1919-01-01

THE STORY OF THE UNITED STATES STANDARD TRUCK 190009

THE United States was practically unprepared in the field of military motor-transport at the beginning of the war. Due largely to the cooperation of the Society of Automotive Engineers and its members individually, this handicap was overcome and a position stronger in this respect than that of any of the other belligerents was attained. The early efforts and the cooperation between the Society and the various Government departments are described, especially with reference to the Quartermaster Corps which at that time had charge of all motor transportation.
Regarding the Class B truck, it is shown that the Society acted as a point of contact between the various members of the industry and the War Department and, although not fostering any program or plan of its own, it was largely responsible for the success of the standardization program conceived and carried out by the Army. This standardization program has been amply justified by the history of the production of this truck, as well as by the record it made in this country and overseas. The advantages and the absolute necessity for standardization are emphasized by the fact that 214 types of vehicle were used by the American troops in France. The absurdity of maintaining and operating such a heterogeneous collection of vehicles is obvious, because the Army motor-transport could have been handled by a total of fourteen types.
The value of cooperation between the Society and Army has thus been amply demonstrated. This, in itself, emphasizes the necessity for even greater cooperation in the future.

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