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Technical Paper

THE DEMANDS OF A VICTORIOUS AUTOMOTIVE NATION

1919-01-01
190066
The nineteen months preceding Nov. 11, 1918, constituted the most far-reaching educational period in the history of the United States. The war being over, both opportunity and danger are ahead. Automotive manufacturers, engineers and educators have large responsibilities in post-war industrial rehabilitation. A frank discussion of several prime demands is presented. After outlining the achievements of the war period, the lessons thereof are enumerated, special emphasis being placed upon cooperation and teamwork, and the automotive manufacturers urged to give consideration to the permanent and stable establishment of their business and product. Attention is called to the part universities can and should take in practical service, in conducting automotive engineering courses, giving public instruction and furthering good roads development and highways transport.
Technical Paper

BUILDING SUBMARINE CHASERS BY STANDARDIZED METHODS

1917-01-01
170030
The author outlines the history of the 550 submarine chasers built for the British Government between April, 1915, and November, 1916, and attributes the success of the undertaking largely to scientific standardization. He cites some of the early difficulties in obtaining supplies and tells how they were met, and mentions how and why the fabrication was carried out in this country and the assembly made in Canada. The paper concludes with citation of the principal dimensions of the boats, power, speed and cruising radius. In the course of the discussion the author refers further to the power plant and mentions some of the war-time duties of this type of craft.
Technical Paper

BURNING KEROSENE IN TRACTOR ENGINES

1917-01-01
170031
The author states as his object a review of what has been done and what must be done to make tractors successful in operating on low-grade fuels, especially kerosene. He takes up in order the four principal methods in common use of applying heat to vaporize kerosene, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages of each method and of its modifications. The author then cites various experiments with different types of carbureters in burning kerosene, drawing at length upon his own experience in this connection. He cites difficulties with gas distribution, manifold condensation, pistons and spark-plugs and points out that carbureter design is inseparable from considerations of tractor engine and manifold design. That better progress has not been made in the past in developing kerosene-burning tractor engines is stated to be largely owing to the fact that there has not been sufficient cooperation between engine and carbureter manufacturers.
Technical Paper

METROPOLITAN SECTION PAPERS TREATMENT OF HYDROCARBON FUELS

1917-01-01
170046
The author states that the objects of the paper are to define and trace the development of the various processes of carburetion, and to offer such suggestions along these lines as may assist the investigator in developing motorboats, automobiles and self-contained unit motor cars for railway purposes. The surface carburetor is mentioned chiefly as of historic interest. In considering the jet carbureter the author discusses the proportion of gas desired, the effect of the varying inertia of the air and the liquid gasoline and the breaking up of the combustible needed. Following sections review the devices for using kerosene, such as gasoline jet carbureters to which heat is applied, devices of the fixed gas type, the introduction of combustible directly into the cylinder, forcing combustible directly upon a hot surface in the cylinder and devices which raise the combustible to the boiling point.
Technical Paper

RECENT AEROPLANE-ENGINE DEVELOPMENTS

1916-01-01
160025
The author gives a brief review of developments during the past year in the construction of aeroplanes, particularly as affected by the European War. He takes as an example the Renault twelve-cylinder engine, citing the respects in which the present differs from previous models. Such factors as the changes in cooling systems, method of drive, valve construction and starting devices are considered. The requirements of aeroplane engines, such as constant service, high speeds (of aeroplanes) and stream-line form of engines and radiators, are outlined. Propeller requirements are dealt with at length, curves being given by which the efficiency and diameter of the propeller can be obtained. In conclusion a number of different engine installations are illustrated and compared.
Technical Paper

LARGE SINGLE VERSUS DUAL SOLID TIRES FOR REAR TRUCK WHEELS

1916-01-01
160030
This paper is mainly an argument in favor of the use of large, single rear wheel truck tires instead of smaller dual tires. Although the practice of using large singles is comparatively new, the author gives the results of experience and research to show the advantages of the newer method of rear tire equipment. In developing his arguments in favor of single tires, the author goes into the history of dual tire application to show why it was necessary to use two tires in the earlier days of truck operation. As the necessity for increased carrying-capacity grew, tire manufacturers found the then existing single tire equipment inadequate, and they set about to develop suitable equipment to meet the new condition, the result being dual practice. The method of attaching the earlier dual tires is shown to have been poor, resulting in circumferential creeping of the whole tire to a much greater extent as the width of the dual equipment increased.
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