Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 4 of 4
Technical Paper

CAN Crypto FPGA Chip to Secure Data Transmitted Through CAN FD Bus Using AES-128 and SHA-1 Algorithms with A Symmetric Key

2017-03-28
2017-01-1612
Robert Bosch GmBH proposed in 2012 a new version of communication protocol named as Controller area network with Flexible Data-Rate (CANFD), that supports data frames up to 64 bytes compared to 8 bytes of CAN. With limited data frame size of CAN message, and it is impossible to be encrypted and secured. With this new feature of CAN FD, we propose a hardware design - CAN crypto FPGA chip to secure data transmitted through CAN FD bus by using AES-128 and SHA-1 algorithms with a symmetric key. AES-128 algorithm will provide confidentiality of CAN message and SHA-1 algorithm with a symmetric key (HMAC) will provide integrity and authentication of CAN message. The design has been modeled and verified by using Verilog HDL – a hardware description language, and implemented successfully into Xilinx FPGA chip by using simulation tool ISE (Xilinx).
Standard

Digital Communications for Plug-in Electric Vehicles

2014-12-11
CURRENT
J2931/1_201412
This SAE Information Report SAE J2931 establishes the requirements for digital communication between Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEV), the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and the utility or service provider, Energy Services Interface (ESI), Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and Home Area Network (HAN). This is the third version of this document and completes the effort that specifies the digital communication protocol stack between Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) and the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). The purpose of the stack outlined in Figure 1 and defined by Layers 3 to 6 of the OSI Reference Model (Figure 1) is to use the functions of Layers 1 and 2 specified in SAE J2931/4 and export the functionalities to Layer 7 as specified in SAE J2847/2 (as of August 1, 2012, revision) and SAE J2847/1 (targeting revision at the end of 2012).
Book

Data Acquisition from Light-Duty Vehicles Using OBD and CAN

2018-11-15
Modern vehicles have multiple electronic control units (ECU) to control various subsystems such as the engine, brakes, steering, air conditioning, and infotainment. These ECUs are networked together to share information directly with each other. This in-vehicle network provides a data opportunity for improved maintenance, fleet management, warranty and legal issues, reliability, and accident reconstruction. Data Acquisition from Light-Duty Vehicles Using OBD and CAN is a guide for the reader on how to acquire and correctly interpret data from the in-vehicle network of light-duty (LD) vehicles. The reader will learn how to determine what data is available on the vehicle's network, acquire messages and convert them to scaled engineering parameters, apply more than 25 applicable standards, and understand 15 important test modes.
Article

Nvidia partners with AdaCore to secure self-driving firmware

2019-02-14
As mobility software becomes increasingly complex and connected, so does the risk of human error and system safety. To combat this, New York-based software company AdaCore will work with Nvidia Corporation of Santa Clara, California to apply open-source Ada and SPARK programming languages for select software security firmware elements in highly-complex, safety-critical systems like Nvidia’s DRIVE AGX automated and autonomous vehicle solutions.
X