1985-12-01

Rollover Crash Tests-The Influence of Roof Strength on Injury Mechanics 851734

Eight lateral dolly rollover tests were conducted on 1983 Chevrolet Malibusata nominal speed of 51.5 km/h (32 mi/h). Four of the vehicles had rollcages, and four had standard production roofs. Unrestrained outboard front GM Hybrid ill dummies with head and neck transducers were used. Numerous cameras documented the vehicle and dummy movements. Detailed vehicle kinematics data allowed quantitative analysis of the conditions for head and neck loads. For both roof structures, the dummies moved upward and outward from their seats due to rotation and acceleration of the vehicle. High head/neck loads were measured when the head contacted a part of the car experiencing a large change in velocity, often that part of the car which struck the ground. The results of this work indicate that roof strength is not an important factor in the mechanics of head/neck injuries in rollover collisions for unrestrained occupants. There was no significant difference in the occupant kinematics resulting from rollcaged and standard roof vehicles. There was no reduction in the incidence or severity of head/neck injuries in the rollcaged cars compared with the standard roof vehicles. The rollcaged vehicles incurred less glass breakage.

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