Viziblezone enables vehicle-to-pedestrian collision avoidance through technology already in our cell phones
Image courtesy: Viziblezone Ltd. via YouTube
 

Viziblezone enables vehicle-to-pedestrian collision avoidance through technology already in our cell phones

According to the World Health Organization, more than 1.5 million people were killed and more than 50 million injured in road accidents in 2018. More than 50 percent of these incidents involved pedestrians and cyclists – a number that tragically continues to grow. In Israel, authorities noted that there had been 43 pedestrian fatalities in the country since the beginning of 2019 alone.

Viziblezone Ltd.’s vehicle-to-pedestrian (V2P) solution to autonomous vehicles or “self-driving cars” is now capable of detecting pedestrians at distances of up to 150 meters (nearly 500 feet) – even when those pedestrians are standing behind objects that block line-of-sight. The company’s ready to launch V2P solution uses the radio frequency (RF) emitting components of mobile phones carried by pedestrians and a counterpart device embedded in a vehicle to help determine the likelihood of a potential impact.

While many technologies to mitigate vehicle-to-vehicle accidents have been developed in recent years, Jerusalem-based Viziblezone maintains that a significant lack of vehicle-to-pedestrian accident prevention systems exist. Meanwhile, with the growth of autonomously driven vehicles, and the expansion of technologies such as robo-taxis or self-driving rideshare vehicles, the risks to pedestrians are increasing exponentially at a rate that existing vehicle sensor systems can't effectively address.

 


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William Kucinski is content editor at SAE International, Aerospace Products Group in Warrendale, Pa. Previously, he worked as a writer at the NASA Safety Center in Cleveland, Ohio and was responsible for writing the agency’s System Failure Case Studies. His interests include literally anything that has to do with space, past and present military aircraft, and propulsion technology.

Contact him regarding any article or collaboration ideas by e-mail at william.kucinski@sae.org.

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