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Cost Versus Benefits of Engine Monitoring Systems

2019-10-01
WIP
AIR4176B
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information that would be useful to potential users/operators and decision makers for evaluating and quantifying the benefits of an Engine Monitoring Systems (EMS) versus its cost of implementation. This document presents excerpts from reports developed to analyze "actual aircraft cost/benefits results". These are presented as follows: a. First, to outline the benefits and cost elements pertaining to EMS that may be used in performing a cost versus benefits analysis. b. Second, to present considerations for use in conducting the analysis. c. Third, to provide examples of analyses and results as they relate to the user/operator and decision-maker community. The document encompasses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft and distinguishes between civilian and military considerations.
Standard

Cost Versus Benefits of Engine Monitoring Systems

1995-10-01
HISTORICAL
AIR4176
The purpose of this SAE Aerospace Information Report (AIR) is to provide information that would be useful to potential users/operators and decision makers for evaluating and quantifying the benefits of an Engine Monitoring Systems (EMS) versus its cost of implementation. This document presents excerpts from reports developed to analyze “actual aircraft cost/benefits results”. These are presented as follows: a First, to outline the benefits and cost elements pertaining to EMS that may be used in performing a cost versus benefits analysis. b Second, to present considerations for use in conducting the analysis. c Third, to provide examples of analyses and results as they relate to the user/operator and decision-maker community. The document encompasses helicopters and fixed wing aircraft and distinguishes between civilian and military considerations.
Standard

Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine Health Management System Development and Integration Guide

2016-03-05
CURRENT
ARP5120
ARP5120 provides recommended best practices, procedures, and technology to guide the physical and functional design, development, integration, verification, and validation of highly reliable Engine Health Management (EHM) systems for aircraft engines and Auxiliary Power Units (APUs). This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) also serves as a concise reference of considerations, approaches, activities, and requirements for producing the end-to-end engine health management system comprised of both on and off-board subsystems for the sensing, acquisition, analysis, detection, and data handling functions for EHM. These functions may also be used to effect continued operation or return to service decisions when demonstrated as compliant with the applicable airworthiness requirements defined by the responsible Aviation Authority. Where practical, this document delineates between military and commercial practices.
Standard

A Guide to APU Health Management

2006-03-24
HISTORICAL
AIR5317
The SAE Guide to APU health management establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management program at any aircraft or APU operator, such as an airline, an OEM, an equipment supplier, or a military transport unit. This guide identifies the best practices for using an APU health management program to improve dispatch reliability and to satisfy Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability requirements.
Standard

A Guide to APU Health Management

2018-04-09
CURRENT
AIR5317A
AIR5317 establishes the foundation for developing a successful APU health management capability for any commercial or military operator, flying fixed wing aircraft or rotorcraft. This AIR provides guidance for demonstrating business value through improved dispatch reliability, fewer service interruptions, and lower maintenance costs and for satisfying Extended Operations (ETOPS) availability and compliance requirements.
Standard

Lessons Learned from Developing, Implementing, and Operating a Health Management System for Propulsion and Drive Train Systems

2011-01-03
CURRENT
AIR1871C
SAE Aerospace Information Report AIR1871 provides valuable insight into lessons learned in the development, implementation, and operation of various health monitoring systems for propulsion engines and drive train systems. This document provides an overview of the lessons learned for ground-based systems, oil debris monitoring systems, lubrication systems, and Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS) for military and commercial programs. For each case study, this document presents a brief technical description, the design requirements, accomplishments, lessons learned, and future recommendations. The lessons learned presented in this document represent a fragment of the knowledge gained through experience when developing and implementing a propulsion health management system. Previous versions of this document contain additional lessons learned during the 1980’s and 1990’s that may be of additional value to the reader.
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