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Technical Paper

Indirect Measurement of Tire Slip and Understeer/Oversteer

2006-12-05
2006-01-3605
This paper presents a method for indirect measurement of tire slip angles from chassis acceleration, yaw rate, and steer angle measurements. The chassis is assumed to be rigid so that acceleration data can be integrated to estimate velocities of the front and rear of the vehicle, from which slip angles can be predicted. The difference in front and rear slip angles is indicative of vehicle oversteer/understeer. Understeer data can then be correlated with position on the track to better understand vehicle handling behavior, aiding the tuning process. The technique is presented, and shown to work well with simulated data, even when the data is corrupted with up to 20% noise. Therefore, the inversion process presented here is theoretically sound. However, when the technique is applied to measured data from race cars, it is shown to be inaccurate. One suspected problem is the difficulty of getting accurate yaw rate data.
Technical Paper

A Novel Suspended Liner Test Apparatus for Friction and Side Force Measurement with Corresponding Modeling

2006-11-13
2006-32-0041
An experimental apparatus and a numerical model have been designed and developed to examine the lubrication condition and frictional losses at the piston and cylinder interface. The experimental apparatus utilizes components from a single cylinder, ten horsepower engine in a novel suspended liner arrangement. The test rig has been specifically designed to reduce the number of operating variables while utilizing actual components and geometry. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with experimental measurements and provide further insight into the sources of frictional losses. The results demonstrate the effects of speed and viscosity on the overall friction losses at the piston and cylinder liner interface. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results show good agreement.
Technical Paper

Contribution of Sound to Perception of CVT Performance

2006-04-03
2006-01-0813
Three experiments examined the contribution of sound to the perception of performance using audio recordings made on a test track with a vehicle equipped with a continuously variable transmission (CVT) performing four different maneuvers with four transmission settings. Subjects rated the recordings based on their perceptions of power & performance, pleasantness, smoothness, and loudness. On the track, the low calibration setting (including a flat ratio schedule) had been rated higher for power & performance than the high calibration setting (including a rising ratio schedule). In Experiment 1, where subjects were unaware of the maneuver performed, there was no advantage for the low calibration setting; in Experiment 2, where subjects were aware of the maneuver, the power & performance ratings were opposite to those obtained on the test track. In Experiment 3, drivers of performance cars rated the recordings as more pleasant and smoother than did drivers of other vehicles.
Technical Paper

Measuring Particulate Load in a Diesel Particulate Filter

2006-04-03
2006-01-0868
A gravimetric particulate measurement system, which extracts samples isokinetically from raw exhaust, is presented to quantify the particulate mass stored in diesel particulate filters. The purpose of this measurement system is to facilitate the study of wall-flow filter behavior at different particulate load levels. Within this paper, the design considerations for the particulate measurement system are detailed and its operation is described. The accuracy of the measurement is examined through a theoretical error analysis and direct experimental comparison to the differential weight of a diesel particulate filter. Experimental results are also presented to validate the ability of the system to maintain the isokinetic sampling condition.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Cage Flexibility on Ball-to-Cage Pocket Contact Forces and Cage Instability in Deep Groove Ball Bearings

2006-04-03
2006-01-0358
Rolling element bearings provide near frictionless relative motion between two rotating parts. Automotive transmissions use various ball and rolling element bearings to accommodate the relative motion between rotating elements. In order to understand changes in bearing performance due to the loads imposed through the transmission, advanced modeling of the bearing is required. This paper focuses on the effects of cage flexibility on bearing performance. A flexible cage model was developed and incorporated into a six degree-of-freedom dynamic, deep groove ball bearing model. A lumped mass approach was used to represent the cage flexibility and was validated through an ANSYS forced response analyses of the cage. Results from the newly developed Flexible Cage Model (FCM) and an identical numerical model employing a rigid bearing cage were compared to determine the effects of varying ball-to-cage pocket clearance and cage stiffness on cage motion and ball-to-cage pocket contact forces.
Technical Paper

Dead Pedal and the Perception of Performance of a Continuously Variable Transmission

2005-04-11
2005-01-1596
The flat ratio schedule that maximizes the performance advantages of a CVT may also be a source of consumer resistance. A previous investigation of consumer perception did obtain maximum engine power and pickup ratings using the flat-ratio schedule, but some data were missing due to traffic conditions on public roads. This paper is a report of an experiment conducted at the Dearborn Proving Ground to confirm the flat-ratio-schedule advantage for engine power and pickup ratings, and to investigate further the effects of varying Dead Pedal. Driver ratings of engine power and pickup replicated the earlier findings, and an overall advantage of low Dead Pedal was found for ratings of engine power and pickup and for transmission smoothness.
Technical Paper

Derivation of the Three-Dimensional Installation Ratio for Dual A-Arm Suspensions

2004-11-30
2004-01-3535
Conventional suspension analysis of three-dimensional suspensions typically use two-dimensional analyses. This is done by projecting suspension components onto two-dimensional planes and then performing a two-dimensional analysis in each of these orthogonal planes or neglecting motions in one of the planes entirely. This requires multiple iterations because changes in one plane require a checking of their effects on motion in the other orthogonal planes. In doing so, much of the insight and accuracy gained from a three-dimensional analysis can be lost. A three-dimensional kinematic analysis approach is presented and applied to a dual A-Arm suspension system. All motions are considered instantaneously about a screw axis instead of a point as used by the usual two-dimensional modeling approach. The model predicts deflections of suspension components in response to the three-dimensional forces present at the contact patch.
Technical Paper

Novel Force-Based High-Speed Three-Dimensional NASCAR Vehicle Model

2004-11-30
2004-01-3525
Typical vehicle dynamics simulations demand a trade-off between short computation times and accuracy. Many of the more simple models are based on the kinematic roll center and the more accurate models tend to be multi-body dynamics simulation programs. There is a need for a model that improves the accuracy of the kinematic roll center models while still maintaining short computation times. Such a model could be used track-side during races to guide race teams toward improved handling. The model presented in this paper removes many of the assumptions and limitations of the kinematic roll center model. The model accounts for three-dimensional forces present at the contact patch and predicts deflections of suspension components. The modeling approach is applied to a NASCAR Craftsman Truck to predict the effects of suspension design and tuning on steady-state understeer characteristics of the vehicle. Braking and acceleration forces can also be applied to the vehicle.
Technical Paper

Education and Outreach Program Designed for NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training in Advance Life Support (ALS/NSCORT)

2004-07-19
2004-01-2418
The NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training in Advanced Life Support (ALS/NSCORT) Education and Outreach Program is designed to engage audiences through concepts and technologies highlighted in the NSCORT research program. The outreach program is composed of three thrust areas. These areas are technical outreach (graduate education, technology transfer, presentations to industry, etc.), educational outreach (professional development, undergraduate, K-12), and public outreach (museums, state fairs, etc.) Program design of the technical and educational outreach began in January 2003. This paper reports anecdotal data on one ALS/NSCORT outreach program and gives a brief description of the other programs in their pilot stages. Technical and educational outreach programs developed to date include: 1) Summer Fellowship Research Program, 2) Distance Learning Course, 3) Key Learning Community Collaborative Project and 4) Mission to Mars.
Technical Paper

Equivalent System Mass of Producing Yeast and Flat Breads from Wheat Berries, A Comparison of Mill Type

2004-07-19
2004-01-2525
Wheat is a candidate crop for the Advanced Life Support (ALS) system, and cereal grains and their products will be included on long-term space missions beyond low earth orbit. While the exact supply scenario has yet to be determined, some type of post-processing of these grains must occur if they are shipped as bulk ingredients or grown on site for use in foods. Understanding the requirements for processing grains in space is essential for incorporating the process into the ALS food system. The ESM metric developed by NASA describes and compares individual system impact on a closed system in terms of a single parameter, mass. The objective of this study was to compare the impact of grain mill type on the ESM of producing yeast and flat breads. Hard red spring wheat berries were ground using a Brabender Quadrumat Jr. or the Kitchen-Aid grain mill attachment (both are proposed post-harvest technologies for the ALS system) to produce white and whole wheat flour, respectively.
Technical Paper

A Wall-Modified Flamelet Model for Diesel Combustion

2004-03-08
2004-01-0103
In this paper, a wall-modified interactive flamelet model is developed for improving the modeling of Diesel combustion. The objective is to include the effects of wall heat loss on the transient flame structure. The essential idea is to compute several flamelets with several representative enthalpy defects which account for wall heat loss. Then, the averaged flamelet profile can be obtained through a linear fit between the flamelets according to the enthalpy defect of the local gas which results from the wall heat loss. The enthalpy defect is estimated as the difference between the enthalpy in a flamelet without wall heat loss, which would correspond to the enthalpy in the gas without wall heat loss, and the gas with wall heat loss. The improved model is applied to model combustion in a Diesel engine. In the application, two flamelets, one without wall heat loss and one with wall heat loss, are considered.
Technical Paper

Effects of Geometric Parameters on the Sound Transmission Characteristic of Bulb Seals

2003-05-05
2003-01-1701
Sound transmission through door and window sealing systems is one important contributor to vehicle interior noise. The noise generation mechanism involves the vibration of the seal due to the unsteady wall pressures associated with the turbulent flow over the vehicle. For bulb seals, sound transmission through the seal is governed by the resonance of the seal membranes and the air cavity within the bulb (the so-called mass-air-mass resonance). The objective of this study was to develop a finite element (FE) model to predict the sound transmission loss of elastomeric bulb seals. The model was then exercized to perform a parametric study of the influence of seveal seal design parameters. The results suggest that the sound transmission loss increases as the membrane thicknesses and/or the separation distance between the two seal walls are increased. The addition of additional internal “webs” was found to have adverse effects on the sound barrier performance.
Technical Paper

Lattice Boltzmann Simulations of Flows in a Duct with Multiple Inlets

2003-03-03
2003-01-0220
In this paper, computations of pulsating flows in a duct with multiple inlets using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) are reported. As future emissions standards present a significant challenge for Diesel engine manufacturers, several options are being investigated to identify strategies to meet such regulations. Exhaust gas aftertreatment is one of the most important among them. As the performance of the various aftertreatment devices is sensitive to the flow conditions in the exhaust, a greater understanding of the flows under pulsating conditions in the presence of multiple cylinders is needed. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) is a relatively new and promising computational approach for applications to fluid dynamics problems. Two advantages of the method relative to traditional methods are ease of implementation and ease of parallelization and performance on parallel computers.
Technical Paper

Influence of Wall Impingement on the Structure of Reacting Jets

2003-03-03
2003-01-1042
In Diesel engines, the vapor phase of the fuel jet is known to impinge on the walls. This impingement is likely to have an effect on mixing characteristics, the structure of the diffusion flame and on pollutant formation and oxidation. These effects have not been studied in detail in the literature. In this work, the structure of a laminar wall jet that is generated from the impingement of a free laminar jet on a wall is discussed. We study the laminar jet with the belief that the local structure of the reaction zone in the turbulent reacting jet is that of a laminar flame. Results from non-reacting and reacting jets will be presented. In the case of the non-reacting jets, the focus of the inquiry is on assessing the accuracy of the computed results by comparing them with analytical results. Velocity profiles in the wall jet, growth rates of the half-width of the jet and penetration rates are presented.
Technical Paper

An Experimentally Validated Physical Model of a High-Performance Mono-Tube Damper

2002-12-02
2002-01-3337
A mathematical model of a gas-charged mono-tube racing damper is presented. The model includes bleed orifice, piston leakage, and shim stack flows. It also includes models of the floating piston and the stiffness characteristics of the shim stacks. The model is validated with experimental tests on an Ohlins WCJ 22/6 damper and shown to be accurate. The model is exercised to show the effects of tuning on damper performance. The important results of the exercise are 1) the pressure variation on the compression side of the piston is insignificant relative to that on the rebound side because of the gas charge, 2) valve shim stiffness can be successfully modeled using stacked thin circular plates, 3) bleed orifice settings dominate the low speed regime, and 4) shim stack stiffness dominates the high speed regime.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Switched Capacitive Machines for Aerospace Applications

2002-10-29
2002-01-3182
Electric machinery is typically based upon the interaction of magnetic fields and current to produce electromagnetic force or torque. However, force and torque can also be produced through the use of electric fields. The purpose of this investigation is to briefly analyze the use of a switched capacitance electric field based machine to see if it may have aerospace applications for use as either propulsion motor for unmanned aerospace vehicle (UAV) or lightweight flywheel applications for aerospace applications. It is shown that although its use as a hub propulsion motor is not feasible, it may be a candidate for use in a power flywheel energy storage system.
Technical Paper

Digital Electrohydraulic Control for Constant-Deceleration Emergency Braking

2002-03-19
2002-01-1464
A digital electrohydraulic control system for emergency braking is designed, simulated, built, and tested. First, a dynamic model of the system was developed with Matlab Simulink. The parameters are obtained experimentally. Feedback gains are obtained by tuning the model. Then, the digital controller is implemented on an industrial personal computer programmed in Turbo C++. The control strategy is an improved digital version of the PID control. The key element in the control of the brake was an electro-hydraulic proportional pressure valve. Experiments show that the control system successfully realizes constant-deceleration emergency brake within mine safety rules. The same hardware can be reprogrammed for various hoists, different load conditions, and different control objectives. Although the test was conducted on a mine hoist brake, the control system can be applied to most vehicles.
Technical Paper

Dependence of Fuel-Air Mixing Characteristics on Injection Timing in an Early-Injection Diesel Engine

2002-03-04
2002-01-0944
In recent years, there has been an interest in early-injection Diesel engines as it has the potential of achieving a more homogeneous and leaner mixture close to top-dead-center (TDC) compared to standard Diesel engines. The more homogeneous mixture may result in reduced NOx and soot emissions and higher efficiency. Diesel engines in which a homogeneous mixture is achieved close to TDC are known as Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines. PREmixed lean DIesel Combustion (PREDIC) engines in which the start of fuel injection is considerably advanced in comparison with that of the standard Diesel engine is an attempt to achieve a mode of operation close to HCCI. Earlier studies have shown that in a PREDIC engine, the fuel injection timing affects the mixture formation and hence influences combustion and pollutant formation.
Technical Paper

An Evaluation of a Composite Model for Predicting Drop-Drop Collision Outcomes in Multidimensional Spray Computations

2002-03-04
2002-01-0943
The standard model for predicting the outcome of drop-drop collisions in sprays is one developed based on measurements in rain drops under atmospheric pressure conditions. This model includes the possible outcomes of grazing collisions and coalescence. Recent measurements with hydrocarbon drops and at higher pressure (up to 12 bar) indicate the possibility of additional outcomes: bounce, reflexive separation and drop shattering. The measurements also indicate that the Weber number range over which bounce occurs is dependent on the gas pressure. The probability of a drop-drop collision resulting in bounce increases with gas pressure. A composite model that includes all these outcomes as possibilities is employed to carry out computations in a constant volume chamber and in a Diesel engine. A sub-model for bounce that includes the pressure effects is also part of the composite model.
Technical Paper

Sound Transmission Through Elastomeric Sealing Systems

2001-04-30
2001-01-1411
The sound barrier performance of elastomeric vehicle weather seals was investigated. Experiments were performed for one bulb seal specimen following a reverberation room method. The seal wall vibration was measured using a laser Doppler vibrometer. The acoustic pressure near the seal surface was measured simultaneously, allowing the sound intensities on both side of the seal, and the sound transmission loss to be evaluated. The vibration response of the bulb seal and its sound transmission loss were then computed using the finite element method. Model predictions for the same seal geometry were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data within the frequency range of interest, comprised between 500 Hz and 4000 Hz.
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