1933-01-01

The WHY and HOW of THE RUBBER-TIRED RAILROAD-COACH 330001

Railroads are facing a crisis in operating costs, the urge toward reduction of unnecessary weight has become widespread and the crusade for noise abatement is no longer to be denied, according to the author. The pneumatic-tired railroad-coach not only answers these requirements, he says, but anticipates a demand for a new traveling comfort.
The desire to rubberize railroad equipment is old but much fruitless research has resulted from directing it chiefly toward solid-rubber or cushion tires. Road and rail surfaces present entirely different problems so far as the tire is concerned. No uniformity of conditions obtains on highways but rails are even and smooth. A badly aligned joint such as would wreck a metal wheel makes no impression on a pneumatic tire. As simple as the tire problem may seem, its solution represents years of courageous and skillful research on the part of the Michelin company in France. Out of this has been evolved a rail-car tire which has a life comparable with that of tires in highway service and therefore is commercially acceptable.
Facts from tire-performance data are stated and it is shown that light coach weight is the major need. The Budd-Michelin rail-coach is described and also the Reading-65 rail-coach. Weight comparisons are made and rail-coach body-design is discussed, as well as cost of weight.

SAE MOBILUS

Subscribers can view annotate, and download all of SAE's content. Learn More »

Access SAE MOBILUS »

Members save up to 43% off list price.
Login to see discount.
Special Offer: With TechSelect, you decide what SAE Technical Papers you need, when you need them, and how much you want to pay.
X