1943-01-01

DEFICIENCIES of CONVERTED PASSENGER AIRPLANES for CARGO TRANSPORT and OPERATING REQUIREMENTS 430167

SHORTCOMINGS of the converted passenger plane are at least 10 in number, says Mr. Froesch, classifying them as follows: (1) floor slope and irregularity of floor at door causing concentration of load at that point; (2) floors too weak, requiring reinforcing; (3) doors too narrow for entrance of bulky loads; (4) no anchorage for load fasteners; (5) no provisions for cargo handler station; (6) hard to distribute load so as to give a satisfactory center-of-gravity location; (7) lavatory in the wrong place; (8) insufficient fire extinguisher protection; (9) door sill heights too variable; (10) circular or oval fuselage shape, which cannot be used effectively.
A big problem is to get the rate down to the point where repeat business will follow. Eventually this might mean a 10 to 12¢ per mile rate under proper designing, Mr. Froesch declares. But, he says, size and capacity of the cargo plane cannot be predicted until a thorough analysis of the air express and freight market has been made.
A density-volume ratio of 8 to 9 lb per cu ft can be used, Mr. Froesch says, as a design criterion in figuring size of compartment. He points out heating and ventilation aspects of the cargo compartment and explains desirability of having a small compartment for protection of valuables close to the cockpit. The airplane should also be designed so that preventive maintenance and service methods can be best applied.

SAE MOBILUS

Subscribers can view annotate, and download all of SAE's content. Learn More »

Access SAE MOBILUS »

Members save up to 43% off list price.
Login to see discount.
Special Offer: With TechSelect, you decide what SAE Technical Papers you need, when you need them, and how much you want to pay.
X