Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Search Results

Journal Article

Online Driveline Fatigue Data Acquisition Method

2013-04-08
2013-01-1270
Two on-line algorithms have been developed to acquire driveline component loads in terms of revolutions at torque and rainflow cycle counting matrix. These algorithms have been implemented in real-time on a standard engine controller unit and have been optimized for fast run-time and low memory requirements. The revolutions at torque algorithm is intended to count the number of driveshaft revolutions in each torque level for each gear and store the number of counts in the engine controller memory. The rainflow cycle counting algorithm is intended to count driveshaft torque cycles and to store the number of counts in a two dimensional “from-to” matrix format in the engine controller memory. The revolutions at torque histogram data and the rainflow cycle counting matrix are then downloaded from the vehicle using the data collection device. Download occurs when the vehicle is serviced at a dealership.
Journal Article

Rainflow Counting Based Block Cycle Development for Fatigue Analysis using Nonlinear Stress Approach

2013-04-08
2013-01-1206
An accurate representation of proving ground loading is essential for nonlinear Finite Element analysis and component fatigue test. In this paper, a rainflow counting based multiple blocks loading development procedure is described. The procedure includes: (1) Rainflow counting analysis to obtain the relationship between load range and cumulative repeats and the statistical relationship between load range and mean load; (2) Formation of preliminary multiple loading blocks with specified load range, mean load, and the approximate cycle repeats, and construction of the preliminary multiple loading blocks; (3) Calibration and finalization of the repeats for preliminary multiple loading blocks according to the equivalent damage rule, meaning that the damage value due to the block loads is equivalent to that from a PG loading.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Catalytic Converter Location and Palladium Loading on Tailpipe Emissions

2012-04-16
2012-01-1247
Meeting regulated tailpipe emission standards requires a full system approach by automotive engineers encompassing: engine design, combustion system metrics, exhaust heat management, aftertreatment design and exhaust system packaging. Engine and combustion system design targets define desired engine out exhaust constituents, exhaust gas temperatures and oil consumption rates. Protecting required catalytic converter volume in the engine bay for stricter tailpipe emission standards is becoming more difficult. Future fuel economy mandates are leading to vehicle downsizing which is affecting all aspects of vehicle component packaging. In this study, we set out to determine the potential palladium (Pd) cost penalty as a result of increased light-off time required as a catalyst is positioned further away from the engine. Two aged converter systems with different Pd loadings were considered, and EPA FTP-75 emission tested at six different catalyst positions.
Journal Article

Assessing Dirlik's Fatigue Damage Estimation Method for Automotive Applications

2012-04-16
2012-01-0757
Fatigue analysis in the time domain using the rainflow cycle counting algorithm is considered the most accurate method for estimating damage. Dirlik's method has been found to be very accurate for damage estimation in the frequency domain. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of Dirlik's method for ocean engineering and wind turbines but few have shown how well Dirlik performs in automotive applications. This study compares Dirlik's method with the rainflow cycle counting and with other frequency domain methods. The study analyzes measured data for an automotive component subjected to five test track load conditions. In addition, fourteen of Dirlik's original spectra and seven additional spectra which combine sine and random spectra are studied. It was found that Dirlik's method predicts more damage than the rainflow cycle counting method when applied to the original data used in creating the method.
Journal Article

A Fatigue Life Estimation Technique for Body Mount Joints

2012-04-16
2012-01-0733
A body mount joint is a typical clamped joint that is under severe loading conditions, due to its structural function services as a gateway of load path between body and frame of an automotive vehicle. Stresses/strains on durability concerned components at the joint cannot be captured accurately by using the pseudo stress analysis approach because of the complexity of stress state generated by the pre-stress from clamp load, contacts between the components and nonlinear material properties. In this paper, development of a technique for fatigue life estimation of the joint is described in detail.
Journal Article

Investigation of LEV-III Aftertreatment Designs

2011-04-12
2011-01-0301
Proposed LEV-III emission level will require improvements in NMOG, CO and NOx emissions as measured over FTP and US06 emission cycles. Incremental improvements in washcoat technologies, cold start calibration and catalyst system design are required to develop a cost effective solution set. New catalyst technologies demonstrated both lower HC and NOx emissions with 25% less platinum group metals (PGM). FTP and US06 emissions were measured on a 4-cylinder 2.4L application which compares a close-coupled converter and close-coupled + underfloor converter systems. A PGM placement study was performed with the close-coupled converter system employing these new catalyst technologies. Emissions results suggest that the placement of PGM is critical in minimizing emissions and PGM costs.
Journal Article

Fatigue Life Predictions under General Multiaxial Loading Based on Simple Material Properties

2011-04-12
2011-01-0487
A procedure for fatigue life estimation of components and structures under variable amplitude multiaxial loadings based on simple and commonly available material properties is presented. Different aspects of the analysis consisting of load cycle counting method, plasticity model, fatigue damage parameter, and cumulative damage rule are presented. The only needed material properties for the proposed procedure are hardness and monotonic and axial cyclic deformation properties (HB, K, n, K′ and n′). Rainflow cycle counting method is used for identifying number of cycles. Non-proportional cyclic hardening is estimated from monotonic and axial cyclic deformation behaviors. A critical plane approach is used to quantify fatigue damage under variable amplitude multiaxial loading, where only material hardness is used to estimate the fatigue curve, and where the needed deformation response is estimated based on Tanaka's non-proportionality parameter.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Based Damage Analysis with Correlation to Customer Duty Cycle Using Design Reliability and Confidence

2010-04-12
2010-01-0200
This paper will define the process for correlating fatigue based customer duty cycle with laboratory bench test data. The process includes the development of the Median and Design Load-Life curve equations. The Median Load-Life curve is a best fit linear regression; whereas, the Design Load-Life curve incorporates component specific reliability and confidence targets. To account for the statistical distribution of fatigue life, due to sample size, the one-side lower-bound tolerance limit method ( Lieberman, 1958 ) will be utilized. This paper will include a correlation between the predicted design fatigue life and the actual product life.
Technical Paper

Monotonic and Fatigue Behavior of Magnesium Extrusion Alloy AM30: An International Benchmark Test in the “Magnesium Front End Research and Development Project”

2010-04-12
2010-01-0407
Magnesium alloys are the lightest structural metal and recently attention has been focused on using them for structural automotive components. Fatigue and durability studies are essential in the design of these load-bearing components. In 2006, a large multinational research effort, Magnesium Front End Research & Development (MFERD), was launched involving researchers from Canada, China and the US. The MFERD project is intended to investigate the applicability of Mg alloys as lightweight materials for automotive body structures. The participating institutions in fatigue and durability studies were the University of Waterloo and Ryerson University from Canada, Institute of Metal Research (IMR) from China, and Mississippi State University, Westmorland, General Motors Corporation, Ford Motor Company and Chrysler Group LLC from the United States.
Technical Paper

Digital Image Correlation System Application - Measuring Deformation and Load of Convertible Top Fabric

2010-04-12
2010-01-0954
Strain gages have been widely used for measuring strain or deformation. They are very reliable and accurate. However, for application on fabric material, strain gages have their limitations. In this paper, digital image correlation (DIC) is used to measure the deformation around the rear window on a convertible top. The test needed to be non destructive, the vehicle and convertible top could not be damaged. The deformation or strain measured on the fabric was used to estimate the force experienced at the interface between the glass and the fabric during an opening/closing application. A speckle pattern was created on the convertible fabric where deformation was to be measured with washable paint. The image of the measured area was first recorded. The convertible top was then latched down and the fabric was stretched. A second image was recorded again. Based on the two images, the deformation/strain between the two conditions was measured.
X