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Technical Paper

1997 GM 5.7 LITER LS1 V8 ENGINE

1997-02-24
970915
General Motors Powertrain Group (GMPTG) has developed an all new small block V8 engine, designated LS1, for introduction into the 1997 Corvette. This engine was designed to meet both customer requirements and competitive challenges while also meeting the ever increasing legislated requirements of emissions and fuel economy. This 5.7L V8 provides increased power and torque while delivering higher fuel economy. In addition, improvements in both QRD and NVH characteristics were made while meeting packaging constraints and achieving significant mass reductions.
Technical Paper

1996 GM 7.4 Liter Engine Upgrade

1996-02-01
960012
General Motors Powertrain Division has developed the next generation big block V8 engine for introduction in the 1996 model year. In addition to meeting tighter emission and on-board diagnostic legislation, this engine evolved to meet both customer requirements and competitive challenges. Starting with the proven dependability of the time tested big block V8, goals were set to substantially increase the power, torque, fuel economy and overall pleaseability of GM's large load capacity gasoline engine. The need for this new engine to meet packaging requirements in many vehicle platforms, both truck and OEM, as well as a requirement for minimal additional heat rejection over the engine being replaced, placed additional constraints on the design.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of Engine Models Via Automated Dynamometer Tests

1979-02-01
790178
An automated engine dynamometer test procedure is developed and mathematical models for the main engine control variables are derived from the resulting data base. The new procedure involves sequential testing at many speed/load conditions for various combinations of air fuel ratio, spark timing and exhaust gas recirculation. The total testing time required for generating the data base of more than 2000 test points is less than twelve hours. An independent transient speed/load test is also conducted for the purpose of validating the engine models. The measured and model predicted data are compared for this test which corresponds to a segment of the EPA urban schedule.
Technical Paper

General Motors Phase II Catalyst System

1978-02-01
780205
Three-way catalysts provide a means of catalytically achieving lower NOx emission levels while maintaining good control of HC and CO emissions. However, very accurate control of air-fuel ratio is necessary. The precise air-fuel ratio control required is accomplished by employing a closed loop fuel metering system in conjunction with an exhaust gas sensor and an electronic control unit. To gain production experience with this type of system, General Motors is introducing it on two 1978 engine families sold in California. One is a 2.5 litre L-4 engine and the other is a 3.8 litre V-6 engine. Closed loop controlled carburetors are used on both systems. This paper discusses these 1978 systems. The components used on both systems are described and emission and fuel economy results are reviewed.
Technical Paper

GENERAL MOTORS EXPERIMENTAL SAFETY VEHICLE-POWERTRAIN & FUEL SYSTEM

1973-02-01
730280
The Experimental Safety Vehicle powertrain and fuel system developed by General Motors in compliance with Contract DOT-OS-00095 with the U.S. Department of Transportation include several special features: a low engine accessory package to meet the front visibility down angle of 8 degrees, engine and transmission mounting for retention at high decelerations, a light aluminum engine, an over-the-rear-axle fuel tank, and a unique evaporative emission fuel pipe routing. A comprehensive test program was planned and final testing to validate contract specifications was conducted.
Technical Paper

A DIGITAL COMPUTER SIMULATION FOR SPARK-IGNITED ENGINE CYCLES

1963-01-01
630076
A comprehensive cycle analysis has been developed for four-stroke spark-ignited engines from which the indicated performance of a single cylinder engine was computed with a reasonable degree of accuracy. The step-wise cycle calculations were made using a digital computer. This analysis took into account mixture composition, dissociation, combustion chamber shape (including spark plug location), flame propagation, heat transfer, piston motion, engine speed, spark advance, manifold pressure and temperature, and exhaust pressure. A correlation between the calculated and experimental performance is reported for one engine at a particular operating point. The calculated pressure-time diagram was in good agreement with the experimental one in many respects. The calculated peak pressure was 10 per cent lower and the thermal efficiency 0.8 per cent higher than the measured values. Thus this calculational procedure represents a significant improvement over constant volume cycle approximations.
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