Refine Your Search

Topic

Author

Affiliation

Search Results

Technical Paper

Integration of Charting into the Glass Cockpit

1992-10-01
921905
Pilots of aircraft flown in instrument conditions, during periods of darkness, or restricted visibility are not provided with information that is essential to maintain the situational awareness required for the safe operation of their aircraft. The pilot's critical need for this information is neither widely perceived nor being quickly acted upon. This paper describes these information deficiencies and suggests methods of utilizing the pictorial display of electronic charting information, coupled with a precision navigation device such as the Global Positioning System (GPS), to satisfy this critical need.
Technical Paper

Human Factors Associated with Glass Cockpit Design

1987-05-01
871036
The second generation glass cockpit is now being developed following the success and acceptance of the Electronic Flight Instrument Systems (EFIS) in the aviation marketplace. ...Along with this new generation of displays, comes new symbology which is replacing some of the conventional displays now found in the cockpit. This paper outlines the history of the current display symbology and describes what is currently being implemented in the new systems.
Technical Paper

A Glass Cockpit Crew Activity Analysis Tool

2000-10-10
2000-01-5522
This paper describes a model-based tool for analyzing the activities of glass cockpit flight crews. The tool is based on the Crew Activity Tracking System (CATS). CATS has been extended to provide visualization and data playback capabilities to support analysis of pilot-automation interaction.
Technical Paper

Data, Decisions, and Cockpit Technology

1992-10-01
922049
During the past two decades, avionics advances have brought increasingly sophisticated technology into the cockpit. These advances were intended to provide benefits in both operating economics and safety. ...Researchers and industry experts have expressed the need for a high level philosophy to guide the development of effective cockpit automation. As these philosophies emerge, they agree on the need for the flight crew to be at the center of the operational loop.
Standard

Human Interface Criteria for Cockpit Display of Traffic Information

2020-12-09
CURRENT
ARP5365A
This SAE Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) sets forth design and operational recommendations concerning the human factors issues and criteria for cockpit display of traffic information systems. The visual and aural characteristics are covered for both the alerting components and traffic depiction/situation components.
Journal Article

F-35 Lightning II Cockpit Vision

2010-10-19
2010-01-2330
A brief explanation of the design iterations and philosophy used to integrate the pilot into the F-35 Lightning II cockpit to achieve optimum Pilot Vehicle Interface (PVI), manageable single seat workload, and superior situation awareness.
Technical Paper

The Cockpit of the Future - The Captain's Role

1990-12-01
902343
The traditional role of the airline captain as a team leader and mentor for the cockpit and cabin crews in the aircraft of the future will continue but may be modified by some very potent factors - the new generation cockpits, the operational environment and the training required to equip the flight crews to operate safely in the future. ...The traditional role of the airline captain as a team leader and mentor for the cockpit and cabin crews in the aircraft of the future will continue but may be modified by some very potent factors - the new generation cockpits, the operational environment and the training required to equip the flight crews to operate safely in the future. ...The challenge to those who influence the cockpit environment, i.e. the aircraft manufacturers, the airlines, the regulatory agencies and the flight crews themselves, will be to create “user friendly” equipment and procedures rather than spend enormous amounts of time and money in future aircraft modifications and/or otherwise better utilized training to overcome the built-in deficiencies in the cockpit environment.
Technical Paper

Electric Vehicle Cockpit and Lightweight Components Development

1998-02-23
980436
Solectria Sunrise can be driven 204 miles without recharging1, can achieve a top speed of 75 mph, and can accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 17 seconds.2 TAC has developed the following components made from glass reinforced urethanes or lightweight urethane materials: structural cockpit assembly (including cross car beam and ducting), fascia, bumper beams, and other related components. ...Textron Automotive Company (TAC) has been selected to develop the cockpit instrument panel, front fascia and bumper beam to the Solectria Sunrise, an all composite four-passenger mass-producible electric vehicle funded by Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) and Boston Edison. ...Key technology gains included a one piece structural cockpit which incorporates the ducting, steering column and cross car support into the ambidextrous (right-hand or left-hand drive) instrument panel, instrument panel cluster pods for interchangeability of drivers and passenger side pods, a structural reinforced polyurethane bumper beam without a separate energy absorber which meets the 5 mph impact testing, a filled urethane fascia weighing 7% less than conventional urethane fascia, and the use of low cost tooling.
Technical Paper

Application of CRT Displays to the Cockpit of Tomorrow

1980-09-01
801168
The CRT display applications in the current generation air transport aircraft are limited to weather radar displays and a few navigation displays. Flight decks of the aircraft of tomorrow, however, will be dominated by CRT displays. The CRT's will cover multiple applications such as flight instruments (ADI, HSI), engine displays, head-up displays, caution warnings, and aircraft systems. This paper describes these new CRT display systems, their capabilities, and their impact on aircraft operation.
Standard

MULTIPLE-INPUT COCKPIT PRINTER

1998-06-01
CURRENT
ARINC740-1
This standard describes the form, fit, function and interfaces of an airborne printer capable of communicating with multiple systems one at a time. The printer contains the circuitry for acquisition, buffering and processing of coded alphanumeric messages for print-out on half-width paper.
Technical Paper

Practical Study of Automotive HVAC Integration into Cockpit Modules

2001-05-14
2001-01-1745
A natural progression of this concept is the integration of automotive HVAC systems into these cockpit modules. This paper implements a practical study of HVAC implementation into cockpit modules and analyzes the effect on the perceived benefits of Integration. ...The development of highly integrated cockpit modules has been identified by many of the OEM's and Tier 1 suppliers to be an imperative technology in the constant effort to, reduce cost, reduce mass, reduce complexity, increase quality and improve recyclability over traditional instrument panels.
Technical Paper

Development of Lightweight, Modular Hybrid-Material Cockpit Structures for Passenger Vehicles

2005-04-11
2005-01-1220
The cockpit module is one of the most challenging vehicle systems due both to the complexity of its design and its role in maintaining passenger safety in the event of a crash. ...Hence, most cockpits feature mature designs and traditional components. An innovative new design methodology now permits the development of multifunctional components and integrated cockpit systems that meet all global safety requirements, communize components across multiple platforms and models, while also reducing weight, systems costs, part count, and warranty issues. ...An innovative new design methodology now permits the development of multifunctional components and integrated cockpit systems that meet all global safety requirements, communize components across multiple platforms and models, while also reducing weight, systems costs, part count, and warranty issues.
Standard

COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER (CVR)

2015-08-05
CURRENT
ARINC757-6
This document provides guidance for the development and installation of a Cockpit Voice Recorders (CVR) with solid-state memory. Supplement 6 provides the following: " The optional interfaces to data link services and On-Board Maintenance System (OMS) were revised to clarify that if the optional interface is implemented, then it shall be implemented in a specific way. " The power input section was revised to clarity the need for the CVR to be designed to accept 115 Vac power and 28 Vdc power from the aircraft. " The time correlation requirement was revised to specify that the CVR should receive its time signal from the same source as the Flight Data Recorder (FDR). " The OMS interface was updated to describe the correct ARINC 429 Sign Status Matrix (SSM) encoding for new CVR designs.
Standard

COCKPIT VOICE RECORDER (CVR)

2005-08-05
CURRENT
ARINC757A-1
This Characteristic provides guidance for the development and installation of a new generation of Cockpit Voice Recorders (CVRs) using solid-state memory. This document supersedes the earlier ARINC Characteristic 557.
X