Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Journal Article

Sodium Contamination of Diesel Fuel, its Interaction with Fuel Additives and the Resultant Effects on Filter Plugging and Injector Fouling

2013-10-14
2013-01-2687
Diesel fuel distilled from crude oil should contain no greater than trace amounts of sodium. However, fuel specifications do not include sodium; there is a limit of five parts per million for the amount of sodium plus potassium in fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) used as biodiesel. Sodium compounds are often used as the catalyst for the esterification process for producing FAME and sodium hydroxide is now commonly used in the refining process to produce ultra-low sulphur diesel (ULSD) fuel from crude oil. Good housekeeping should ensure that sodium is not present in the finished fuel. A finished fuel should not only be free of sodium but should also contain a diesel fuel additive package to ensures the fuel meets the quality standards introduced to provide reliable operation, along with the longevity of the fuel supply infrastructure and the diesel engines that ultimately burn this fuel.
Technical Paper

Insights into Deposit Formation in High Pressure Diesel Fuel Injection Equipment

2010-10-25
2010-01-2243
The need to meet the US 2007 emissions legislation has necessitated a change in Diesel engine technology, particularly to the fuel injection equipment (FIE). At the same time as these engine technology changes, legislation has dictated a reduction in fuel sulphur levels and there has also been increased use of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) or biodiesel as a fuel blending component. The combination of changes to the engine and the fuel has apparently led to a sharp rise in the number of reports of field problems resulting from deposits within the FIE. The problem is usually manifested as a significant loss of power or the engine failing to start. These symptoms are often due to deposits to be found within the fuel injectors or to severe fouling of the fuel filter. The characteristics of the deposits found within different parts of the fuel system can be noticeably different.
Technical Paper

A Cost Effective Solution to Reduce Particulate Emissions

2003-01-18
2003-26-0006
Growing concern over the health effects of airborne particles and a desire to reduce the associated cost has resulted in legislation, regulations and other measures, in the industrialised world to severely restrict particulate emissions from diesel-fuelled automotive transport. Developing countries are also introducing initiatives to try and reduce emissions, an example is the legislation in India to replace diesel engines with gas fuelled engines in some major conurbations. Such measures are expensive, both in terms of replacing the engines of the vehicles and of implementing the required infrastructure. There is still also debate over whether such measures reduce the number of ultra-fine particulates. A well-proven alternative is to fit diesel engines with Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs), either as original equipment or as a retrofit system. Regenerating DPFs has in the past been an obstacle to their widespread application.
Technical Paper

Retrofitting of Diesel Particulate Filters - Particulate Matter and Nitrogen Dioxide

2003-05-19
2003-01-1883
A diesel particulate filter (DPF) is a crucial weapon in the fight to control the downsides traditionally associated with diesel engined vehicles. The DPF not only produces the benefits required from an environmental standpoint but also has the consumer benefit of eliminating the visible black smoke associated with diesel engines. Thus DPFs have now become a reality, both for series production vehicles and as a retrofit application. Inevitably there are a number of alternative types of DPF and alternative techniques are used for ensuring they continue to function in an acceptable manner. Due to the complexity of the diesel combustion process and the emissions produced it is only to be expected that a device intended primarily to control one parameter would have some effect on other parameters. This paper looks at some different DPF technologies and how they effect emissions, with the emphasis on particulate emissions and the speciation of oxides of nitrogen.
Technical Paper

Diesel Particulate Filters and Fuel Borne Catalysts as a Viable Solution to Reduced Airborne Particulate

2001-11-01
2001-28-0041
There is mounting worldwide concern over the health effects of airborne ultra-fine particles. Of greatest concern are the risks due to the cancer-inducing properties of these particles and the aggravation of existing respiratory diseases by the ultra-fine (i.e. <2.5 micron) fraction. This disquiet has already resulted in legislation, regulations and other measures, either mandated or proposed, in the industrialised world to severely restrict particulate emissions from diesel-fuelled automotive transport. Emissions of particles from both new and existing vehicles have been addressed. With the rapid growth anticipated in some developing countries they to will need to address this problem. This paper outlines some alternative solutions to the problem, ranging from alternative power sources, alternative fuels, alternative engine technologies and after-treatment strategies. It also outlines what is required to implement these different solutions.
Technical Paper

A Novel Fuel Borne Catalyst Dosing System for Use with a Diesel Particulate Filter

2003-03-03
2003-01-0382
A novel dosing system for fuel borne catalyst (FBC), used to assist regeneration with a diesel particulate filter (DPF), has been developed. The system was designed for on-board vehicle use to overcome problems encountered with batch dosing systems. Important design features were simplicity, to minimise system cost, and the use of in-line dosing rather than batch dosing linked to tank refuelling. The paper describes the development of the dosing system which continuously doses FBC into the fuel line feeding the engine injection pump. The theoretical considerations behind the concept are explored, together with the realities imposed by fuelling regimes in which a variable proportion of the fuel flowing through the injection pump is passed back to the fuel tank. Two types of system are considered, ie where 1) FBC is added to the fuel in direct proportion to the flow rate of fuel and 2) FBC is added at a constant time-based rate.
Technical Paper

Demonstration of the Benefits of DPF/FBC Systems on London Black Cabs

2003-03-03
2003-01-0375
Future emissions limits are pushing vehicle manufacturers towards the fitting of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPFs) as original equipment. However due to the replacement rate of the vehicle fleet, there is a delay before the full benefit of these measures are fully realised. To overcome this problem, in areas with a particular problem such as heavily congested city centres, retrospective legislation has been, and may be introduced. Legislation mandating the retrofitting of DPFs obviously has an immediate effect on particulate emissions. In some countries including the UK there are also fiscal incentives to fit DPFs. Due to its duty cycle the London taxi or Black Cab is one of the more challenging areas of application for the DPF. Previous work has shown that the use of a fuel borne catalyst (FBC) can extend the operating range of DPF systems providing the possibility of a viable system for such applications.
Technical Paper

Particulates Reduction in Diesel Engines Through the Combination of a Particulate Filter and Fuel Additive

1998-10-19
982654
Exhaust emissions legislation for diesel engines generally limits only the mass of emitted particulate matter. This limitation reflects the concerns and measurement technology at the time the legislation was drafted. However, evolving diesel particulate filter (DPF) systems offer the potential for reductions in the mass and more importantly, the number of particles emitted from diesel exhausts. Particulate filters require frequent cleaning or regeneration of accumulated soot, if the engine is to continue to operate satisfactorily. Exothermic reactions during regeneration can lead to severe thermal gradients in the filter system resulting in damage. Fuel additives have been evaluated to show significant reductions in light off temperature which allow frequent small regeneration events to occur, under mild operating conditions.
Technical Paper

Novel Additive for Particulate Trap Regeneration

1995-10-01
952355
One of the most promising ways to insure the periodic regeneration of a particulate trap, consists of additising the fuel with organo-metallic compounds. The present paper deals with a novel alkali product, able to promote natural regenerations, for exhaust temperatures as low as 200 °C, and treatment rates as low as 5 ppm metal. Tests have been carried out on a soot reactor and on an engine bench, with various trap locations in the exhaust, showing that the regeneration occurrence depends on temperature, soot mass loaded inside the porous structure and engine conditions. A complete trap cleaning still needs gas temperatures up to 400 °C, which can be encountered for high load conditions of the engine.
Journal Article

Possible Mechanism for Poor Diesel Fuel Lubricity in the Field

2012-04-16
2012-01-0867
Traditionally, diesel fuel injection equipment (FIE) has frequently relied on the diesel fuel to lubricate the moving parts. When ultra low sulphur diesel fuel was first introduced into some European markets in the early 1980's it rapidly became apparent that the process of removing the sulphur also removed other components that had bestowed the lubricating properties of the diesel fuel. Diesel fuel pump failures became prevalent. The fuel additive industry responded quickly and diesel fuel lubricity additives were introduced to the market. The fuel, additive and FIE industries expended much time and effort to develop test methods and standards to try and ensure this problem was not repeated. Despite this, there have recently been reports of fuel reaching the end user with lubricating performance below the accepted standards.
Technical Paper

An Investigation Into Transient Diesel Spray Development Using High Speed Imaging In A Novel Optical Pressure Chamber

2011-08-30
2011-01-1836
The fuel economy and emissions performance of a Diesel engine is strongly influenced by the fuel injection process. This paper presents early results of an experimental investigation into diesel spray development carried out in a novel in-house developed optical pressure chamber capable of operating at pressure up to 50 bar and temperatures up to 900 K. The spatial evolution of a diesel spray tends to experience many transitory macroscopic phenomena that directly influence the mixing process. These phenomena are not considered highly reproducible and are extremely short lived, hence recording and understanding these transient effects is difficult. In this study, high-speed backlight-illuminated imaging has been employed in order to capture the transient dynamics of a short signal duration diesel spray injected into incremental back pressures and temperatures reaching a maximum of 10 bar and 473 K respectively.
X