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Technical Paper

Extended Expansion Engine with Mono-Shaft Cam Mechanism for Higher Efficiency - Layout Study and Numerical Investigations of a Twin Engine

2014-11-11
2014-32-0102
The automotive industry has made great efforts in reducing fuel consumption. The efficiency of modern spark ignition (SI) engines has been increased by improving the combustion process and reducing engine losses such as friction, gas exchange and wall heat losses. Nevertheless, further efficiency improvement is indispensable for the reduction of CO2 emissions and the smart usage of available energy. In the previous years the Atkinson Cycle, realized over the crank train and/or valve train, is attracting considerable interest of several OEMs due to the high theoretical efficiency potential. In this publication a crank train-based Atkinson cycle engine is investigated. The researched engine, a 4-stroke 2 cylinder V-engine, basically consists of a special crank train linkage system and a novel Mono-Shaft valve train concept.
Journal Article

Advantages and Challenges of Lean Operation of Two-Stroke Engines for Hand-Held Power Tools

2014-11-11
2014-32-0009
One of the most significant current discussions worldwide is the anthropogenic climate change accompanying fossil fuel consumption. Sustainable development in all fields of combustion engines is required with the principal objective to enhance efficiency. This certainly concerns the field of hand-held power tools as well. Today, two-stroke SI engines equipped with a carburetor are the most widely used propulsion technology in hand-held power tools like chain saws and grass trimmers. To date, research tended to focus on two-stroke engines with rich mixture setting. In this paper the advantages and challenges of leaner and/or lean operation are discussed. Experimental investigations regarding the influence of equivalence ratio on emissions, fuel consumption and power have been performed. Accompanying 3D-CFD simulations support the experiments in order to gain insight into these complex processes. The investigations concentrate on two different mixture formation processes, i.e.
Technical Paper

Dual Fuel Compression Ignition Combustion Concept for Gasoline and Diesel

2014-04-01
2014-01-1319
Dual Fuel concepts are of interest from different perspectives: use of available fuel, independence of supplier, emission reduction and energy costs. This article presents the results of experimental work investigating the possible combination and functional effects of gasoline and diesel fuels. The test bed setup for a single cylinder research engine with a displacement of 2 liters allows gasoline to be added by external mixture formation and combustion to be started by diesel pilot injection. The goal is to reduce the engine out pollutant emissions, while keeping the efficiency at a level comparable to a modern diesel engine. The main focus is on reducing soot and nitric oxide emissions. The charge composition of gasoline is homogenous, so the combustion system can also be seen as a partial or fully homogenous combustion concept, depending on the ignition timing and the ignition delay of the diesel fuel.
Technical Paper

Engine Operating Parameter-based Heat Transfer Simulation to Predict Engine Warm-up

2014-04-01
2014-01-1103
Optimization of engine warm-up behavior has traditionally made use of experimental investigations. However, thermal engine models are a more cost-effective alternative and allow evaluation of the fuel saving potential of thermal management measures in different driving cycles. To simulate the thermal behavior of engines in general and engine warm-up in particular, knowledge of heat distribution throughout all engine components is essential. To this end, gas-side heat transfer inside the combustion chamber and in the exhaust port must be modeled as accurately as possible. Up to now, map-based models have been used to simulate heat transfer and fuel consumption; these two values are calculated as a function of engine speed and load. To extend the scope of these models, it is increasingly desirable to calculate gas-side heat transfer and fuel consumption as a function of engine operating parameters in order to evaluate different ECU databases.
Technical Paper

Multi-Component Modeling of Diesel Fuel for Injection and Combustion Simulation

2013-09-08
2013-24-0007
Accurate simulation tools are needed for rapid and cost effective engine development in order to meet ever tighter pollutant regulations for future internal combustion engines. The formation of pollutants such as soot and NOx in Diesel engines is strongly influenced by local concentration of the reactants and local temperature in the combustion chamber. Therefore it is of great importance to model accurately the physics of the injection process, combustion and emission formation. It is common practice to approximate Diesel fuel as a single compound fuel for the simulation of the injection and combustion process. This is in many cases sufficient to predict the evolution of the in-cylinder pressure and heat release in the combustion chamber. The prediction of soot and NOx formation depends however on locally component resolved quantities related to the fuel liquid and gas phase as well as local temperature.
Technical Paper

Expansion to Higher Efficiency - Investigations of the Atkinson Cycle in Small Combustion Engines

2012-10-23
2012-32-0059
Small combustion engines can be found in various applications in daily use (e.g. as propulsion of boats, scooters, motorbikes, power-tools, mobile power units, etc.) and have predominated these markets for a long time. Today some upcoming competitive technologies in the field of electrification can be observed and have already shown great technical advances. Therefore, small combustion engines have to keep their present advantages while concurrently minimizing their disadvantages in order to remain the predominant technology in the future. Whereas large combustion engines are most efficient thermal engines, small engines still suffer from significantly lower efficiencies caused by a disadvantageous surface to volume ratio. Thus, the enhancement of efficiency will play a key role in the development of future small combustion engines. One promising possibility to improve efficiency is the use of a longer expansion than compression stroke.
Journal Article

Reed Valve CFD Simulation of a 2-Stroke Engine Using a 2D Model Including the Complete Engine Geometry

2010-09-28
2010-32-0015
CFD has been widely used to predict the flow behavior inside 2-stroke engines over the past twenty years. Usually a mass flow profile or a simple 0D model is used for the inlet boundary condition, which replaces the complete intake geometry, such as reed valve, throttle, and air box geometries. For a CFD simulation which takes into account the exact reed valve geometry, a simulation of all above mentioned domains is required, as these domains are coupled together and thus interact. As the high speed of the engine affects the opening dynamic and closure of the reed valve, the transient data from the crank case volume and the section upstream the reed valve have an important influence on the reed petal dynamic and therewith on the sucked fresh air mass of the engine. This paper covers a methodology for the transient CFD simulation of the reed petals of a 2-stroke engine by using a 2D model.
Technical Paper

Exhaust System Simulation of a 2-Cylinder 2-Stroke Engine Including Heat Transfer Effects

2010-09-28
2010-32-0035
The exhaust system design has an important influence on the charge mass and the composition of the charge inside the cylinder, due to its gas dynamic behavior. Therefore the exhaust system determines the characteristics of the indicated mean effective pressure as well. The knowledge of the heat transfer and the post-combustion process of fuel losses inside the exhaust system are important for the thermodynamic analysis of the working process. However, the simulation of the heat transfer over the exhaust pipe wall is time consuming, due to the demand for a transient simulation of many revolutions until a cyclic steady condition is reached. Therefore, the exhaust pipe wall temperature is set to constant in the conventional CFD simulation of 2-stroke engines. This paper covers the discussion of a simulation strategy for the exhaust system of a 2-cylinder 2-stroke engine until cyclic steady condition including the heat transfer over the exhaust pipe wall.
Technical Paper

Basic Investigations on the Prediction of Spray-Wall and Spray-Fluid Interaction for a GDI Combustion Process

2010-09-28
2010-32-0030
This publication covers investigations on different 3D CFD models for the description of the spray wall and droplet-fluid interaction and the influence of these models on the mixture formation calculation results. Basic experimental investigations in a spray chamber and a flow tunnel as well as the corresponding 3D CFD simulation were conducted in order to clarify the prediction quality of the physical phenomena of spray-wall and spray-fluid interaction by the simulation. Influencing parameters such as the piston top temperature, piston bowl geometry, soot deposits on the piston top as well as flow velocity are investigated. This paper provides a direct link between the underlying simulation models of the mixture formation and actual real world combustion system development processes - underlining the importance of a close interaction of the model calibration and the development process.
Technical Paper

Investigations on Low Pressure Gasoline Direct Injection for a Standard GDI Combustion System

2010-09-28
2010-32-0094
In the course of the last few years a continuous increase of the injection pressure level of gasoline direct injection systems appeared. Today's systems use an injection pressure up to 200bar and the trend shows a further increase for the future. Although several benefits go along with the increased injection pressure, the disadvantages such as higher system costs and higher energy demand lead to the question of the lowest acceptable injection pressure level for low cost GDI combustion systems. Lowering injection pressure and costs could enable the technological upgrading from MPFI to GDI in smaller engine segments, which would lead to a reduction of CO2 emission. This publication covers the investigation of a low pressure GDI system (LPDI) with focus on small and low cost GDI engines. The influence of the injection pressure on the fuel consumption and emission behavior was investigated using a 1.4l series production engine.
Technical Paper

Potential of Synergies in a Vehicle for Variable Mixtures of CNG and Hydrogen

2009-04-20
2009-01-1420
Synergies in infrastructure and customer acceptance can be achieved by running internal combustion engines on mixtures of hydrogen and natural gas. Alongside the bridging effect between natural gas and hydrogen, such mixing offers advantages in terms of reduced emissions and improvements to the combustion process. The wide ignition limits and high flame speed of hydrogen have as positive an impact on the combustion of H2NG mixture as does the higher energy density of natural gas on range. A bi-fuel gasoline-natural gas vehicle was adapted to operation with gasoline, natural gas, hydrogen and any H2NG mixtures. For that purpose, the intake manifold was replaced by an aluminum construction, the injectors were replaced and the ECU had to be adjusted. Essentially quality-controlled hydrogen operation was possible throughout the engine map.
Journal Article

New and Innovative Combustion Systems for the H2-ICE: Compression Ignition and Combined Processes

2009-04-20
2009-01-1421
Hydrogen nowadays is considered one promising energy carrier for future mobility scenarios. Its application as a fuel in ICEs greatly benefits from Direct Injection (DI) strategies, which help to reduce the disadvantages of PFI systems such as air displacement effects, knocking, backfiring and low power density. In SI-engines one appropriate way to increase efficiency is the reduction of wall heat losses by jet- and/or wall-guided mixture formation systems. In theory, Compression Ignition (CI) systems employing a diffusion type of combustion allow for a significant raise in compression ratio and, thus, are likely to excel the SI concept in terms of efficiency. The following paper deals with results obtained from investigations on H2 Compression-Ignition (H2-CI) combustion systems by employing both thermodynamic research engines and 3D CFD simulation.
Technical Paper

Investigation of the Thermal Vehicle Brake Behavior During the Vehicle's Development Phase by Co-Simulation

2007-10-07
2007-01-3935
The mathematical thermal design of the vehicle brakes will lead to success if all influence parameters such as friction (fading effect), car geometry and inertia, brake amplifier, tire, convective heat flow, heat conductance and heat radiation are taken into consideration. In addition to a lot of design criteria, the thermal stability of the vehicle brake is becoming more and more important because of permanently increasing engine powers and weight of the vehicles. This requires both stable friction behavior in the contact zone between brake lining and brake disk and a sufficient transfer of the friction energy by means of convective heat flow. In order to accomplish these two tasks, considerable expense on a brake test bed and innumerable brake trials are necessary. It must be guarantied at the end of the brake design process that the vehicle reaches the required braking distance and the thermal stability of the brake, e.g. after several freeway braking sequences.
Technical Paper

H2-Direct Injection – A Highly Promising Combustion Concept

2005-04-11
2005-01-0108
Hydrogen is frequently cited as a future energy carrier. Hydrogen allows a further optimization of internal combustion engines, especially with direct injection. In order to assess various concepts, detailed thermodynamic analyses were carried out. Effects, which can be neglected with conventional fuels (e.g. losses due to injection during compression stroke) are considered. These basics as well as several results from test bed investigations are described within this article. Wall heat losses were found to have a major influence on overall efficiency and are thus investigated in detail, based on local surface temperature measurement. Finally, concepts that allow an increase in engine efficiency and lowest NOx emissions are demonstrated.
Technical Paper

Crankcase Supercharged Four Stroke Engine with Oil Separating System

2004-01-01
2004-01-2105
An efficient and economic method to increase the performance of four stroke engines can be accomplished by utilizing the crankcase supercharging method. The lubrication of the movable parts in the crankcase by mixing the intake air with lubricant leads to a high oil consumption and disadvantages in the emission characteristics. This paper describes parts of a research project with the goal to develop a supercharged four–stroke engine with a closed loop lubrication system for the crank train and the cylinder head. The thermodynamic layout and the development of an oil separating system have been carried out with the help of simulation tools and development work on a flow test bench.
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