1960-01-01

DESIGN OF A HIGH COMPRESSION RATIO TEST ENGINE FOR THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY 600107

The cooperative effort of the automotive and petroleum industries has advanced the efficiency, durability, and performance of automotive engines to present high levels.
In 1950, G. M. Research Laboratories designed and built a 287 cu. in. high compression ratio test engine furnished with three pairs of cylinder heads at compression ratios of 8:1, 10:1 and 12:1. This engine was made available to the petroleum industry as a part of the cooperative effort to improve engine-fuel relationship. The resulting improvement during the past 10 years of engines and fuels, plus the increase in displacement and horsepower, has established the need of a new representative test engine.
This paper describes a new 371 cu. in. V-8 test engine designed to operate at three compression ratios, 10:1, 12:1 and 15:1. The engine was produced as a result of numerous requests from the petroleum industry for an experimental engine suitable for the development of fuels and lubricants for higher compression ratios.
Structurally, the engine is considered adequate after extensive endurance operation under peak load conditions. Results of dynamometer tests indicate full throttle performance gains and fuel economy improvement with increasing ratios similar to those shown by Messrs. Caris and Nelson in their paper, “A New Look At High Compression Ratios” (1958).

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