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Technical Paper

Modern Naval Aircraft

1927-01-01
270072
MORE and more is being demanded of Navy airplanes beyond the requirements of commercial planes. Catapulting and deck landings are required of some planes and corrosion must be guarded against. Bombers and fighting planes each have their special requirements, and planes must be able to land safely on either land or water. The most important developments in aerodynamics now going on are to restrict the travel of the center of pressure of the wings as the angle of attack changes; but widespread adoption of slotted wings and other results of experimental development may be expected. Metal is being used more than formerly in structural work but there are as yet no all-metal service-types in the Navy. Chrome-molybdenum steel is replacing mild carbon-steel in the tubular frames of fuselages, and there is a tendency to seek substitutes for welded joints. Duralumin is slowly replacing steel where welding is not required, but its adoption is retarded because of corrosion.
Technical Paper

Internal Wheel-Brakes for High-Speed Heavy Vehicles

1927-01-01
270052
The paper deals primarily with internal wheel-brakes for trucks and motorcoaches, but passenger-car brakes with similar characteristics are considered possible. A simple two-shoe internal-expanding type developed mainly by empirical methods is found to be the most practical solution in spite of relatively low circumferential contact. Self-energization is necessary to reduce driver effort with normal pedal-travel. The factors controlling self-energization are explained in detail, and the effect of difference in the coefficient of friction of brake-linings is noted. Distortion of brake-drum and brake-shoes must be limited by a drum of heavy section and by extremely rigid shoes. Rotation of cam with respect to self-energizing shoe should tend to deflect the toe of shoe away from brake-drum surface. A floating cam is necessary to balance unequal wear on the brake-shoes and assure adequate braking with normal pedal-pressure.
Technical Paper

PROGRESS IN AIRCRAFT-ENGINE DESIGN

1926-01-01
260063
The marked advance that has been made in the last 10 years in constructional details and in performance of airplane engines and in airplane performance is reviewed, beginning with the year 1916 when the Curtiss OX-5 eight-cylinder water-cooled engine was brought to its final stage of development. The author describes briefly each type of engine produced successively by the company he represents and tells of the changes that were made to improve the performance. From the 8-cylinder V-type the constructors changed to the 6 and 12-cylinder water-cooled type and are now developing a 9-cylinder air-cooled radial engine that was built in 1925. An important field of usefulness is foreseen for the air-cooled engine.
Technical Paper

ANTI-FREEZE SOLUTIONS AND COMPOUNDS

1926-01-01
260054
The effectiveness and the advantages and disadvantages of various substances and compounds that are used or offered in the market for use in the radiators of automotive vehicles as anti-freeze materials are discussed. These include alcohols, glycerine, salts, oils, sugars, and glycols. Properties affecting the suitability of a material or compound, or solutions of them with water to afford protection against freezing at atmospheric temperatures that are likely to be encountered are their heat capacity, freezing-point, boiling-point, specific gravity, viscosity, volatility, solubility, tendency to decompose at the boiling-point, inflammability, corrosive action upon metals, tendency to attack rubber, general availability, and price. The freezing-points of solutions of different materials vary widely at the same concentrations, or proportions to water, and also with variation of their concentration.
Technical Paper

GEAR-STEELS AND THE PRODUCTION OF AUTOMOBILE GEARS

1926-01-01
260056
Stating that the production of satisfactory gears is one of the most serious problems confronting the automobile builder, the authors give an outline of the practice of producing gears that is used by the company they represent and describe a new method for cutting the rear-axle drive-pinion by using two machines, each machine cutting one side of the teeth. Explanations are given of the various steps in the process and the reasons for stating that this method is not only cheaper but produces gears of higher quality. Numerous suggestions are made for improving gears and axles, and the claim is made that it is doubtful if the spiral-bevel gear has had a fair chance because axles usually have not been designed so that the main consideration was the requirements of the gears.
Technical Paper

THE SUITABILITY OF AUTOMOTIVE WORM-GEARING1

1926-01-01
260043
Subsequent to a brief review of the development of the worm-gear drive for motor-trucks and the gear-ratios considered most desirable, the author discusses comparatively the worm-gear and the spiral-bevel gear with regard to their application for specific service, as well as with regard to their cost and length of life. It is brought out that the worm-gear is, after all, very similar in action to any sliding, or journal, bearing. A certain amount of involute rolling-action takes place in the action of the gearing, the magnitude of which increases with the gear-ratio; but the primary action is one of sliding of the worm-threads across the gear-teeth. Simple as this fact is, the prejudice fostered by many people against worm-gears can be traced to lack of appreciation of it. Due to the nature of the surfaces in contact, the best obtainable bearing takes the form of a narrow strip running across the gear-tooth, and the bearing pressures obtained are high.
Technical Paper

WORM-GEARS AND WORM-GEARED AXLES1

1926-01-01
260044
After a brief historical review of the development of worm-gears, the author deals with worms and worm-wheels in detail, presenting the subjects of proper choice of materials, tooth-shapes, worm-gear efficiency, the stresses imposed on worm-gearing and worm-gear axles. Usually, he says, the worm is made of case-hardened steel of S.A.E. No. 1020 grade; however, when the worm-diameter is smaller and the stresses are greater, nickel-steels such as S.A.E. Nos. 2315 and 2320 grades are utilized. The worm should be properly heat-treated and carbonized to produce a glass-hard surface. Grinding of the worm-thread is necessary to remove distortions. Bronze is the only material of which the author knows that will enable the worm-wheel to withstand the high stresses imposed by motor-vehicle axles, and three typical bronze alloys are in common use.
Technical Paper

ACTION, APPLICATION AND CONSTRUCTION OF UNIVERSAL-JOINTS

1926-01-01
260040
Use of the universal-joint for transmitting power mechanically through an angle has been traced back to about 300 years before Cardan's period and about 400 years before a patent on a universal-joint was granted to Robert Hooke in 1664. The first reference to use of this type of joint is found in a manuscript by Wilars de Honecort, a thirteenth-century architect. A peculiarity of the universal-joint is that, as the two shafts which it unites are rotated when at an angle to each other, it imparts to the driven shaft a non-uniform rotational velocity which becomes very erratic as the angle between the shafts approaches 90 deg. This action has been analyzed by many writers by different methods, two such analyses being cited by the author of the present paper.
Technical Paper

VOLATILITY TESTS FOR AUTOMOBILE FUELS1

1926-01-01
260032
Elementary theories regarding the evaporation characteristics of pure substances and mixed liquids are discussed briefly and the difficulties likely to be encountered in attempts to calculate the volatilities of motor fuels from data relating to pure substances or in the extrapolation of volatility data corresponding to the atmospheric boiling-range of the fuel to the range of temperatures encountered in utilization of the fuel are pointed out. A brief review of previous methods of arriving at fuel volatility is also presented. Volatility, as applied to motor fuels, is defined as being measured by the percentage of a given quantity of the fuel which can be evaporated under equilibrium conditions into a specified volume. The weight of air under known pressures is taken as a convenient measure of the volume. The new method described is an equilibrium distillation of the fuel in the presence of a known weight of air.
Technical Paper

CAUSES OF WEAR AND CORROSION IN ENGINES

1926-01-01
260028
The paper represents a study of analyses obtained from 656 samples of contaminated crankcase-oil and states the results of cooperative research, the sponsors being the Society, the American Petroleum Institute, the National Automobile Chamber of Commerce, and the Bureau of Standards. Reliable information was sought regarding existent conditions throughout the Country and, since analyses of a large number of samples were a requisite, arrangements were made with service stations located at points representative of the Country's atmospheric and geographical conditions for the collection of samples of contaminated crankcase-oil, a uniform procedure calculated to assure accuracy of the results being enjoined. Each participating service station was requested to select 10 cars, all of the same make, to drain the oil and to refill with new oil.
Technical Paper

METALCLAD RIGID AIRSHIP DEVELOPMENT1

1926-01-01
260026
Several years ago some of the most prominent leaders in automotive industries cooperated to form a purely engineering group that had as its primary purpose developing a type of rigid-airship construction in which the public would have confidence. It was conceived that such an airship should be (1) Fireproof (2) Weatherproof (3) Durable and permanent in structure (4) Navigable in practically all kinds of weather (5) Economical in the use of buoyant gas and ballast To meet all of these requirements it was decided, after mature consideration, that a substantially all-metal construction was imperative.
Technical Paper

EYE-BOLT STRESSES AS DETERMINED BY PHOTOELASTIC TEST

1925-01-01
250068
Principal stresses in one type of eye-bolt have been determined in the laboratory of photoelasticity at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology by the photoelastic method. In the test, an eye-bolt, designed in accordance with a method suggested for circular eyes in a course in machine design by the Institute, was made of celluloid 0.25 in. thick, 1 in. wide on either side of the eye, with a 1.405-in. diameter of eye, and a 1.333-in. width of shank. Steel loading-plates were pinned to the broadened end of the shank and a load of 100 lb. was suspended from the bolt, which gave a mean stress of 300 lb. per sq. in. in the shank. Plain polarized light was passed through the celluloid model and the isoclinic lines, or lines of equal inclination of principal stress, were observed and recorded. Two families of lines of principal stress, designated as P and Q stresses, were determined graphically from these isoclinic lines.
Technical Paper

SOME ASPECTS OF AIRPLANE INSPECTION

1925-01-01
250069
Following a description of airplane structure, the author discusses structural requirements and outlines the main features of properly coordinating the engineering and the manufacturing activities. He says that each of the three subdivisions of airplane design has its own series of calculations, these being related to predictions of performance before the machine is built, to stability determinations and to the design of a self-contained structure of sufficient strength to withstand any stresses developed in flight or in landing. He states also that no inspection is worth the name or the money spent on it that does not include constructive work and a knowledge at all times that the intentions of the designers are being carried out in detail so that the safety of the craft is assured. Materials used in aircraft should be light and easily workable and should possess the desired physical and chemical properties; they must have the specified cross-section and be free from defects.
Technical Paper

INSPECTION METHODS

1925-01-01
250058
With the passing of the apprenticeship system and the introduction of the present method of employing unskilled labor on a piecework basis for assembling, careful inspection has become a necessity. Under these conditions, the only way in which the product can be held to the required standards is to make the component parts fit accurately. If the inspection is adequate, parts can be held to closer limits and cheaper labor can be used in the assembling process. Believing that no reason can exist for failure to maintain standards of accuracy if the ratio of the number of men engaged in production to one inspector does not exceed 15 to 1, the officials of the Buick Company have worked out a system, similar in many respects to a budget, in which a certain ratio of production hours to inspection hours is allowed in each plant, the number depending upon the nature of the work and varying from about 10 to 1 in the engine plant to about 34 to 1 in the gray-iron foundry.
Technical Paper

COORDINATING GEAR DESIGN AND PRODUCTION METHODS1

1925-01-01
250057
Periodically recurring problems of gear noise and wear which seem to arise from no specific cause frequently affect the manufacturing side of the automotive industry and especially the gear-manufacturers. While much has been written and discussed about the mathematics and geometry of gears, which should overcome all of these problems, the trouble unfortunately still persists. The paper outlines the experience of the organization with which the author is connected in solving a rather difficult problem that offered an opportunity for a more thorough analysis than did its predecessors. Laboratory and dynamometer analyses of the product showed that it compared favorably with the output, of other factories.
Technical Paper

THE TESTING OF SHEET STEEL

1925-01-01
250064
Will sheet steel that is to be used in the manufacture of automobile parts form the parts for which it is intended without breaking, buckling or pulling coarse at the sharp corners is a question, the answer to which is sought through a series of tests applied to samples of the material by the Packard Motor Car Co. Three sheets are selected from different parts of every 1000 sheets received. After sections have been removed from the ends of these sample sheets, four test pieces are taken from each sheet at specified locations and these last samples are subjected to Erichsen, Rockwell and tensile-strength tests, each of which is discussed.
Technical Paper

DIE-CASTINGS MADE OF NON-FERROUS METALS1

1925-01-01
250065
Subsequent to an historical review of die-casting, briefly stated, the author covers the subject of present die-casting practices comprehensively and conveys a large amount of specific information. Because many different methods of producing castings exist outside the sand-casting realm, he says that some confusion prevails as to the exact definition of the term “die-casting.” Such castings may be produced in metallic or in non-metallic long-life molds, or in combination with destructible cores. They may be filled by gravity and known as “permanent-mold castings”; or by centrifugal force and known as “centrifugal castings”; or by filling the mold by gravity and, after the outer skin has become chilled, pouring out the excess metal. The last named are known as “slush castings.” On the other hand, a die-casting may be defined as a casting formed in a metallic mold or die, from metal subjected to mechanical or gaseous pressure while in the molten state.
Technical Paper

HISTORY OF AUTOMOTIVE-CLUTCH DEVELOPMENT

1925-01-01
250041
Reviewing briefly the history of the automotive clutch and summarizing the most interesting achievements in clutch design during recent years, the author discusses friction facings and says that the development of the asbestos-base friction-bearing has made possible the multiple-disc dry-plate and the single-plate types. For severe service, the qualifications of a satisfactory friction-facing are density of structure, together with a reasonably high tensile-strength; the coefficient of friction should be high and fairly constant over a wide range of temperature; the facing must be able to withstand high temperature without deterioration; the impregnating compound must not bleed out at high temperature; and the permeation of the impregnating solution must be complete so that the wear resistance is constant throughout the thickness of the facing. The molded and the woven types of facing are treated at length.
Technical Paper

THE WEYMANN SILENT FLEXIBLE BODY1

1925-01-01
250021
Body construction, of a character such that the wooden framework is secured by suitably shaped steel joining-plates and bolts that separate the wooden members ⅛ in. at the joints, is illustrated and described. The outer surface of the body is completely covered with flexible textile fabric or leather-cloth. It is claimed that the effect is to impart to the finished body an easy deformability and to permit it to accommodate itself to distortions of the chassis frame, to which it is rigidly attached. A portion of the English patent specification is quoted, and details of the actual construction practised at the inventor's factory in Paris, Prance, are stated. Due to the absence of steel and to the extreme slenderness of the wooden parts, these bodies are very light. The required wood-working operations are few and simple. Only the minimum machine equipment is needed to fabricate the framework, and no great skill is demanded in its erection.
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