Refine Your Search

Topic

Search Results

Technical Paper

Vehicle Data Sources for Accident Reconstruction

1988-02-01
880070
A major component in reconstructing motor vehicle accidents is the use of accurate data about the vehicles involved in the accident. Whether the reconstruction is done manually or with the aid of computers, the accuracy of the reconstruction is directly proportional to the accuracy of the vehicle data. ...Whether the reconstruction is done manually or with the aid of computers, the accuracy of the reconstruction is directly proportional to the accuracy of the vehicle data. ...Unfortunately, the vehicle data is not always available from the actual vehicles involved in the accident. In these instances, the reconstructionist must obtain data that best approximates the original vehicles.
Technical Paper

Application and Misapplication of Computer Programs for Accident Reconstruction

1989-02-01
890738
Several computer programs are used by accident investigators to reconstruct motor vehicle accidents. These programs are seen as valuable tools by most investigators. ...This paper addresses five different types of computer programs used by accident investigators and discusses their proper and improper use. Most frequently, misuse is due to the lack of a thorough understanding of how the programs work.
Technical Paper

A Personal Computer Program for Drawing Accident Sites

1988-02-01
880068
Its use with other computer accident reconstruction programs is illustrated. It is seen that the scaled accident site diagram provides an important element to the reconstruction, both as an analytical tool as well as a presentation tool. ...Standard features are explained and features unique to the needs of the accident reconstructionist, such as photogrammetry and a built-in accident site template, are presented. ...A personal computer program for drawing accident sites is described. The program design is reviewed and hardware requirements are defined.
Technical Paper

Three-Dimensional Reconstruction and Simulation of Motor Vehicle Accidents

1996-02-01
960890
This paper describes the use of 3-D technologies for reconstructing and simulating motor vehicle accidents involving humans (occupants and pedestrians) and vehicles (passenger cars, pickups, vans, multi-purpose vehicles, on-highway trucks and vehicle-trailers). ...Various reconstruction and simulation models are illustrated. The features and limitations of each model are addressed.
Technical Paper

Differences Between EDCRASH and CRASH3

1985-02-25
850253
Its design also allowed for file saving, graphics, routing of output, and interfacing with other accident reconstruction programs. For most accident types, the results for both programs were identical. ...Motor vehicle accident researchers have used the CRASH computer program for some time. Over the years, the code was upgraded until it reached its present and popular form, CRASH3, which runs on a mainframe computer or minicomputer with a sizeable memory capacity.
Technical Paper

The Scientific Visualization of Motor Vehicle Accidents

1994-03-01
940922
This paper describes the use of scientific visualization as a tool for investigating the cause of motor vehicle accidents. A specific accident is reconstructed and simulated. This simulation data is then presented three ways: (1) as a table of numeric results, (2) as a 2-D, graphical simulation viewed from above, and (3) as a fully rendered, 3-D scientific visualization.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the Way EDSMAC Computes Delta-V

1988-02-01
880069
The EDSMAC personal computer program for use by accident investigators is described. The input data requirements are reviewed. The general calculation procedures are discussed and the specific procedures for computing delta-V are explained in detail. ...The major benefit of EDSMAC is the ability, using graphics, to provide an analytical method illustrating how an accident may, or may not, have occurred.
Technical Paper

A Computer Graphics Interface Specification for Studying Humans, Vehicles and Their Environment

1993-03-01
930903
This paper describes a general purpose computer graphics interface for performing detailed two- and three-dimensional studies involving the dynamic response of humans and vehicles during the pre-crash, crash and post-crash phases of a motor vehicle accident. Specifications are provided for human, vehicle and environment models which can be constructed and analyzed using the interface.
Technical Paper

Further Validation of EDCRASH Using the RICSAC Staged Collisions

1989-02-01
890740
An example was used to illustrate the use of the confidence intervals to estimate the expected range of impact speed for a given reconstruction. The results for oblique collisions were found to be significantly more accurate than the results for collinear collisions.
Technical Paper

Validation of the SIMON Model for Vehicle Handling and Collision Simulation - Comparison of Results with Experiments and Other Models

2004-03-08
2004-01-1207
Applications include suspension modeling, vehicle-tire system modeling, brake system modeling, virtual prototyping and compliance testing (ISO braking and lane change maneuvers) and safety analysis (collision simulation and post-crash reconstruction of actual on-road events). Advances in vehicle modeling and computer hardware and software technologies have made possible significant improvements in vehicle simulation, resulting in newer and more powerful modeling capability.
Technical Paper

Case Studies Involving the Use and Non-Use of Seatbelts

1986-11-01
861091
This paper presents the case study results of several actual motor vehicle accidents which occurred in the western U.S. Each case was analyzed to determine the characteristics of impact to the vehicle and the resulting occupant injuries.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the HVE Developer's Toolkit

1994-03-01
940923
A substantial programming effort is required to develop a human or vehicle dynamics simulator. More than half of this effort is spent designing and programming the user interface (the means by which the user supplies program input and views program output). This paper describes a pre-programmed, 3-dimensional (3-D), input/output window-type interface which may be used by developers of human and vehicle dynamics programs. By using this interface, the task of input/output programming is reduced by approximately 50 percent, while simultaneously providing a more robust interface. This paper provides a conceptual overview of the interface, as well as specific details for writing human and vehicle dynamics programs which are compatible with the interface. Structures are provided for the human, vehicle and environment models. Structures are also provided for events, interface variables, and the output data stream.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the HVE Human Model

1995-02-01
950659
Developers of human dynamics simulation software inherently use a mathematical/physical model to represent the human. This paper describes a pre-programmed, object-oriented human model for use in human dynamics simulations. This human model is included as part of an integrated simulation environment, called HVE (Human-Vehicle-Environment), described in previous research. The current paper first provides a general overview of the HVE user and development environments, and then provides detailed specifications for the HVE Human Model. These specifications include definitions for model parameters (supported human types and human properties, such as dimensions, inertias, joints and injury tolerances). The paper also provides detailed specifications for the HVE time-dependent human output group parameters (kinematics, joints, contacts, belts and airbags).
Technical Paper

Further Validation of EDSMAC Using the RICSAC Staged Collisions

1990-02-01
900102
The accuracy of the SMAC computer program was evaluated in terms of its ability to predict the correct paths and damage profiles for vehicles involved in a crash. A comparison of the results from SMAC and EDSMAC were presented along with measured results from twelve staged collisions. Statistical analysis of those results revealed the average path error was 25 to 29 percent and the average damage profile error was 109 to 287 percent. A procedure was presented for improving the match between simulated and measured paths. After using this procedure, the average path error was reduced to -2 to 7 percent and the average damage profile error was 54 to 186 percent. CDC predictions were very good. Damage profile errors, which did not reduce the program's overall effectiveness, were the result of the way the program computes inter-vehicle forces, leading to a recommendation that the algorithm be reformulated to include an initial force coefficient.
Technical Paper

An Overview of the HVE Vehicle Model

1995-02-01
950308
Developers of vehicle dynamics simulation software inherently use a mathematical/physical model to represent the vehicle. This paper describes a pre-programmed, object-oriented vehicle model for use in vehicle dynamics simulations. This vehicle model is included as part of an integrated simulation environment, called HVE (Human-Vehicle-Environment), described in previous research [1,2] *. The current paper first provides a general overview of the HVE user and development environments, and then provides detailed specifications for the HVE Vehicle Model. These specifications include definitions for model parameters (supported vehicle types; vehicle properties, such as dimensions, inertias, suspensions; tire properties, such as dimensions and inertias, mu vs slip, cornering and camber stiffnesses; driver control systems, such as engine, transmission/differential, brakes and steering; restraint systems, such as belts and airbags).
Technical Paper

Validation of DyMESH for Vehicle vs Barrier Collisions

2000-03-06
2000-01-0844
A new three-dimensional collision simulation algorithm, called DyMESH (Dynamic MEchanical SHell) was recently introduced.[1]* This paper presents a validation of DyMESH for vehicle vs. barrier collisions. The derivation of the three-dimensional force vs. crush relationship was described previously.[1] Here the application of three-dimensional force vs. crush curves using the outlined methodology is shown to be effective. Nonlinear force versus crush relationships are introduced for use in DyMESH. Included are numerous DyMESH collision simulations of several types of vehicles (e.g., light and heavy passenger car and sport utility) compared directly with experimental collision test results from various types of barrier tests (e.g., full frontal, angled frontal, and offset frontal). The focus here is not on the vehicle’s change in velocity, but on the acceleration vs. time history.
X