Episode 190 - Transforming Freight With Intelligent Movement

By combining electric power, digital intelligence, and autonomous driving technology, one company is transforming the world of shipping and freight management for good.

Founded in 2016, Einride designs, develops and deploys technologies for freight mobility. The company’s offerings include an intelligent platform, Einride Saga, alongside electric and autonomous fleets, charging infrastructure, and connectivity networks.

In 2022, the company became the first to operate a fully electric autonomous heavy duty vehicle without a driver on board in an operational pilot on U.S. public road. By developing a completely bespoke autonomous truck, Einride offers customers a clean, safe, and efficient way to ship.

To learn more about the future of intelligent freight, we sat down with Tim Dawkins, Senior Safety Director, Einride, to discuss the company’s interconnected ecosystem and how it enables faster, greener, and cheaper freight.

Meet Our Guest

TIM DAWKINS
Senior Safety Director
Einride

Tim Dawkins is an automotive technologist specializing in autonomous vehicle safety with over a decade of experience in product development, safety systems, and security research. In his current role, he is responsible for the safety of Einride’s autonomous electric trucks around the world as they are deployed with customers. Additionally, in his previous role with the World Economic Forum, Tim authored a series of autonomous vehicle policy and safety frameworks that were adopted by various global regulators.

Tim has an engineering background in ADAS & AV product development with SBD Automotive. Tim holds an MBA from Surrey Business School and a BEng in Motorsport Engineering from Brunel University London. Tim also holds a UL4600 Certified Autonomy Safety Professional (CASP) accreditation from UL Solutions, certifying his competence in preparing safety cases for autonomous vehicles. In his spare time, Tim can usually be found messing around with his 1976 MG.

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Transcript:

Grayson Brulte:

Hello, I'm your host, Grayson Brulte. Welcome to another episode of SAE Tomorrow Today, a show about emerging technology and trends and mobility with the leaders and innovators who make it all happen. On today's episode, we're absolutely honored to be joined by Tim Dawkins, senior technical director. On today's episode, Tim will discuss the autonomous freight technology and Einride's role in creating a greener, more intelligent future for the trucking industry.

We hope you enjoy this episode. Tim, welcome to the podcast.

Tim Dawkins:

Hi, Grayson. It's great to be here.

Grayson Brulte:

It's great to have you here because Einride is building the future of trucking. You're focused both on autonomy and electrification, and you have the Saga platform. How are you approaching the future of trucking?

Tim Dawkins:

That's such a great question and one that we love to answer. So Einride's mission is to transform freight through intelligent movement. And in real terms, that means we enable shippers to make a cost-efficient switch to sustainable road freight using digital, electric and autonomous technologies, which helps our customers meet their sustainability and business targets.

And so our products reflect this. You mentioned Einride Saga, that's our freight operating system that we use to Digitize the freight needs of our customers and identify opportunities for electrification. We then have connected electric trucks, which are driven by humans. These are battery electric trucks that slot right into where a diesel tractor would be moving a container today.

And then of course we have our autonomous electric transport. Our AETs, our autonomous trucks, which are really our vision for where the future of freight can go. So yeah, we believe that the future of freight is electric. And we also believe in providing the right truck for our customers to meet their freight needs today.

Grayson Brulte:

Providing the right truck is really smart approach. Perhaps there's a longer journey or a shorter journey. I could see reusing your bespoke autonomous truck to say, go 15 miles from warehouse to warehouse in a controlled environment. That's a really great use case where you have another truck. It's not going to go 200, 300 miles.

In 2022, Einride developed a bespoke, completely bespoke autonomous truck. One of the first designed in the world of that design, no cab, just pure, beautiful Swedish design. Why? 

Tim Dawkins: 

So the Gen 2 AET, as you said, came out in November, 2022, and it's the latest autonomous electric. transport vehicle from Einride, the latest AET.

And we've built a series of prototypes, which if you Google Einride autonomous truck, you may see going back through the years, but the Gen2 is the one that's built for series production. It's the one that we're going to be scaling with our customers. So compared to our previous prototypes it's a bit bigger.

It's got a larger hold. It's got more capacity. It's obviously got our latest generation automated driving system. So sensors, compute, actuators, et cetera. But really overall, this is the one that's built for putting on the road with customers. So it's got, it's built for the heavy duty use.
It's got, the durability baked into it, the maintainability for long term deployment, and it's also compliant as much as possible with various market requirements for lights and reflectors and brake hoses and things like that. So this is the truck that we're taking and putting on the road with customers at scale, and we're really excited to show it off to the world and start getting some feedback from people who are using it. 

Grayson Brulte:

How are your customers planning to use the Gen 2 truck?

Tim Dawkins:

Yeah, so the Gen 2 80, as you can see, is a box truck. As you mentioned, it's really good at those repeated Logistics runs say if you're moving goods from a manufacturing plant to a finished goods warehouse, palletized goods, those kinds of repeated loads that drivers really don't want to do, especially if you get paid by the mile.

If you're only driving a couple dozen miles a day, then it's not a great payday, but that repeatability, that schedulability is a really good use case for autonomy. So that's where we are putting it at the moment. And as I said, we're doing this now with the Gen 2 in sustained long-term deployments, so multiyear deployments, which is a really great opportunity for us to get some feedback on this thing in use with our customers and iterate and continue to develop our products further.

Grayson Brulte:

Let's take a customer, for example, and they're operating a Gen 2, but they're also operating a fleet of electric vehicles. Does the Saga operating system, does that become the glue that holds their freight operations together? Where you're from manufacturing plant to assembly. Okay. You're going to run the gen two, say from assembly to customer to distribution warehouse, they'll run an electric truck. Does that all run through the Saga platform? 

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. So we want to make sure that every Einride customer is using Saga and we use Saga to identify which of their logistics flows are right for electrification. from the very beginning and which ones can support automation with the technology that we have today.

So as you said, we have various customers who are using our autonomous trucks who also use our connected electric trucks to either provide additional steps of that supply chain for them or are doing different flows which need a bit more adaptability or Some other capability that Autonomous Truck can't quite support for them today.

Grayson Brulte:

Carlsberg is using the Saga platform for their deployment of electric trucks. Why are they using it? Are they using it to monitor their carbon? Are they using it to monitor battery health, logistics? It's a big brewer. Why are they using it? 


Tim Dawkins:

So the answer is all of the above. So when a customer starts with Saga, we take whatever data they can give us about their logistics network and we will ingest that into the platform and use it to create a digital model of the goods they're moving, the flows they have, the routes they're driving, the vehicles they're using, and use that to identify where we can drop in our electric trucks and our autonomous trucks. So in the case of Carlsberg, they have very specific stated sustainability goals, and we're able to offer them a sustainable, reliable transport solution with our connected electric trucks at a competitive rate to what they were paying their previous logistics provider, whilst also showing them that they're driving towards their sustainability goals.

So for every diesel truck we're taking out of circulation, we're able to estimate a CO2 production. Equivalent emissions reduction because of the emissions that are connected electric trucks aren't creating and we can also tailor that estimate based on, where they get their electricity from how they're planning to charge a vehicle, how it's being used in real time and give them a weekly report essentially on how much energy they're saving and how much CO2 they're abating from missing in their logistics float.

Grayson Brulte:

Are you seeing that weekly report go into the annual corporate sustainability reports? Is that data going into those reports and being used for metrics such as the EU requires? 

Tim Dawkins: 

Absolutely. And we actually got a recent accreditation by one of the Swedish authorities to certify our approach to CO2 emissions reduction for our customers.

So it's actually a really powerful value add from Saga to be able to provide a credible estimate of their CO2 savings by taking diesel trucks off the road and replacing them with our vehicles. 

Grayson Brulte:

Yeah, one would imagine that would help drive sales. 

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. Some of our customers come to us exactly for that.

In fact, if you look back at the history of Einride's customers, particularly some of our earlier champions, companies like Oatly, their whole reason of being is tied to emissions reduction and sustainable living. So we love working with partners that have the same mission, the same relentless pursuit of sustainability as we do.

Grayson Brulte:

Where are you sourcing? the trucks from? Is it class six trucks, class eight trucks? Are you going down to fours? Where are you sourcing the electric trucks from? And then how are you integrating them into the Saga platform? Is it perhaps I can quite say, Hey, Tim, I want to get rid of these diesel junkers and I want to go to electric. Can you do the whole thing for me? And I just basically pay you one check or how does that work? 

Tim Dawkins:

So we buy our connected electric trucks from various OEMs around the world in the US and Europe and we're able to offer the right truck for that customers’ needs and their price point So the vast majority of our fleet are class 8 trucks But we do have a few class 6s in the mix as well. And we buy trucks from Daimler from Volvo from Scania from BYD, you name it, we've either we either operate it or we've tested it for one of our customers. So we're able to pick the right price point, the right battery range, the right load capacity and the right form factor for the goods that the customer is moving. And then again, using Saga, we will identify how that vehicle needs to be operationalized, how many trucks they need to meet their requirements, and also to provide the charging infrastructure to support that and plan a whole shift around it.

So it really is a whole turnkey operation, and we offer a full white glove service, including maintenance and any repairs, so that if they get a flat tire or a driver knocks off a mirror or something, we'll just swap that truck out. swap that truck out, get it taken care of and get them back on the road as quickly as possible.

Grayson Brulte:

You're eliminating stress then for the chipper. Are you running it as a SAS model or how are you doing that? 

Tim Dawkins:

So we position it as freight capacity as a service. So ultimately the customer pays us by the load that we move for them. And we're trying to meet them in the model that they're used to paying for their freight with their existing carriers or logistic partners. So ultimately they just charge us by the load, but we provide so much more value through those freight electrification tools and through the providing provision of those electric and autonomous trucks.

Grayson Brulte: 

So to learn about all these electric trucks, did you have the Einride Santa's workshop where every time a new model comes out, your engineers get a new toy to play with, and so you can learn the pluses and the minus of every new electric truck.

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. I've had some terrific days of work. I will tell you where I've gone down to a track and we've had the opportunities to drive a few back to back. And let me just say that five-year-old Tim had a fantastic day of work getting to ride in so many so many big rigs in one day, but it's a really, it is a really unique position to be in as a company because we have all of these insights from testing and evaluating all these trucks and then operating them with customers.

So we can tell you the difference between a Scania and a BYD. And how they perform over 100,000, 200,000 miles, how they go through tires, how they what their maintenance needs are like, and what the cost of ownership is like. Because we're doing it with various customers in various markets at the moment.

And even right down to charging and battery health. All those insights are... really powerful for us. And as someone who works with our autonomous truck that we develop in house, I try and make sure that our team is constantly learning from, the customer feedback, the operational feedback that we're getting from those vehicles, because it's such a powerful source of information as we think about designing our next generation trucks in house.

Grayson Brulte: 

You're gathering a lot of data. That's, frankly, it's going to allow you to learn. Are you taking the data and the learning and then putting that into the autonomous truck development and taking the best of, let's call it, and putting it into the best of your version of an autonomous truck? 

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. And we're taking it one step further, actually using our connected electric trucks as an opportunity to trial new technologies and solutions that we want to integrate into our autonomous trucks. So one of the technologies we've trialed recently is we've implemented a smart tire treadwear sensor which goes inside the tire up on the inside of the tread surface and is able to monitor the health of the tires across axles by looking for differences in vibration and rotational speed that can tell us before.

An issue emerges that we've got an issue coming. So through that with customers, we've been able to identify potential blowouts before they happen and even identify issues with suspension alignment and misloading and stuff like that with our various vehicles. That's the technology that we tested out with the customer with CETs. And we're now looking to implement on our autonomous electric trucks. 

Grayson Brulte:

Do your fleet manager customers, do they have to monitor that? Or is that part of the service where you monitor that and you just call over to the shop and say, Hey, we're going to swap out this truck during your downtime because of X, Y, and Z issue.

Tim Dawkins:

Yeah, so we have a full fleet operations team and they are absolute rock stars and they are, but a phone call away so that if one of our customers, so much as knocks off a door mirror, we're able to come down to that customer site and get that truck swapped out with a new one so that they can keep operating and moving goods.

And then we will take that back to our maintenance center and get it up and running again for them as quickly as possible. 

Grayson Brulte:

When you're testing, you're validating. The new electric trucks. Do you put it through a safety course, a safety rigor, so you can determine that it meets the end right safety standards before deploying it to your customers. So you're not just taking the manufacturer's word for it. You're putting it through. Let's call it the Tim test where you're poking and prodding on every which thing under the sun. 

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. Yeah, with every truck we take to a customer site, we do a pre delivery inspection. So we'll go around and we'll look at all of the standard inspection, standard things you expect to look at.

So brakes, tires, lights, make sure everything's correct and working and functioning correctly. Take it for a test drive and then sign it off to deploy it with a customer equally when, if a customer, say has getting a new truck and they're swapping out with an old one. Then we'll bring that old truck back in.

We'll inspect it again and we'll do it, do a little refurbishment work if necessary, before finding a customer that we can redeploy it with. 

Grayson Brulte:

You're the real deal. Where are you looking to deploy the Saga platform? Is it in the EU or where are you looking to deploy it? Do you want to deploy it globally? You want to deploy it in America? Where are you looking to deploy it? 

Tim Dawkins:

Saga is a truly global product and it's built to shape and adapt to our customer needs. And it's constantly evolving through the AI and through the back end that we've built for it. So at the moment we have customers using Saga in three continents and eight countries.

And their reasons for engaging with Saga might be slightly different. So some of our European customers might have picked it up because they're concerned about emissions reduction and they want to have a platform that can help them analyze their CO2 footprint. Whereas some of our American customers might have.

Engage with us and picked it up because they're just, they're all focused on efficiency and they need to digitalize their freight moves today, but suffice to say yeah, it's something that we believe we can truly scale around the world and really is a very powerful platform. 

Grayson Brulte:

Is that the platform that's going to the UAE development where Enron autonomous trucks and human electric battery trucks be deployed in a 550-kilowatt hour Falcon RISE grid area? 

Tim Dawkins:

NRI grids and the Falcon Rise grid are really the flagship of what we can achieve when we deploy all of our technologies at scale. The grid is what happens when you have multiple customers in one area that are able to pull resources and capitalize on the infrastructure that we've built out to support them.

So that enables us to share the charging infrastructure and all that network infrastructure that we need for our electric trucks and our autonomous trucks to operate at scale, and it enables us to pool assets, pool resources, and build a faster moving and more adaptable ecosystem around supporting multiple customers.

That is the vision for how we see the world of freight operating in the future, and the Falcon Rise grid is going to be the biggest and most comprehensive deployment that we've done of all these technologies including our autonomous trucks At scale. So you'll see the whole ecosystem include from the human driven trucks, the autonomous trucks, the charging, and our customers using Saga working as one efficient machine to move freight between these various hubs in the UAE. So we're really excited. And we're really looking forward to showing with our partners what we can do on such a big scale. 

Grayson Brulte:

Do you define a career as an ODD, the operational design domain of where you're going to operate or is it more technical nuance to it? 

Tim Dawkins:

The grid is a system of systems, if you will. So it's the whole network of the human driven trucks managing this part of the flow, including a distribution hub, charging hubs, and then all of the various nodes that the customer will be moving through. So it's really the emergent sum of all of the parts moving together and working as one. The ODDs are specific parts of the leg, if you will, and we'll get into that more later, I'm sure. 

Grayson Brulte:

Since you're going to have human driven trucks and you're going to have autonomous trucks from a safety perspective, how are you planning for this deployment? 

Tim Dawkins:

It's about identifying which parts of the leg are suitable for automation. At the end of the day, that really is how we first approach any autonomous truck deployment. And then, from there, we want to make sure that we've got a software release and a vehicle that's capable of fulfilling all of those parts of the flow autonomously and as efficiently as possible. And ultimately, that question of efficiency is what we always come back to.

Because if a human driver can do it better, then we have access to that resource and we can deploy that instead. So we only deploy our autonomous truck where it makes sense for us to do so yeah, once we've identified the legs or the flow that we're looking to automate, then we'll do some further analysis to generate a target operating domain definition. So the TOD, that's the conditions that we'll be operating in. And then the release candidate will have its own ODD definition that's designed to handle. So think of that as a spec of capabilities that it comes with. And what we'll do is we'll compare; this is the target domain. This is what the release can do, and we'll go through and make sure that those capabilities match, and we'll do a verification exercise to make sure that we can prove that those capabilities are being met.

And so all of that rolls up into a safety case which includes, lots of simulation data, it includes the goals and the arguments and the evidence, and that we can operate safely in that environment. And we'll export that in a site-specific format and review that with a regulator if necessary to prove that we've done our homework, that we believe the vehicle operates safely, and we've got the right mitigations and measures in place for any challenges or faults that we anticipate.

Grayson Brulte:

Will your autonomous trucks operate in mixed traffic? Are you looking for... closed courses, closed roads, or how is it going to be deployed?

Tim Dawkins:

So we've been operating our autonomous trucks on public roads in Europe since 2019. In 2022, we did our first public road pilot in the United States with our partner, General Electric Appliances in Tennessee.

We did a lot of work with NHTSA to get permission to bring in and operate the first ever cabless electric autonomous truck. On us roads. And so we have been operating on public roads. We also operate them on private sites. Ultimately, as I said it's a really useful industrial workhorse. So we'll go wherever our customer thinks they can use this product efficiently. 

Grayson Brulte:

When it comes to when you're working with NHTSA or global regulators, you have the safety among. But is the underlying linchpin trust between what you're doing from a safety perspective and the regulator that they believe in what you're doing? Is that linchpin that holds us together?

Tim Dawkins:

We believe in being transparent with regulators. So we will often show them the full safety case if necessary for a deployment. Or at the very least, we will come and say, look, this is the operation we're planning, walk them through the details, and we'll go through the various features and functions of the system, its capabilities, its limitations, and the challenges that we anticipate in that particular operating environment.

And ultimately our mission is to make them comfortable with what we're doing and to give them the confidence to sign off on the deployment. So we believe in being transparent with those regulators in those circumstances. And we're always happy to spend time with them going through the technical details to get them whatever information they need.

Grayson Brulte:

Traditional human driven truck has blinkers, turning left, turning right. It has airbags. It has air brakes. What safety features are built into your autonomous truck? Do you have to have blinkers? Do you have to have lights? What does that look like? 

Tim Dawkins:

Like most autonomous vehicles the Einride AET has various types of sensor. So we've got 2D lidars, we've got 3D lidars, we've got radars, we've got cameras, which are used for the vehicle to. sense and detect objects and navigate through its environment. And then we've got some conventional, I suppose you might call them passive safety features, given that this is an SAE podcast.

And so we have some crash protection measures. We've got some underride protection guards, things like that you would find on a normal truck or trailer. And we've done a high degree of crash worthiness analysis to make sure that we've packaged all the sensitive high voltage bits in a way that will protect them in event of a collision with another vehicle.

And then we have a few features like a pedestrian friendly low bumper and skirts, which go around the vehicle, which would help us in the event of a collision with a pedestrian. So we really have thought through the design as much as possible to try and incorporate. So many of the conventional safety features that we can into the vehicle to make it as safe as possible in the event that someone crashes into us, or heaven forbid we're involved in a collision.

But you'll be right to notice that we don't have a few things like a windshield, we don't have any wing mirrors, and because we're a cabless vehicle we've done away with all of the human operator type safety features for the time being.

Grayson Brulte:

But with that design, I'm assuming it allows you to store more cargo. Is that fair? 

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. The number one reason is so that we can maximize the space for cargo. So if you take a look at a picture of our truck, you'll see the bulb, which is the front bit with the shiny plastic black panel on the front. That's where all the brains of the truck and the compute lives.

And then about 12 inches behind that it's all cargo hole all the way to the end of the vehicle. So it really is built around making every cubic inch that we can for moving goods. 

Grayson Brulte:

What type of range are these trucks going to have?

Tim Dawkins:

So autonomous electric truck today goes about 120 miles. And when it's unladen, it doesn't have the biggest battery in the world, but obviously once you start putting heavy goods in there, that range starts to come down as you would expect, since physics is a bit of a stubborn one and you can't get the better of it, unfortunately.

Grayson Brulte:

No, it is, but that's a great, consistent route if you're going from. Hub to hub within say a 50-mile range and you have a full load You go that 150 mile range you charge it you go back you charge if you go back and forth There's a lot of operations around the world that have that there. One of them is drayage.

Is this a potential deployment for drayage? Because some of the railheads don't go right into the port. And then there's the big movement, at least here in the United States, Port of Savannah has an inland port. I think you're roughly 50 miles. Is that an example, because it's just going to go back and forth all day, is that an example of how this can be deployed?

Or look at Japan, for example. The Japanese government's building dedicated lanes for heavy duty autonomous trucks. Is that another example where your truck can just go back and forth all day moving goods? 

Tim Dawkins:

Drayage is a great use case for electric trucking in general. So one of our biggest customers in the United States is Maersk, who are one of the largest shipping companies in the world.

And they're operating our human driven connected electric trucks out of various ports in the United States. So as you said, drayage runs are. You know a couple dozen miles each way at best and so with today's battery electric trucks They're able to do potentially a whole day's worth of driving without the need to charge so It's definitely a great use case for human driven trucks today and autonomous trucks, in the near future as well. 

Grayson Brulte:

You mentioned several times during this podcast Charging is that and right partnering with a third-party charging and putting your software layer on it.

Are you building the charging on your own? Because if I'm looking at a drayage-type operation, obviously you're gonna for comfort reasons, you're gonna need charging on both sides. Is that something that part of your it's called the end right package that the chart you said the charge goes with it.

But is that all go in your software is something you're building your partnering with? Or what does that look like? 

Tim Dawkins:

Yes, NRI provides the charging solution along with the trucks that our customer purchases from us. If they only take a few trucks from us that are operating out of a single site, then we usually just install a couple of small chargers at that site to meet that demand.

But as you say, if they're doing a larger scale drayage operation where they've got 50, 60 trucks operating out of a single port, then we need to go a little bit bigger than that. Here in the United States, we've built charging hubs. outside some of the key ports in the U S and one of the ones that's just gone live recently is our port of Los Angeles and port of Long Beach charging hub, where we've built the largest truck charging station in the U S to serve our customers’ needs.

So at the moment we've got the capacity for 90 trucks, but we're seeking to add more and more as we keep building and scaling that power delivery. And we believe that these hubs are the future of how a drayage operations can be electrified. Obviously, that's a big investment on our part. We do work with partners to provide the chargers and to provide the power management side of things.
But all of that data still comes back to Saga so that we can help our customer plan, their charging schedules, their driver schedules, and use those trucks as efficiently as possible. 

Grayson Brulte:

The hub model is interesting. You have Tera Watt. You have BP Pulse. You have a lot of large conglomerates that are well funded startups. Looking at that space, the one thing that we know is electric trucks, they're maturing, they're scaling, the technology is getting better. The range is increasing. The professional drivers are loving driving them. And that's a really good thing from that perspective. As electric trucks scale around the world, how's the end ride business going to evolve? Because I think about that. The truck's no longer ranges. Then as you're. technology for autonomy gets better that can go longer. How do you see the business of evolving? 

Tim Dawkins:

So we're really well positioned as the freight market wholesale goes electric. We believe we have great partners today that supply our connected electric trucks which give us great insights into how these vehicles are to operate and what their life cycle is over, various years deployed with our customers and these insights drive our own product development.

So we get to learn so much about, how these vehicles perform in operation, how they go through tires, how they go through brakes, and use that to inform our own product development in house. But as we continue to grow. Our focus will go from deploying and scaling to efficiency. So becoming more efficient in our operations, building critical mass by activating multiple customers in a region.

So if we've invested a ton of money in building a hub, we want to identify and bring customers in as much as possible locally to maximize the utilization of that asset. And then from there, we want to start building networks and grids of multiple customers. That will enable us to pool assets and drive down cost for all of them So they might share access to a pool of several dozen vehicles That we again manage fully for them and just send a driver down whenever they need to move a load But we're able to offer that at a lower cost by doing it out of a centralized location And then on the technology front, obviously, we're going to continue to grow as the technology evolves.

So as we get more range out of our human driven trucks through advances in battery technology. We might be able to unlock more use cases, be able to move into long haul models using a pony express relay type setup. And then with our autonomous truck, as we continue to develop that software, we'll have more automation available to us.

We'll have more use cases, more form factors, different types of vehicles, different types of goods, all coming in the years to come. It's a really exciting time for us, and we're just starting to achieve that scale today, and we're really looking forward to continuing to grow.

Grayson Brulte:

How do you ensure that you don't lose a focus on safety? Because a lot of companies throughout history, they focus on efficiency and safety goes by the wayside. How do you keep that culture of safety or that emphasis or focus on safety as you focus on the business becoming more efficient? 

Tim Dawkins:

So safety is one of three Einride pillars, along with equity and sustainability. And these three pillars guide everything that we do. Safety is my full-time job at the end of the day. It's my job to make sure that everyone in the company understands how the decisions that they make impact the safety of our products, whether that's a software engineer who's, wondering how a single line of code could affect how a 26, 000 vehicle behaves on the road, to even our sales and marketing folks, understanding the message that we need to give to our customers to assure them But we are a safe company.

So we invest a lot. My team invests a lot of effort behind the scenes in creating systems and processes that enable everybody to deliver a safe product and to be the checker, to make sure that we are making the right decisions along the way, that we're choosing the right solutions for our customers and we're doing our homework. And we're checking every box along the way to deploying a safe product. 

Grayson Brulte:

So there's a culture of safety where your colleagues all buy into that. And nobody's cutting corners because they believe in the mission. 

Tim Dawkins:

Absolutely. And we believe in the accountability that comes with that culture, but we also believe in having a zero-blame culture. So in the event that we do have an issue, we all take a step back and we say, okay, what can we learn from this? How can we prevent this from happening again? And what do we need to move forward? So culture is everything when it comes to safety. Really, we try and empower every leader, every manager, every employee with the knowledge that they can speak up if they feel something's an issue and that they can they have a meaningful role in the safety of our products at the end of the day.

Grayson Brulte:

It comes down to culture. No matter what you're building a product, you're building a widget, you're launching a TV show without the right culture, nothing scales and you clearly have the right culture at Einride. In your opinion, Tim? What is the future of Enright? 

Tim Dawkins:

I think it's a bright future. We've got great traction with our customers around the world today, and we have some great partners. Companies like Carlsberg, like PepsiCo, like Maersk. These are big household names that move a lot of goods, and they trust us with their logistics needs. It's really validating for me and for many of my colleagues that so many of these big companies have said, yes, we will write you a multiyear contract and we trust you to deliver.

So we've got this great traction and all we need to do is keep deploying, keep showing that we can deliver and keep showing that we can scale this technology. And. At the end of the day, the future of freight is electric, and we're really well positioned to provide that technology for the customers that want it the most today.

Grayson Brulte:

When your customers trust you, you have a healthy business. As we look to wrap up this insightful conversation, what would you like our listeners take away with them today? 

Tim Dawkins:

So the one thing I want you to remember from this podcast is that the future of freight is digital, electric, and autonomous. And we see these technologies working together as an ecosystem.

Human driven trucks. Autonomous trucks, they each have their advantages and we see a role for human drivers in the future and for many years to come. But the whole future of freight will be an efficient logistics ecosystem that leverages the all the benefits of those technologies together.

Grayson Brulte:

Einride's building the future of the freight ecosystem. Today is tomorrow, tomorrow is today, the future is Einride. Tim, thank you so much for coming on SAE Tomorrow Today. 

Tim Dawkins:

Thank you, Grayson, it's been a pleasure.

Grayson Brulte:

Thank you for listening to SAE Tomorrow Today. If you've enjoyed this episode and would like to hear more, please kindly rate, review, and let us know what topics you'd like for us to explore next.

Be sure to join us next week for another episode of SAE Tomorrow Today Unplugged, where I'll share my thoughts and insights into markets and the future of mobility. 

SAE International makes no representations as to the accuracy of the information presented in this podcast. The information and opinions are for general information only.

SAE International does not endorse, approve, recommend, or certify any information, product, process, service, or organization presented or mentioned in this podcast.

 

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