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Technical Paper

Cyber Security in the Automotive Domain – An Overview

2017-03-28
2017-01-1652
Driven by the growing internet and remote connectivity of automobiles, combined with the emerging trend to automated driving, the importance of security for automotive systems is massively increasing. Although cyber security is a common part of daily routines in the traditional IT domain, necessary security mechanisms are not yet widely applied in the vehicles. At first glance, this may not appear to be a problem as there are lots of solutions from other domains, which potentially could be re-used. But substantial differences compared to an automotive environment have to be taken into account, drastically reducing the possibilities for simple reuse. Our contribution is to address automotive electronics engineers who are confronted with security requirements. Therefore, it will firstly provide some basic knowledge about IT security and subsequently present a selection of automotive specific security use cases.
Technical Paper

Communication between Plug-in Vehicles and the Utility Grid

2010-04-12
2010-01-0837
This paper is the first in a series of documents designed to record the progress of the SAE J2293 Task Force as it continues to develop and refine the communication requirements between Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEV) and the Electric Utility Grid. In February, 2008 the SAE Task Force was formed and it started by reviewing the existing SAE J2293 standard, which was originally developed by the Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Controls Task Force in the 1990s. This legacy standard identified the communication requirements between the Electric Vehicle (EV) and the EV Supply Equipment (EVSE), including off-board charging systems necessary to transfer DC energy to the vehicle. It was apparent at the first Task Force meeting that the communications requirements between the PEV and utility grid being proposed by industry stakeholders were vastly different in the type of communications and messaging documented in the original standard.
Technical Paper

Hardware/Software Co-Design of an Automotive Embedded Firewall

2017-03-28
2017-01-1659
The automotive industry experiences a major change as vehicles are gradually becoming a part of the Internet. Security concepts based on the closed-world assumption cannot be deployed anymore due to a constantly changing adversary model. Automotive Ethernet as future in-vehicle network and a new E/E Architecture have different security requirements than Ethernet known from traditional IT and legacy systems. In order to achieve a high level of security, a new multi-layer approach in the vehicle which responds to special automotive requirements has to be introduced. One essential layer of this holistic security concept is to restrict non-authorized access by the deployment of embedded firewalls. This paper addresses the introduction of automotive firewalls into the next-generation domain architecture with a focus on partitioning of its features in hardware and software.
Standard

Digital Communications for Plug-in Electric Vehicles

2014-12-11
CURRENT
J2931/1_201412
This SAE Information Report SAE J2931 establishes the requirements for digital communication between Plug-In Electric Vehicles (PEV), the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and the utility or service provider, Energy Services Interface (ESI), Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) and Home Area Network (HAN). This is the third version of this document and completes the effort that specifies the digital communication protocol stack between Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) and the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE). The purpose of the stack outlined in Figure 1 and defined by Layers 3 to 6 of the OSI Reference Model (Figure 1) is to use the functions of Layers 1 and 2 specified in SAE J2931/4 and export the functionalities to Layer 7 as specified in SAE J2847/2 (as of August 1, 2012, revision) and SAE J2847/1 (targeting revision at the end of 2012).
Article

Nvidia partners with AdaCore to secure self-driving firmware

2019-02-14
As mobility software becomes increasingly complex and connected, so does the risk of human error and system safety. To combat this, New York-based software company AdaCore will work with Nvidia Corporation of Santa Clara, California to apply open-source Ada and SPARK programming languages for select software security firmware elements in highly-complex, safety-critical systems like Nvidia’s DRIVE AGX automated and autonomous vehicle solutions.
Article

Virtual factories accelerate collaboration, advance technologies

2019-08-26
The Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing (CCAM), a non-profit consortium based in Prince George County, Virginia, uses a 3D visualization lab to expand beyond the walls of its 62,000-square-foot brick and mortar facility and deliver a collaborative development for researchers in industry, academia, and government.
Article

MOBI rolls out the first blockchain-enabled Vehicle Identity (VID) mobility standard

2019-07-18
The Mobility Open Blockchain Initiative – a global nonprofit working to create standards in blockchain, distributed ledgers, and related technologies for consumers, smart cities, and mobility – has launched the industry's first vehicle identification (VID) standard incorporating blockchain technology into a digital vehicle identification system.
Article

Europe’s blockchain-based Smart E-Mobility Challenge will conclude this May in Germany

2019-05-07
TIoTA, an open software consortium of over 50 members organized to support the creation of a secure, scalable, interoperable, and trusted IoT ecosystem, began the E-Mobility Challenge to link IoT devices with consumers and stakeholder companies such as operators and service, communication, and payment providers within the preexisting European electric vehicle ecosystem.
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