Europe’s blockchain-based Smart E-Mobility Challenge will conclude this May in Germany
(Image courtesy: Trusted IoT Alliance)
 

Europe’s blockchain-based Smart E-Mobility Challenge will conclude this May in Germany

The challenge creator, the Trusted IoT Alliance, aims to accelerate the developing electric vehicle and e-mobility markets.

To advance development of Internet of things (IoT) mobility solutions like cryptography, distributed ledger technology (DLT) – also known as blockchain technology, and secure enclaves, the Trusted IoT Alliance (TIoTA) has laid out the final series of events for its Smart E-Mobility Challenge. The challenge, designed to accelerate commercialization of the emerging e-mobility marketplace, will be co-produced by IoT research and benchmarking firm, MachNation.

TIoTA, an open software consortium of over 50 members organized to support the creation of a secure, scalable, interoperable, and trusted IoT ecosystem, began the E-Mobility Challenge to link IoT devices with consumers and stakeholder companies such as operators and service, communication, and payment providers within the preexisting European electric vehicle ecosystem.

 

 

The challenge kicked with the PACE Tour event, where competitors from various European cities had access to a Jaguar I-PACE sport utility vehicle (SUV) provided by Robert Bosch GmbH (Bosch). Competitors used the I-PACE, Jaguar’s first purely electric platform, to work on their challenge entries and conduct hackathons using an automotive Linux edge node (ALEN) data interchange device.

 

Read the full article in the Automated & Connected Knowledge Hub.

 

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William Kucinski is content editor at SAE International, Aerospace Products Group in Warrendale, Pa. Previously, he worked as a writer at the NASA Safety Center in Cleveland, Ohio and was responsible for writing the agency’s System Failure Case Studies. His interests include literally anything that has to do with space, past and present military aircraft, and propulsion technology.

Contact him regarding any article or collaboration ideas by e-mail at william.kucinski@sae.org.

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