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Technical Paper

Biodiesel Later-Phased Low Temperature Combustion Ignition and Burn Rate Behavior on Engine Torque

2012-04-16
2012-01-1305
Finding a replacement for fossil fuels is critical for the future of automotive transportation. The compression ignition (CI) engine is an important aspect of everyday life by means of transportation and shipping of materials. Biodiesel is a viable augmentation for conventional diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Biodiesel-fuelled diesel engines produce less particulate matter (PM) relative to conventional diesel and biodiesel has the ability to be a carbon dioxide (CO₂) neutral fuel, which may come under government regulation as a greenhouse gas. Although biodiesel is a viable diesel replacement and has certain emissions benefits, it typically also has a known characteristic of higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions relative to petroleum diesel. Advanced modes of combustion such as low temperature combustion (LTC) have attained much attention due to ever-increasing emission standards, and could also help reduce NOx in biodiesel.
Journal Article

Low Temperature Heat Release of Palm and Soy Biodiesel in Late Injection Low Temperature Combustion

2014-04-01
2014-01-1381
The first stage of ignition in saturated hydrocarbon fuels is characterized as low temperature heat release (LTHR) or cool flame combustion. LTHR takes place as a series of isomerization reactions at temperatures from 600K to 900K, and is often detectable in HCCI, rapid compression machines, and early injection low temperature combustion (LTC). The experimental investigation presented attempts to determine the behavior of LTHR in late injection low temperature combustion in a medium duty diesel as fuel varies and the influence of such behavior on LTC torque and emissions.
Journal Article

Diesel EGR Cooler Fouling

2008-10-06
2008-01-2475
The buildup of deposits in EGR coolers causes significant degradation in heat transfer performance, often on the order of 20-30%. Deposits also increase pressure drop across coolers and thus may degrade engine efficiency under some operating conditions. It is unlikely that EGR cooler deposits can be prevented from forming when soot and HC are present. The presence of cooled surfaces will cause thermophoretic soot deposition and condensation of HC and acids. While this can be affected by engine calibration, it probably cannot be eliminated as long as cooled EGR is required for emission control. It is generally felt that “dry fluffy” soot is less likely to cause major fouling than “heavy wet” soot. An oxidation catalyst in the EGR line can remove HC and has been shown to reduce fouling in some applications. The combination of an oxidation catalyst and a wall-flow filter largely eliminates fouling. Various EGR cooler designs affect details of deposit formation.
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