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Technical Paper

Impact of Decarburization on the Fatigue Life of Powder Metal Forged Connecting Rods

2001-03-05
2001-01-0403
A main requirement for a satisfactory function and service life of a forged powder metal connecting rod is the fatigue strength. Fatigue strength mainly depends on design, material, microstructure, and surface condition. Much work has been accomplished to optimize these factors, but still a variety of surface defects such as localized porosity, roughness, oxide penetration, decarburization, etc., can be developed during manufacturing. These surface defects impact the fatigue strength in various ways. The impact of the decarburized layer depth on the fatigue life of a forged powder metal connecting rod is the focus of this work. Several connecting rods were submitted to a Weibull test at the same loading pattern. After the fatigue tests, the connecting rods were divided into groups with different decarburized layer depths. Both Maximum Likelihood Estimates (MLE) and Rank Regression (RR) techniques were used to analyze test results from all the groups obtained.
Technical Paper

Development of a Desulfurization Strategy for a NOx Adsorber Catalyst System

2001-03-05
2001-01-0510
The aggressive reduction of future diesel engine NOx emission limits forces the heavy- and light-duty diesel engine manufacturers to develop means to comply with stringent legislation. As a result, different exhaust emission control technologies applicable to NOx have been the subject of many investigations. One of these systems is the NOx adsorber catalyst, which has shown high NOx conversion rates during previous investigations with acceptable fuel consumption penalties. In addition, the NOx adsorber catalyst does not require a secondary on-board reductant. However, the NOx adsorber catalyst also represents the most sulfur sensitive emissions control device currently under investigation for advanced NOx control. To remove the sulfur introduced into the system through the diesel fuel and stored on the catalyst sites during operation, specific regeneration strategies and boundary conditions were investigated and developed.
Technical Paper

Feasibility Study of an Online Gasoline Fractionating System for use in Spark-Ignition Engines

2001-03-05
2001-01-1193
A fuel fractionating system is designed and commissioned to separate standard gasoline fuel into two components by evaporation. The system is installed on a Ricardo E6 single cylinder research engine for testing purposes. Laboratory tests are carried out to determine the Research Octane Number (RON) and Motoring Octane Number (MON) of both fuel fractions. Further tests are carried out to characterize Spark-Ignition (SI) and Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAI) combustion under borderline knock conditions, and these are related to results from some primary reference fuels. SI results indicate that an increase in compression ratio of up to 1.0 may be achieved, along with better charge ignitability if this system is used with a stratified charge combustion regime. CAI results show that the two fuels exhibit similar knock-resistances over a range of operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Study of a Stratified-Charge DISI Engine with an Air-Forced Fuel Injection System

2000-06-19
2000-01-2901
A small-bore 4-stroke single-cylinder stratified-charge DISI engine using an air-forced fuel injection system has been designed and tested under various operating conditions. At light loads, fuel consumption was improved by 16∼19% during lean, stratified-charge operation at an air-fuel ratio of 37. NOx emissions, however, were tripled. Using EGR during lean, stratified-charge operation significantly reduced NOx emissions while fuel consumption was as low as the best case without EGR. It was also found that combustion and emissions near the lean limit were a strong function of the combination of injection and spark timings, which affect the mixing process. Injection pressure, air injection duration, and time delay between fuel and air injections also played a role. Generating in-cylinder air swirl motion slightly improved fuel economy.
Technical Paper

FordS Zero Emission P2000 Fuel Cell Vehicle

2000-11-01
2000-01-C046
The P2000 Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle developed by Ford Motor Company is the first full-performance, full-size passenger fuel cell vehicle in the world. This development process has resulted in a vehicle with performance that matches some of today's vehicles powered by internal combustion engines. The powertrain in Ford's P2000 FCEV lightweight aluminum vehicle consists of an Ecostar electric motor/transaxle and a fuel cell system developed with XCELLSiS-The Fuel Cell Engine Company (formerly dbb Fuel Cell Engines, Inc.). Ballard's Mark 700 series fuel cell stack is a main component in the fuel cell system. To support this new FCEV, Ford has constructed the first North American hydrogen refueling station capable of dispensing gaseous and liquid hydrogen. On-going research and development is progressing to optimize fuel cell vehicle performance and refueling techniques.
Technical Paper

Design of an Integral Perforated Manifold, Muffler, and Catalyst

2001-03-05
2001-01-0222
The development of an integrated Perforated Manifold, Muffler, and Catalyst (PMMC) for an automotive engine exhaust system is described. The design aims to reduce tailpipe emissions and improve engine power while maintaining low sound output levels from the exhaust. The initial design, based on simplified acoustic and fluid dynamic considerations, is further refined through the use of a computational approach and bench tests. A final prototype is fabricated and evaluated using fired engine dynamometer experiments. The results confirm earlier analytical estimates for improved engine power and reductions of emissions and noise levels.
Technical Paper

Residual Gas Fraction Measurement and Estimation on a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Utilizing the Negative Valve Overlap Strategy

2006-10-16
2006-01-3276
This paper is concerned with the Residual Gas Fraction measurement and estimation on a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. A novel in-cylinder gas sampling technique was employed to obtain cyclic dynamic measurements of CO2 concentration in the compression stroke and in combination with CO2 concentration measurements in the exhaust stroke, cyclic Residual Gas Fraction was measured. The measurements were compared to estimations from a physical, 4-cylinder, single-zone model of the HCCI cycle and good agreement was found in steady engine running conditions. Some form of oscillating behaviour that HCCI exhibits because of exhaust gas coupling was studied and the model was modified to simulate this behaviour.
Technical Paper

Engine Radiated Noise Prediction Modeling Using Noise Source Decomposition and Regression Analysis

2005-05-16
2005-01-2383
An engine's radiated noise level is a very important attribute required for delivering customer satisfaction. Having an accurate radiated noise prediction capability during the planning, target setting, and initial design phases is critical to making the up-front decisions that enable the timely and cost efficient delivery of an engine that meets its radiated noise goals. This paper describes a simple radiated noise model that is based on a combination of regression modeling and simplified analytical modeling. The regression model uses measured data from multiple tests that can be broken down to noise sources such as mechanical, combustion, and accessory components. The simple analytical models are used to determine the parameters that the decomposed noise data is regressed against. The model developed in the paper is then compared to previous models suggested in the literature and to measured data from engines.
Technical Paper

A Predictive Model for Feedgas Hydrocarbon Emissions: An Extension to Warm Engine Maps

2005-10-24
2005-01-3862
A feedgas hydrocarbon emissions model that extends the usefulness of fully-warmed steady-state engine maps to the cold transient regime was developed for use within a vehicle simulation program that focuses on the powertrain control system (Virtual Powertrain and Control System, VPACS). The formulation considers three main sources of hydrocarbon. The primary component originates from in-cylinder crevice effects which are correlated with engine coolant temperature. The second component includes the mass of fuel that enters the cylinder but remains unavailable for combustion (liquid phase) and subsequently vaporizes during the exhaust portion of the cycle. The third component includes any fuel that remains from a slow or incomplete burn as predicted by a crank angle resolved combustion model.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Aging Temperature and Air-Fuel Ratio on the NOx Storage Capacity of a Lean NOx Trap

2004-03-08
2004-01-1493
This paper summarizes results from a study on the effects of aging temperature and A/F ratio on the NOx storage capacity of a lean NOx trap. When aged at stoichiometry at 700°C, the NOx storage capacity of the NOx trap dropped considerably during the first 200 hours of aging and then at a much slower rate beyond 200 hours. The NOx storage capacity dropped more rapidly as the aging temperature increased, with the drop in capacity particularly evident between 900°C and 1000°C. The drop in NOx capacity was significantly larger for samples aged with part-time lean operation and/or part-time rich operation than for samples aged continuously at stoichiometry. The detrimental effects of lean and rich operation increased as the temperature increased. A Pt/Al2O3 model catalyst was exposed to reducing conditions at temperatures ranging from 670°C to 1041°C and then to oxidizing conditions over the same temperature range, and in-situ XRD was used to investigate Pt particle coarsening.
Technical Paper

Demonstration of HCCI Using a Single Cylinder Four-stroke SI Engine with Modified Valve Timing

2000-10-16
2000-01-2870
A standard port fuel injected, unthrottled single cylinder four-stroke SI engine, with a compression ratio of 10.3:1, and using standard gasoline fuel, has been adapted to operate in the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) mode, by modifying the valve timing. It has been found that over a speed range of between 1300 and 2000 rpm, and lambda values of between 0.95 and 1.1, stable operation is achieved without spark ignition. The internal EGR rate was estimated to be about 60%, and emissions of NOX were typically 0.25 g/kWh. Practical implementation of this HCCI concept will require variable valve timing, which will also enable reversion to standard SI operation for maximum power.
Technical Paper

A Generic Methodology for Chamber Flame Geometry Modeling

2000-10-16
2000-01-2797
Combustion flame geometry calculation is a critical task in the design and analysis of combustion engine chamber. Combustion flame directly influences the fuel economy, engine performance and efficiency. Currently, many of the flame geometry calculation methods assume certain specific chamber and piston top shapes and make some approximations to them. Even further, most methods can not handle multiple spark plug set-ups. Consequently, most of the current flame geometry calculation methods do not give accurate results and have some built-in limitations. They are particularly poor for adapting to any kind of new chamber geometry and spark plug set-up design. This report presents a novel methodology which allows the accurate calculation of flame geometry regardless of the chamber geometry and the number of spark plugs. In this methodology, solid models are used to represent the components within the chamber and unique attributes (colors) are attached respectively to these components.
Technical Paper

Correlating Stressed Environmental Testing of Structural Composites to Service

2001-03-05
2001-01-0094
A compact in-situ tensile stress fixture was designed for the study of the combined effects of stress and automotive environments on structural glass fiber-reinforced composite materials. With this fixture, a standardized 300 hour laboratory screening test was developed to compare the residual property loss of composite materials due to concurrent exposure to stress and environment. It is of great importance that the data gathered in the laboratory have correlation to on-vehicle (in-service) performance, and that both lab and real world data be taken with a test system (in-situ test fixtures) capable of providing accurate and consistent results under either test condition.
Technical Paper

Intra-Parcel Collision Model for Diesel Spray Simulations

2008-10-06
2008-01-2426
Multidimensional models that are used for engine computations must include spray sub-models when the fuel is injected into the cylinder in liquid form. One of these spray sub-models is the droplet interaction model, which is separated into two parts: first, calculation of a collision rate between drops, and second, calculation of the outcome once a collision has occurred. This paper focuses on the problem of calculating the collision rate between drops accurately. Computing the collision rate between drops or particles when they are non-uniformly distributed and sharp gradients are present in their distribution is a challenging task. Traditionally the collisions between parcels of drops have been computed using the same spatial grid as is used for the Eulerian gas-phase calculations. Recently it has been proposed to use a secondary grid for the collision rate calculation that is independent of the gas-phase grid, as is done in the NTC collision algorithm.
Technical Paper

The Impact of Engine Design Constraints on Diesel Combustion System Size Scaling

2010-04-12
2010-01-0180
A set of scaling laws were previously developed to guide the transfer of combustion system designs between diesel engines of different sizes [ 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ]. The intent of these scaling laws was to maintain geometric similarity of key parameters influencing diesel combustion such as in-cylinder spray penetration and flame lift-off length. The current study explores the impact of design constraints or limitations on the application of the scaling laws and the effect this has on the ability to replicate combustion and emissions. Multi dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations were used to evaluate the relative impact of engine design parameters on engine performance under full load operating conditions. The base engine was first scaled using the scaling laws. Design constraints were then applied to assess how such constraints deviate from the established scaling laws and how these alter the effectiveness of the scaling effort.
Technical Paper

Ford 2011 6.7L Power Stroke® Diesel Engine Combustion System Development

2011-04-12
2011-01-0415
A new diesel engine, called the 6.7L Power Stroke® V-8 Turbo Diesel, and code named "Scorpion," was designed and developed by Ford Motor Company for the full-size pickup truck and light commercial vehicle markets. The combustion system includes the piston bowl, swirl level, number of nozzle holes, fuel spray angle, nozzle tip protrusion, nozzle hydraulic flow, and nozzle-hole taper. While all of these parameters could be explored through extensive hardware testing, 3-D CFD studies were utilized to quickly screen two bowl concepts and assess their sensitivities to a few of the other parameters. The two most promising bowl concepts were built into single-cylinder engines for optimization of the rest of the combustion system parameters. 1-D CFD models were used to set boundary conditions at intake valve closure for 3-D CFD which was used for the closed-cycle portion of the simulation.
Technical Paper

EGR Cooler Performance Monitor - Heuristic Approaches Using Temperature Measurement

2011-04-12
2011-01-0707
This paper investigates model free approaches to monitor the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) for a diesel engine equipped with EGR cooler and EGR cooler bypass valve. A conventional way of monitoring the EGR cooler is a model based approach which involves modeling the EGR cooler effectiveness and compares the modeled (estimated) EGR cooler effectiveness (or EGR cooler downstream temperature) and the measured EGR cooler effectiveness (or EGR cooler downstream temperature). The model based approach has the advantage of being portable across many different cooler configurations, but it requires modeling/calibration efforts and necessary temperature measurements. The EGR cooler downstream temperature serves several roles. It can be used together with the fresh air temperature to calculate the charge air temperature. It also can be utilized to monitor the performance of the EGR cooler as mentioned above.
Technical Paper

Ratio-Metric Hesitation Fuel Detection and Compensation in Power Split Hybrid Electric Vehicles

2011-04-12
2011-01-0882
Power Split Hybrids are unique when compared to conventional powertrains from the perspective that the engine speed is directly controlled by the motor/generator at all times. Therefore, traditional methods of detecting variations in fuel volatility do not apply for Power Split Hybrid based configurations. In their place, the Ratio-metric Fuel Compensation (RFC) method has been developed for Power Split Hybrid generator configurations to detect and compensate for engine hesitations within milliseconds of the first injection event. Furthermore, test results have shown that in the presence of low volatility fuel, RFC provides robust starts at the ideal lean air fuel ratio required for PZEV emissions compliance.
Technical Paper

Flow Noises Associated with Integrated Compressor Anti-Surge Valve

2011-05-17
2011-01-1532
Turbocharged gasoline engines are typically equipped with a compressor anti-surge valve or CBV (compressor by-pass valve). The purpose of this valve is to release pressurized air between the throttle and the compressor outlet during tip-out maneuvers. At normal operating conditions, the CBV is closed. There are two major CBV mounting configurations. One is to mount the CBV on the AIS system. The other is to mount the CBV directly on the compressor housing, which is called an integrated CBV. For an integrated CBV, at normal operating conditions, it is closed and the enclosed passageway between high pressure side and low pressure side forms a “side-branch” in the compressor inlet side (Figure 12). The cavity modes associated with this “side-branch” could be excited by shear layer flow and result in narrow band flow noises.
Technical Paper

Development of a One-Dimensional Engine Thermal Management Model to Predict Piston and Oil Temperatures

2011-04-12
2011-01-0647
A new, 1-D analytical engine thermal management tool was developed to model piston, oil and coolant temperatures in the Ford 3.5L engine family. The model includes: a detailed lubrication system, including piston oil-squirters, which accurately represents oil flow rates, pressure drops and component heat transfer rates under non-isothermal conditions; a detailed coolant system, which accurately represents coolant flow rates, pressure drops and component heat transfer rates; a turbocharger model, which includes thermal interactions with coolant, oil, intake air and exhaust gases (modeled as air), and heat transfer to the surroundings; and lumped thermal models for engine components such as block, heads, pistons, turbochargers, oil cooler and cooling tower. The model was preliminarily calibrated for the 3.5L EcoBoost™ engine, across the speed range from 1500 to 5500 rpm, using wide-open-throttle data taken from an early heat rejection study.
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