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Technical Paper

PC-Crash and HVE, an Overview of Similarities and Differences

2001-03-05
2001-01-0505
HVE 1 and PC-Crash 2 have been the subject of numerous SAE papers. Both programs have been offered to reconstructionists for the purpose of analyzing vehicle accidents and presenting the resulting motions in 3D graphical form.
Technical Paper

Reconstruction of Twenty Staged Collisions with PC-Crash's Optimizer

2001-03-05
2001-01-0507
An optimizer tool in PC-Crash is designed to minimize reconstruction time and error by automatically varying a selected number of impact parameters, comparing the resulting simulation for each combination of parameters with the actual incident. ...Twenty staged collisions were reconstructed with the optimizer tool in PC-Crash. These staged collisions had been previously reconstructed with a combination of manual linear momentum calculations combined with the trajectory model in an earlier version of PC-Crash. ...These staged collisions had been previously reconstructed with a combination of manual linear momentum calculations combined with the trajectory model in an earlier version of PC-Crash. Differences between the reconstruction simulations and the actual collisions, and methods for minimizing reconstruction errors, are discussed.
Technical Paper

Application of the Monte Carlo Methods for Stability Analysis within the Accident Reconstruction Software PC-CRASH

2003-03-03
2003-01-0488
During recent years the accident simulation program PC-CRASH was developed, which allows simulating the vehicles movement before, during and after the impact. ...The first one serves as an alternative for the optimizer tool and is included in the current version of PC-Crash. It gives reasonable insight in the variation of certain parameters in reasonable calculation time.
Technical Paper

Uncertainty in Calculations Using Lambourn's Critical Speed Procedure

2013-04-08
2013-01-0779
Critical Speed Formula (CSF) belongs to the canon of tools used in reconstruction of vehicle accidents. It is used to calculate vehicle speed at the beginning of tire yaw marks and, together with the entire methodology of processing the information contained in the marks into the data, is often referred to as the Critical Speed Method (CSM). Its great practical importance as well as recurring doubts as to the reliability make it one of the best experimentally and theoretically studied methods. Although the CSF applies in fact to a point mass, it is used with reference to a vehicle, i.e., an increasingly complicated multi-body system. Accident reconstruction experts point out the particular usefulness of Lambourn's research concerning the CSM in respect to a passenger car.
Technical Paper

Real-time Crash Detection and Its Application in Incident Reporting and Accident Reconstruction

2017-03-28
2017-01-1419
Characterizing or reconstructing incidents ranging from light to heavy crashes is one of the enablers for mobility solutions for fleet management, car-sharing, ride-hailing, insurance etc. While crashes involving airbag deployment are noticeable, light crashes without airbag deployment can be hidden and most drivers do not report these incidents. In this paper, we are using vehicle responses together with a dynamics model to trace back if abnormal forces have been applied to a vehicle so as to detect light crashes. The crash location around the perimeter of the vehicle, the direction of the crash force, and the severity of the crashes are all determined in real-time based on on-board sensor measurements which has further application in accident reconstruction. All of this information will be integrated to a feature called “Incident Report”, which enable reporting of minor accidents to the relevant entities such as insurance agencies, fleet managements, etc.
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