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Journal Article

The Missing Link: Aircraft Cybersecurity at the Operational Level

2020-07-25
Abstract Aircraft cybersecurity efforts have tended to focus at the strategic or tactical levels without a clear connection between the two. ...CSSEP’s process model postulates that security is best achieved by a balance of cybersecurity, cyber resiliency, defensibility, and recoverability and that control is best established by developing security constraints versus attempting to find every vulnerability. ...CSSEP identifies the major functions needed to do effective aircraft cybersecurity and provides a flexible framework as the “missing link” to connect the strategic and tactical levels of aircraft cybersecurity.
Training / Education

DO-326A and ED-202A An Introduction to the New and Mandatory Aviation Cyber-Security Essentials

2021-03-08
The international standards D-326A (U.S.) and ED-202A (Europe) titled "Airworthiness Security Process Specification" are the cornerstones of the "DO-326/ED-202 Set" and they are the only Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) by FAA & EASA for aviation cyber-security airworthiness certification, as of 2019. The "DO-326/ED-202 Set" also includes companion documents DO-356A/ED-203A: "Airworthiness Security Methods and Considerations" & DO-355/ED-204: "Information Security Guidance for Continuing Airworthiness" (U.S. & Europe) and ED-201: "Aeronautical Information System Security (AISS) Framework Guidance" & ED-205: "Process Standard for Security Certification / Declaration of Air Traffic Management / Air Navigation Services (ATM/ANS) Ground Systems“ (Europe only).
Standard

GUIDANCE FOR SECURITY EVENT LOGGING IN AN IP ENVIRONMENT

2017-06-21
CURRENT
ARINC852
This report sets forth guidance for IP-based onboard networks and systems residing in the Airline Information Services (AIS) and Passenger Information and Entertainment Services (PIES) Domains by establishing a common set of security related data elements and format(s) that are produced by aircraft systems, suitable for use by airline IT and/or avionic supplier analytical ground tools.
Standard

Unmanned Systems (UxS) Control Segment (UCS) Architecture: Architecture Description

2020-07-14
CURRENT
AS6512A
This document is the Architecture Description (AD) for the SAE Unmanned Systems (UxS) Control Segment (UCS) Architecture Library Revision A or, simply, the UCS Architecture. The architecture is expressed by a library of SAE publications as referenced herein. The other publications in the UCS Architecture Library Revision A are: AS6513A, AS6518A, AS6522A, and AS6969A.
Standard

Requirements for a COTS Assembly Management Plan

2020-08-03
CURRENT
EIA933C
This document applies to the development of Plans for integrating and managing COTS assemblies in electronic equipment and Systems for the commercial, military, and space markets; as well as other ADHP markets that wish to use this document. For purposes of this document, COTS assemblies are viewed as electronic assemblies such as printed wiring assemblies, relays, disk drives, LCD matrices, VME circuit cards, servers, printers, laptop computers, etc. There are many ways to categorize COTS assemblies1, including the following spectrum: At one end of the spectrum are COTS assemblies whose design, internal parts2, materials, configuration control, traceability, reliability, and qualification methods are at least partially controlled, or influenced, by ADHP customers (either individually or collectively). An example at this end of the spectrum is a VME circuit card assembly.
Standard

Airworthiness Assurance for Airborne Electronic Hardware (AEH) Containing Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Electronic Components

2018-12-19
WIP
ARP7495
This document addresses issues related to assurance that COTS electronic hardware components will perform their intended function in the AEH equipment or system in which they are installed. Those issues may impact system design, reliability assessment, quality, testing, production or support; but this document is not intended to be specific to any of those disciplines. This document is focused on the hardware issues raised in DOT/FAA/TC-16/57; it does not include issues related to software, firmware, etc. This document is intended to fit within the development process for civil aircraft and systems. This document can be used to support design and analysis activities in RTCA DO-254/EUROCAE ED-80 and RTCA DO-297/EUROCAE ED-124, as well as SAE ARP4754. This document addresses twelve (12) of the twenty-six (26) specific issues described in DOT/FAA/TC-16/57.
Standard

Standard for Preparing a DMSMS Management Plan

2017-04-14
WIP
STD0016A
This document defines the requirements for developing a DMSMS Management Plan, hereinafter also called the Plan, to assure customers that the Plan owner is using a proactive DMSMS process for minimizing the cost and impact that part and material obsolescence will have on equipment delivered by the Plan owner. The technical requirements detailed in clause 5 ensure that the Plan owner can meet the requirement of having a process to address obsolescence as required by Industry Standards such as EIA-4899 "Standard for Preparing an Electronic Components Management Plan" and DoD Programs as required by MIL-STD-3018 "Parts Management". Owners of DMSMS Management Plans include System Integrators, Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM), and logistics support providers.
Technical Paper

Communication between Plug-in Vehicles and the Utility Grid

2010-04-12
2010-01-0837
This paper is the first in a series of documents designed to record the progress of the SAE J2293 Task Force as it continues to develop and refine the communication requirements between Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEV) and the Electric Utility Grid. In February, 2008 the SAE Task Force was formed and it started by reviewing the existing SAE J2293 standard, which was originally developed by the Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Controls Task Force in the 1990s. This legacy standard identified the communication requirements between the Electric Vehicle (EV) and the EV Supply Equipment (EVSE), including off-board charging systems necessary to transfer DC energy to the vehicle. It was apparent at the first Task Force meeting that the communications requirements between the PEV and utility grid being proposed by industry stakeholders were vastly different in the type of communications and messaging documented in the original standard.
Journal Article

An Approach to Verification of Interference Concerns for Multicore Systems (CAST-32A)

2020-03-10
2020-01-0016
The avionics industry is moving towards the use of multicore systems to meet the demands of modern avionics applications. In multicore systems, interference can affect execution timing behavior, including worst case execution time (WCET), as identified in the FAA CAST-32A position paper. Examining and verifying the effects of interference is critical in the production of safety-critical avionics software for multicore architectures. Multicore processor hardware along with aerospace RTOS providers increasingly offers robust partitioning technologies to help developers mitigate the effects of interference. These technologies enable the partitioning of cores for different applications at different criticalities and make it possible to run multiple applications on one specific core. When incorporated into system-design considerations, these partitioning mechanisms can be used to reduce the effects of interference on software performance.
Standard

Digital Communications for Plug-in Electric Vehicles

2014-12-11
CURRENT
J2931/1_201412
This SAE Information Report SAE J2931 establishes the requirements for digital communication between Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEV), the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and the utility or service provider, Energy Services Interface (ESI), Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and Home Area Network (HAN). This is the third version of this document and completes the effort that specifies the digital communication protocol stack between Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) and the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). The purpose of the stack outlined in Figure 1 and defined by Layers 3 to 6 of the OSI Reference Model (Figure 1) is to use the functions of Layers 1 and 2 specified in SAE J2931/4 and export the functionalities to Layer 7 as specified in SAE J2847/2 (as of August 1, 2012, revision) and SAE J2847/1 (targeting revision at the end of 2012).
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