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Technical Paper

A Computer Program for Calculating Properties of Equilibrium Combustion Products with Some Applications to I.C. Engines

1975-02-01
750468
A computer program which rapidly calculates the equilibrium mole fractions and the partial derivatives of the mole fractions with respect to temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio for the products of combustion of any hydrocarbon fuel and air is described. A subroutine is also given which calculates the gas constant, enthalpy, internal energy and the partial derivatives of these with respect to temperature, pressure and equivalence ratio. Some examples of the uses of the programs are also given.
Technical Paper

A Classification of Reciprocating Engine Combustion Systems

1974-02-01
741156
Obtaining and maintaining a stratified charge in a practical engine is a difficult problem. Consequently, many approaches have been proposed and reported in the scientific and patent literature. In attempting to assess the most profitable approach for future development work, it is important to group together similar approaches so that one can study their performance as a group. Making such a classification has the additional advantage of helping to standardize terminology used by different investigators. With this thought in mind, a literature study was made and a proposed classification chart prepared for the different engine combustion systems reported in the literature. For the sake of completeness, the finally proposed classification chart includes homogeneous combustion engines as well as heterogeneous combustion engines. Because of their similarity of combustion, rotary engines such as the Wankel engine are considered as “reciprocating” although gas turbines are not included.
Technical Paper

Mass Burning Rate in a Rotary Combustion Engine

1974-02-01
741089
This paper reports the mass-burning rate in a rotary combustion engine. The mass-burning rate is calculated through an iterative constituent and energy constraints during the combustion process. First approximation is obtained through the firing and motoring-pressure trace as recorded by an image-retaining oscilloscope and recorded subsequently by a polaroid camera. Effect of engine load, engine speed, relative (A/F) on the mass-burning rate and maximum heat release rate were studied. Three different type of fuels were used in the experimental test runs.
Technical Paper

Cyclic Variations and Average Burning Rates in a S. I. Engine

1970-02-01
700064
A method of calculating mass burning rates for a single cylinder spark-ignition combustion engine based on experimentally obtained pressure-time diagrams was used to analyze the effects of fuel-air ratio, engine speed, spark timing, load, and cyclic cylinder pressure variations on mass burning rates and engine output. A study of the effects on mass burning rates by cyclic pressure changes showed the low pressure cycles were initially slow burning cycles. Although large cyclic cylinder pressure variations existed in the data the cyclic variations in imep were relatively small.
Technical Paper

Simulation of a Crankcase Scavenged, Two-Stroke, SI Engine and Comparisons with Experimental Data

1969-02-01
690135
A detailed mathematical model of the thermodynamic events of a crankcase scavenged, two-stroke, SI engine is described. The engine is divided into three thermodynamic systems: the cylinder gases, the crankcase gases, and the inlet system gases. Energy balances, mass continuity equations, the ideal gas law, and thermodynamic property relationships are combined to give a set of coupled ordinary differential equations which describe the thermodynamic states encountered by the systems of the engine during one cycle of operation. A computer program is used to integrate the equations, starting with estimated initial thermodynamic conditions and estimated metal surface temperatures. The program iterates the cycle, adjusting the initial estimates, until the final conditions agree with the beginning conditions, that is, until a cycle results.
Technical Paper

Fuel - Engine Research in Universities

1968-02-01
680508
The reasons for conducting research in a university are presented and discussed. It is concluded that fuel-engine studies are compatible with these reasons and therefore are well suited for university research. Past studies in this field are summarized and unanswered questions and future topics suitable for university investigation are suggested. Included in the topics discussed are: instrumentation, thermodynamic description of working fluids, fuel vaporization and atomization, combustion, and instantaneous heat transfer and mass flow rates. The steps that need to be taken to ensure continuing university interest in fuel-engine studies are presented.
Technical Paper

Spark Ignition Engine Operation and Design for Minimum Exhaust Emission

1966-02-01
660405
The purpose of the tests conducted on a single-cylinder laboratory engine was to determine the mechanism of combustion that affect exhaust emissions and the relationship of those mechanisms to engine design and operating variables. For the engine used in this study, the exhaust emissions were found to have the following dependence on various engine variables. Hydrocarbon emission was reduced by lean operation, increased manifold pressure, retarded spark, increased exhaust temperature, increased coolant temperature, increased exhaust back pressure, and decreased compression ratio. Carbon monoxide emission was affected by air-fuel ratio and premixing the charge. Oxides of nitrogen (NO + NO2 is called NOx) emission is primarily a function of the O2 available and the peak temperature attained during the cycle. Decreased manifold pressure and retarded spark decrease NOx emission. Hydrocarbons were found to react to some extent in the exhaust port and exhaust system.
Technical Paper

The Radiant and Convective Components of Diesel Engine Heat Transfer

1963-01-01
630148
The ratio of two temperature gradients across the combustion-chamber wall in a diesel engine is used to provide a heat flow ratio showing the radiant heat transfer as a per cent of local total heat transfer. The temperature gradients were obtained with a thermocouple junction on each side of the combustion-chamber wall. The first temperature gradient was obtained by covering the thermocouple at the cylinder gas-wall interface with a thin sapphire window, while the second was obtained without the window. Results show that the time-average radiant heat transfer is of significant magnitude in a diesel engine, and is probably even more significant in heat transfer during combustion and expansion.
Technical Paper

Fuel Vaporization and Ignition Las in Diesel Combustion

1956-01-01
560063
AN analysis of phenomena occurring during the ignition delay period is presented. Vaporization of atomized fuel is shown to take place under conditions ranging between single droplet and adiabatic saturation from edge to center of the spray. Mechanisms of vaporization and combustible mixture formation are presented for both cases. Correlation of theoretical analysis with experimental data from both a combustion bomb and diesel engine is presented to establish actual conditions existing during vaporization. Estimates of physical and chemical delays for the engine and bomb are given.
Technical Paper

Behavior of High- and Low-Cetane Diesel Fuels

1937-01-01
370163
THIS paper is a sequel of the paper, “Photo-Electric Combustion Analysis,” presented at the 1936 Semi-Annual Meeting of the Society. The indicator described in that paper has been used to study combustion of 28 fuels and chemicals. A complete table of information of the materials used as fuels is included. The results obtained from over 1000 oscillograms show a different shape of ignition-lag curve versus injection advance angle than it is ordinarily thought to have. Even though the cetane values for these 28 fuels varied from 24 to 100, they all had nearly the same ignition lag when injected near the dead-center position. This minimum value is shown to be about 1/1000 sec. The fuels of higher-cetane value reach this minimum at an earlier injection angle than do those of low-cetane value. The paper shows how a high-cetane fuel can be just as rough as a low-cetane fuel if the injection timing is too early.
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