1941-01-01

The ALLISON AIRCRAFT-ENGINE DEVELOPMENT 410137

THIS paper recounts, step by step and model by model, the development of the Allison V-1710 aircraft engine - the first liquid-cooled military aircraft engine in production in this country.
Since 1930, when the design of this V-type 12-cyl engine was initiated, the powerplant has been stepped up from 650 hp without supercharging to 1000-1500 hp in its supercharged state, and the weight has increased from about 1000 lb to 1320 lb, the author reveals.
The following three underlying reasons are given for building the first V-1710 engine:
  1. 1.
    That the V-12 type of construction with its small frontal area could be installed with less drag than any other type of engine.
  2. 2.
    That a liquid-cooled engine could be operated at a higher power output per cubic inch due to the type and uniformity of cooling.
  3. 3.
    That the liquid-cooled engine would be more reliable because it is less sensitive to temporary overloads on account of the heat capacity and limiting temperatures (boiling) of the coolant.
Additional advantages discussed are flexibility of radiator installation and of engine location.

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