1998-09-29

A Comparison of the Safety Performance of Aluminum and Steel in Conventional Automotive Construction 982389

It is often said that heavier cars are inherently safer than lighter ones. However, when all cars are built with steel, larger size necessarily implies greater weight, so it is unclear whether the improved safety correlates to the weight or size of the vehicle. Using a publicly available computer model of the Ford Taurus, it was thought that this perception could be tested. The existing steel model, with the addition of a Hybrid III dummy and driver side airbag, was validated against actual crash test data. The structure was converted to aluminum, structural stiffness was calculated, and the steel and aluminum crash simulation results were compared. The aluminum model, utilizing monocoque sheet structure, weld bonded joining, and tailor welded blanks, weighed 200 kg less than the steel model and performed as well.

SAE MOBILUS

Subscribers can view annotate, and download all of SAE's content. Learn More »

Access SAE MOBILUS »

Members save up to 18% off list price.
Login to see discount.
Special Offer: Download multiple Technical Papers each year? TechSelect is a cost-effective subscription option to select and download 12-100 full-text Technical Papers per year. Find more information here.
We also recommend:
TECHNICAL PAPER

Macroscopic Constitutive Behaviors of Aluminum Honeycombs Under Dynamic Inclined Loads

2007-01-0979

View Details

TECHNICAL PAPER

Impact Response Prediction of Expanded Polypropylene Foam Energy Absorbers

2003-01-1296

View Details

TECHNICAL PAPER

Quasi-Static and Impact Strength of Fatigue Damaged Spot Welds

2003-01-0610

View Details

X