining optimal temperature profiles inside SHIC. The paper considers the effect of subsurface volumetric heating up and analyzes temperature maximum position inside subsurface of this coating. Decrease of SHIC surface temperature of the coated piston in comparison with temperature of traditional opaque heat-insulating coatings causes NOx emission reduction.
CURRENT
2017-06-16
Standard
AMS2380G
This specification covers the procedures for approval of products of premium-quality titanium alloys and the controls to be exercised in producing such products.
CURRENT
2017-06-16
Standard
ARP584D
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) addresses the design, installation, and testing of coiled tube assemblies ranging from 1/4 inch (6.3 mm) to 1.0 inch (25 mm) diameter using CRES tubing per AMS-T-6845, unless otherwise approved by the Procuring Activity. This ARP specifically details three different configurations of coiled tubing. These configurations should be compatible with pressure levels up to 3000 psi (20.7 MPa) upon the completion of the analysis for the actual stress and life requirement of the intended application. However, formal qualification tests are recommended to verify the satisfactory installation, clamping, and the life of each unique design. NOTE: Refer to ARP4146 for information on design of coiled tube assemblies using Titanium tubing.
2017-06-16
WIP Standard
J1113/11
This SAE Standard defines methods and apparatus to evaluate electronic devices for immunity to potential interference from conducted transients along battery feed or switched ignition inputs. Test apparatus specifications outlined in this procedure were developed for components installed in vehicles with 12-V systems (passenger cars and light trucks, 12-V heavy-duty trucks, and vehicles with 24-V systems). Presently, it is not intended for use on other input/output (I/O) lines of the device under test (DUT).
2017-06-13
WIP Standard
J2932
This document provides test performance requirements for air disc brake actuators for service and combination service parking brake actuators with respect to function, durability and environmental performance when tested according to SAE J2902.
CURRENT
2017-06-12
Standard
AS7003E
This document has been declared "CANCELLED" as of June 2017 and has been superseded by PRI PD1100. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Aerospace Standards Index noting that it is superseded by PRI PD1100. Cancelled specifications are available from SAE.
2017-06-12
WIP Standard
AS6171A

This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) standardizes inspection and test procedures, workmanship criteria, and minimum training and certification requirements to detect Suspect/Counterfeit (SC) Electrical, Electronic, and Electromechanical (EEE) parts. The requirements of this document apply once a decision is made to use parts with unknown chain of custody that do not have pedigree back to the original component manufacturer, or have been acquired from a broker or independent distributor, or when there are other known risk elements that result in the User/Requester to have concerns about potential SC EEE parts. The tests specified by this standard may also detect occurrences of malicious tampering, although the current version of this standard is not designed specifically for this purpose.

CURRENT
2017-06-08
Standard
AS7109/7B
This document has been declared "CANCELLED" as of June 2017 and has been superseded by PRI AC7109/7. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Aerospace Standards Index noting that it is superseded by PRI AC7109/7. Cancelled specifications are available from SAE.
CURRENT
2017-06-08
Standard
AS7109/6B
This document has been declared "CANCELLED" as of June 2017 and has been superseded by PRI AC7109/6. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Aerospace Standards Index noting that it is superseded by PRI AC7109/6. Cancelled specifications are available from SAE.
CURRENT
2017-06-07
Standard
AS7109/5B
This document has been declared "CANCELLED" as of June 2017 and has been superseded by PRI AC7109/5. By this action, this document will remain listed in the Numerical Section of the Aerospace Standards Index noting that it is superseded by PRI AC7109/5. Cancelled specifications are available from SAE.
CURRENT
2017-06-07
Standard
J820_201706
This document applies primarily to mobile cranes that lift loads by means of a drum and hoist line mechanism. It can be used to determine the hoist line speed and power of other hoist line mechanisms, if the load can be held constant and hoist line travel distance is sufficient for the accuracy of the line speed measurements prescribed. This recommended practice applies to all mechanical, hydraulic, and electric powered hoist mechanisms.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1803
John Van Baren
Abstract The accumulated damage that a product experiences in the field due to the variety of vibration stresses placed upon it will eventually cause failures in the product. The failure modes resulting from these dynamic stresses can be replicated in the laboratory and correlated to end use environment to validate target reliability requirements. This presentation addresses three fundamental questions about developing accelerated random vibration stress tests.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1800
Robert White
Abstract Several analytical tools exist for estimating a driveshaft’s critical speed, from simple elementary beam theory to sophisticated FEA models. Ultimately, nothing is better than a test, because no one will argue with the outcome from a well-designed measurement. Impact response measurements are easy, but they tend to over predict the critical speed. A test which sweeps the shaft speed up until failure is telling, but the speed causing failure is strongly dependent on even small amounts of variation in rotor unbalance. Waterfall plots of shaft displacement measurements offer the best indication of critical speed, however sometimes the resonance isn’t unmistakable or multiple resonances exist, making the critical speed unclear. A method less susceptible to system variation is offered here, fitting shaft orbit measurements to the theoretical single degree of freedom equation.
2017-06-05
Journal Article
2017-01-1774
Fabio Luis Marques dos Santos, Tristan Enault, Jan Deleener, Tom Van Houcke
Abstract The increasing pressure on fuel economy has brought car manufacturers to implement solutions that improve vehicle efficiency, such as downsized engines, cylinder deactivation and advanced torque lock-up strategies. However, these solutions have a major drawback in terms of noise and vibration comfort. Downsized engines and lock-up strategies lead to the use of the engine at lower RPMs, and the reduced number of cylinders generates higher torque irregularities. Since the torque generated by the engine is transferred through flexible elements (clutch, torsional damper, gearbox, transmission, tire), these also impact the energy that is transferred to the vehicle body and perceived by the driver. This phenomenon leads to low frequency behavior, for instance booming noise and vibration. This paper presents a combined test and CAE modelling approach (1D/3D) to reverse engineer a vehicle equipped with a CPVA (centrifugal pendulum vibration absorber).
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1886
Siwen Zhang, Jian Pang, Jun Zhang, Zhuangzhuang Ma, Xiaoxuan Zhang, Congguang Liu, Lihui Deng
Abstract A subjective evaluation method for the air-borne sound insulation of vehicle body in reverberation room is developed and the correlation between the subjective preference and objective noise reduction level (NRL) is investigated in this paper. The stationary vehicle's interior noise is recorded by using a digital artificial head under a given white noise excitation in the reverberation room, which demonstrates more credible than those in traditional road test methods. The recorded noises of six different vehicles are replayed and evaluated subjectively by 22 appraisers in a sound quality room. The paired comparison scoring method is employed and the check and statistic methods for the subjective scores are introduced. The subjective preference is introduced and calculated by the statistics and normalization of the effective scores, which can indicate an overall preference ranking of all the six vehicles numerically.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1908
Rong Guo, Jun Gao, Xiao-kang Wei, Zhao-ming Wu, Shao-kang Zhang
Abstract The statement of the engine shake problem is presented through comparing the quarter vehicle models with the rigid-connected and flexible-connected powertrain which is supported on the body by a rubber mount. Then the model is extended by replacing the rubber mount as a hydraulic engine mount (HEM) with regard to the inertia and resistance of the fluid within the inertia track. Based on these, a full vehicle model with 14 degree of freedoms (DOFs) is proposed to calculate the engine shake, which consists of 6 of the powertrain, 1 of the fluid within the inertia track of the HEM, 3 of the car body and 4 of the unsprung mass. Simulation analysis based on the proposed model is implemented, through which the conclusion is drawn that the HEM has great influence on the body and seat track response subjected to front wheel inputs, compared with the rubber mount.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1863
Bhaskar Avutapalli, Mayuresh Pathak, Shalini Solipuram, Ken Buczek, Aaron Lock
Abstract Road noise and speech intelligibility are becoming ever more important, irrespective of the vehicle size, due to vehicle refinement as well as connectivity with mobile communication equipment. With better aerodynamic designs, development of refined powertrains, and a tectonic shift from I.C. engine to electric motors, road noise and wind noise will become more apparent to the customer and hence will become a priority for automakers to refine their vehicles. This paper describes the efforts undertaken to identify the road noise paths and develop countermeasures for a compact SUV vehicle. A hybrid test/CAE approach was followed to improve road noise performance of this vehicle. This effort involved developing tire CAE models from physical hardware and creating synthesized road-load input from data taken on roads.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1851
Taewook Yoo, Ronald W. Gerdes, Seungkyu Lee, Daniel Stanley, Thomas Herdtle, Georg Eichhorn
Abstract Several methods for evaluating damping material performance are commonly used, such as Oberst beam test, power injection method and the long bar test. Among these test methods, the Oberst beam test method has been widely used in the automotive industry and elsewhere as a standard method, allowing for slight bar dimension differences. However, questions have arisen as to whether Oberst test results reflect real applications. Therefore, the long bar test method has been introduced and used in the aerospace industry for some time. In addition to the larger size bar in the long bar test, there are a few differences between Oberst (cantilever) and long bar test (center-driven) methods. In this paper, the differences between Oberst and long bar test methods were explored both experimentally and numerically using finite element analysis plus an analytical method. Furthermore, guidelines for a long bar test method are provided.
2017-06-05
Technical Paper
2017-01-1881
Charles Moritz, Satyajeet Deshpande
Abstract As part of the update process to SAE J1637, Laboratory Measurement of the Composite Vibration Damping Properties of Materials on a Supporting Steel Bar, the Acoustical Materials Committee commissioned a round robin study to determine the current laboratory-to-laboratory variation, and to better understand best practices for composite loss factor measurements. Guidance within the current standard from a previous round robin study indicates a coefficient of variation of 35% for laboratory-to-laboratory measurements. It was hoped that current instrumentation and test practices would yield lower variability. Over the course of 2 years, 8 laboratories tested 4 bars, three damped steel bars and one bare steel bar. These bars were tested at -20°C, -5°C, 10°C, 25°C, 40°C, and 55°C. The damping materials were intentionally selected to provide low damping, moderate damping, and high damping as difficulties in determining the composite loss increase with increased damping.
CURRENT
2017-06-05
Standard
AS5620B
This SAE Aerospace Standard (AS) shall be used in conjunction with AMS 4946 to provide requirements for qualification testing and for Qualified Products Listing (QPL) and Qualified Manufacturer Listing (QML) for Ti-3Al-2.5V cold worked and stress relieved hydraulic system tubing. The basic tubing shall comply with the requirements of AMS 4946.
CURRENT
2017-06-01
Standard
J1390_201706
Three levels of fan structural analysis are included in this practice: a. Initial Structural Integrity b. In-vehicle Testing c. Durability (Laboratory) Test Methods The Initial Structural Integrity section describes analytical and test methods used to predict potential resonance and, therefore, possible fatigue accumulation. The In-vehicle (or machine) section enumerates the general procedure used to conduct a fan strain gage test. Various considerations that may affect the outcome of strain gage data have been described for the user of this procedure to adapt/discard depending on the particular application. The Durability Test Methods section describes the detailed test procedures for a laboratory environment that may be used depending on type of fan, equipment availability, and end objective. The second and third levels build upon information derived from the previous level.
2017-05-29
WIP Standard
J2704
This SAE Recommended Practice describes a test method for determining the vertical force and deflection properties of a non-rolling tire and the associated contact patch length and width. The method applies to any tire so long as the equipment is properly scaled to conduct the measurements for the intended test tire. The data are suitable for use in determining parameters for road load models and for comparative evaluations of the measured properties in research and development. NOTE-Herein, road load models are models for predicting forces applied to the vehicle spindles during operation over irregular pavements. Within the context of this Recommended Practice, forces applied to the pavement are not considered.
2017-05-25
WIP Standard
J1113/27
1.1 Vehicle electrical/electronic systems may be affected when immersed in an electromagnetic field generated by sources such as radio and TV broadcast stations, radar and communication sites, mobile transmitters, cellular phones, etc. The reverberation method is used to evaluate the immunity of electronic devices in the frequency range of 500 MHz to 2.0 GHz, with possible extensions to 200 MHz and 10 GHz, depending upon chamber size and construction. Optional pulse modulation testing at HIRF (High Intensity Radiated Fields) test levels, based upon currently known environmental threats, has been added to this revision of the standard. This document addresses the Mode Stir (Continuous Stirring) Reverberation testing method which has been successfully utilized as a design and production stage development tool for many years.
2017-05-24
WIP Standard
J2087
This SAE Standard provides test procedures, requirements, and guidelines for a daytime running light (DRL) function.
CURRENT
2017-05-22
Standard
AS39029/91B
SCOPE IS UNAVAILABLE.
CURRENT
2017-05-19
Standard
AMS2355M
This specification covers quality assurance sampling and testing procedures used to determine conformance to applicable specification requirements of wrought aluminum alloy and wrought magnesium alloy mill products (except forging stock), and includes quality assurance and testing procedures for rolled, forged, and flash welded rings (see 8.3). Requirements are specified in inch/pound units.
CURRENT
2017-05-18
Standard
AIR6130A
14-day material test to determine the cyclic effects of runway deicing compounds on cadmium plated parts.
Viewing 1 to 30 of 3467

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