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Technical Paper

COMBUSTION OF FUELS IN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES

1920-01-01
200069
The automotive industry was considered a mechanical one until fuel difficulties caused a realization that the internal-combustion engine is only a piece of apparatus for the effective utilization of chemistry. The only great cloud on the horizon of the automotive industry today is the fuel problem, one way to dispel it being to increase the supply and the other to make the automotive device do what it has been designed to do. The author reviews the production of oil and of automotive apparatus, considers the available fuels and states the two distinct parts of the fuel problem as being first carburetion and distribution, external to the engine and one of purely physical relationship, and, second, the combustion of fuel inside the engine cylinder. The subjects of regulating combustion by additions to the fuel, the chemistry of fuels and the burning of heavy fuels are discussed at length.
Technical Paper

BATTERY-IGNITION SYSTEM

1920-01-01
200063
A brief outline of the elementary principles of the operation of jump-spark ignition systems is given preliminarily to the discussion of the advantages of battery-type systems, and four vital elements in a jump-spark ignition system are stated. A diagram is shown and explained of an hydraulic analogy, followed by a discussion of oscillating voltage and oscillograms of what occurs in the primary circuit of an ignition system when the secondary is disconnected. The subjects of spark-plug gaps and current values receive considerable attention and similar treatment is accorded magneto speeds and spark polarity, numerous oscillograms accompanying the text. The effects of magneto and of battery ignition on engine power are stated and commented upon and this is followed by a lengthy comparison of battery and magneto ignition, illustrated with charts.
Technical Paper

CLEVELAND SECTION PAPERS ADVANTAGES OF MAGNETO IGNITION

1920-01-01
200062
A discussion of the advantages of magneto ignition resolves itself into a comparison of magneto and battery-ignition systems, resembling early discussions of the relative merits of the direct and the alternating-current electric systems; both are in existence and fulfilling their respective parts. After stating that ignition is closely related to carburetion and generalizing on the subject of ignition, the author discusses the fundamentals of ignition systems at length, presenting numerous diagrams, and passes to somewhat detailed consideration of comparative spark values, using illustrations. Storage batteries and auxiliary devices receive due attention next and numerous characteristic curves of battery and magneto ignition are shown. Impulse couplings are advantageous in starting large truck and tractor engines, which generally use magnetos; these are described.
Technical Paper

PENNSYLVANIA SECTION PAPER - ENGINEERING POSSIBILITIES AS INDICATED BY THE PROGRESS OF SCIENCE

1920-01-01
200082
The author views in perspective some facts from a purely scientific standpoint, and then shows their application to problems of the automotive industry. After reviewing the present facilities for measurement and the ability to make measurements of distances both infinitely small and large, as an aid toward a proper conception of the ultimate structure of matter, he applies this scientific knowledge in the direction of a solution of the fuel problem, which is a fundamental one because it involves the limitation of a natural resource. From 1918 and 1919 statistics, the amount of gasoline produced was something like 20 to 25 per cent of the crude oil pumped; 8 to 10 per cent is kerosene and 50 per cent is gas and fuel oil and a residue carrying lubricating oil, paraffin and carbon. Kerosene demand and production are practically fixed quantities; gasoline demands are increasing.
Technical Paper

KEROSENE AS A TRACTOR FUEL

1920-01-01
200078
Kerosene has advanced to the front rank as a fuel for the farm tractor within a decade. A heavily preponderating majority of tractors burn kerosene. The history of early oil engines is reviewed and some comparative costs of kerosene and gasoline fuel for tractors, obtained from tests made in January, 1920, are given. Kerosene tractor-engine development is then discussed. The conditions required for complete combustion are the same in principle for both kerosene and gasoline, but in actual practice a wider latitude in providing ideal conditions is permissible for gasoline than for kerosene. The four classes of commercial liquid fuels usable in internal-combustion engines are the alcohols, the gasolines, the common kerosenes and the low-cost heavy-oil fuels. The alcohols rank lowest in heating value per pound of combustible. Under existing economic conditions neither alcohol nor the fuel oils require consideration as available fuels for the tractor.
Technical Paper

DESIGN OF INTAKE MANIFOLDS FOR HEAVY FUELS

1920-01-01
200043
The adoption of the present system of feeding a number of cylinders in succession through a common intake manifold was based upon the idea that the fuel mixture would consist of air impregnated or carbureted with hydrocarbon vapor, but if the original designers of internal-combustion engines had supposed that the fuel would not be vaporized, existing instead as a more or less fine spray in suspension in the incoming air, it is doubtful that they would have had the courage to construct an engine with this type of fuel intake. That present fuel does not readily change to hydrocarbon vapor in the intake manifold is indicated by tables of vapor density of the different paraffin series of hydrocarbon compounds.
Technical Paper

SOME FACTORS OF ENGINE PERFORMANCE

1920-01-01
200042
A large number of tests were made in the altitude laboratory of the Bureau of Standards, using aircraft engines. The complete analysis of these tests was conducted under the direction of the Powerplants Committee of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Many of the engines were of the same make, differing in compression ratio or dimensions. The testing program included determinations of the brake-horsepower at various speeds and altitudes, or air densities, and the friction power, or the power required to operate the engine with no fuel or ignition at various speeds and air densities, with normal operating conditions of oil, water and the like. Some tests included determination of the effect of change of mixture ratio and of air temperature, and of different oils. The difficulties caused by the necessity of using indirect methods to ascertain the effect of various factors are outlined. The test analyses and curves are presented.
Technical Paper

FACTORS INVOLVED IN HIGH AIRPLANE SPEED AT GREAT ALTITUDES

1920-01-01
200045
The development of the supercharger for aircraft engines has led to the possibility of hitherto unheard-of speed of transportation. An analysis of a definite case is presented to show the different aspects of the problem in a practical form, with a view toward determining what can reasonably be expected. An attempt is also made to arrive at a knowledge of the elements involved whose improvement will effect the greatest gain. The supercharger overcomes the deficiency of the ordinary gas engine's serious loss of power at great altitudes, due to its inability to obtain sufficient oxygen for the combustion of a normal charge of gas which, in an engine of conventional design, is essential to the development of its maximum output.
Technical Paper

USE OF ALUMINUM IN PRESENT AND FUTURE MOTOR CARS

1920-01-01
200038
Although aluminum is the most abundant metal in the earth's crust, it was not until the early eighties that means were discovered for reducing it from its ores in such quantities and at such cost as to make it a commercial possibility. The world immediately began to find uses for this material. Two groups developed; one, assuming for aluminum properties that it did not possess, thought that it would in time replace all other metals; the other, which, reacting from the first-mentioned view due to failures and disappointments, thought it had little use. It was afterward realized that much research was necessary to make aluminum a really commercial metal. One of the main aims of the automobile engineer is to obtain lightness combined with proper strength. The paper deals with decreasing the weight of automobiles by more extended use of aluminum alloys. The physical properties of aluminum are described in considerable detail and its varied uses are enumerated.
Technical Paper

CURRENT DEVELOPMENT OF AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRIES

1920-01-01
200035
The paper surveys the economic and engineering aspects of the automotive industry, so that engineers can align themselves with its future development. Better performance and longer life due to improved design and materials distinguish the 1920 car from its predecessors. One of the healthiest signs in the industry is the uniform determination of practically every manufacturer to improve the quality of his product. The designer has been forced to extend himself in getting the highest possible output from the smallest possible units. This trend is very noticeable. Conditions relating to prices, the return to peace-time production, the potential demand for cars and the present supply, and the probable improvements in cars are then reviewed, the thought then passing to a somewhat detailed discussion of detachable-head engines.
Technical Paper

A TRACTOR ENGINE TEST

1920-01-01
200032
A four-cylinder 4 by 5-in. truck and tractor engine, designed for either kerosene or gasoline fuel and having the very low volumetric compression ratio of 3.36, was used. Only by suitable adjustments was it found possible to make it show a fuel consumption as low as 0.67 lb. per b.hp.-hr.; but with a slight variation in power and only a different carbureter adjustment the fuel consumption at 600 r.p.m. increased to about 1.2 lb., or 70 per cent, emphasizing the importance of knowing what constitutes the best engine adjustment and of disseminating such knowledge. The engine and its dimensions, the experimental apparatus and the method of testing are fully described and discussed, the results being presented in charts showing performance curves. These are described, analyzed and the results interpreted.
Technical Paper

ENGINE DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM POWER AND FUEL ECONOMY

1920-01-01
200058
Design factors are considered from the thermodynamic standpoint only, which excludes several factors affecting power and economy. The problem of air heating includes a consideration of its influence on pressure, the consequent lowering of pressure being counteracted to some extent by the resulting improvements in carburetion and distribution and by more rapid and complete combustion; the effects of delayed combustion, with a study of the thermodynamic conditions and possible improvements; and the results that are actually obtainable from lean and rich fuel mixtures. Fuel economy is difficult because its factors conflict with those of power. The benefit of the expansion of any elastic working medium to economy is emphasized. Charts from previous papers, showing the ratio of air to fuel by weight, are referred to and discussed, best economy being obtained with mixtures leaner than those giving maximum power.
Technical Paper

IMPACT TESTS ON TRUCKS

1920-01-01
200059
In investigating the forces that tend to break up and destroy roads, the most destructive of these being that of impact, the United States Bureau of Public Roads devised a method of receiving the impact of a truck on a small copper cylinder and determining its amount by measuring the deformation of the cylinder. The impact values are largely dependent upon the type and construction of the truck. Unsprung weights have a great influence upon the impact value of the blow on the road surface and a reverse influence upon the body of the truck; these effects are in two different directions. The present aim of the Bureau is to investigate this impact and the effect of the unsprung weight on the road. Most of the tests have been made on solid tires, a few have been made on worn solid tires and some on pneumatic tires. The Bureau intends to elaborate all of these tests, including different types of pneumatic tire, different unsprung weights and special wheels, such as cushion or spring wheels.
Technical Paper

FACTORS INVOLVED IN FUEL UTILIZATION

1920-01-01
200060
From a laboratory examination of the controlling relationships between carburetion and engine performance still in progress, the general conclusions so far reached include fuel metering characteristics, the physical structure of the charge, fuel combustion factors and details of engine design and manufacture. In every throttle-controlled engine, the variation in fuel metering for best utilization is inversely functional with the relative loading and with the compression ratio, but the nature of the fuel leaves these general relationships undisturbed. The physical structure of the charge influences largely the net engine performance and the order of variation of the best metering with change in load. Perfect homogeneity in the charge is theoretically desirable but entails losses in performance.
Technical Paper

INTAKE-MANIFOLD TEMPERATURES AND FUEL ECONOMY

1920-01-01
200054
Supplementing a “more miles per gallon” movement in 1919, a series of experiments outlined by the S. A. E. Committee on Utilization of Present Fuels was undertaken by the Bureau of Standards, in May, 1920, which included measurements of engine performance under conditions of both steady running and rapid acceleration with different temperatures of the intake charge secured by supplying heated air to the carbureter from a hot-air stove, by maintaining a uniformly heated intake manifold and by using a hot-spot manifold, fuel economy being determined for both part and full-throttle operation. A typical six-cylinder engine was used, having a two-port intake manifold with a minimum length of passage within the cylinder block, an exhaust manifold conveniently located for installing special exhaust openings, rather high peak-load speed and conventional general design.
Technical Paper

FUNDAMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING TRACTOR DESIGN

1920-01-01
200061
The farm tractor is finding itself among the most essential of mechanical agricultural devices; the industry is young, and controlling basic factors of design are not yet completely crystallized, nor has research had its proper share in the development. Some further factors of the author's earlier article on tractor plowing speeds2 are discussed in this paper. The earlier article dealt chiefly with plowing data on the assumption that there was delivered at the drawbar of the tractor a constant horsepower. This paper starts with a normal condition of a constant engine power which is to be delivered to the crankshaft under governor control for any of the travel speeds analyzed. The tractor is considered as powered by a given brake-horsepower engine, this power being transmitted through sets of gears in which the net bearing and gear efficiency is taken to be 73 per cent.
Technical Paper

SAVING FUEL WITH THE CARBURETER

1920-01-01
200056
Two series of tests were made in 1918; one to determine whether the mixture giving best economy and that giving maximum power is a constant quality for all conditions of speed and power output; the other to ascertain what effect changes in the temperature of the fuel-intake system have on the quality of the mixture which gives the maximum power and that which gives best economy. The standard United States ambulance four-cylinder engine was used for these tests, its carbureter having a primary air passage, a primary fuel-jet, an auxiliary air passage with an air-valve and a secondary fuel-jet, the manifold being cast integrally with the cylinder block and a curved riser conducting the fuel mixture from the carbureter to it. The testing methods and fuel consumption measurements are described.
Technical Paper

CARBURETION AND DISTRIBUTION OF LOW-GRADE FUELS

1920-01-01
200052
Continued lowering in the grade of fuel obtainable compels automotive engineers to produce engines that will utilize it with maximum economy. The manufacture of Pacific coast engine-distillate with an initial-distillation point of about 240 and an end-point of 480 deg. fahr. was abandoned by the principal oil companies early in 1920. Utilizing this fuel efficiently through its period of declining values forced advance solution of some fuel problems prior to a general lowering of grade of all automotive fuels.
Technical Paper

MOTOR-BUS TRANSPORTATION

1920-01-01
200053
Since the Fifth Avenue Coach Co. of New York is the largest successful company operating motor-buses in this country, the author gives a rather comprehensive description of this company's systems and methods, stating the three main divisions as being the engineering, mechanical and transportation departments, and presenting an organization chart. Departments concerned with finance, auditing, purchasing, publicity, claims and the like, which follow conventional lines, are not considered. The engineering, research, mechanical, repair and operating departments are then described in considerable detail. Six specific duties and responsibilities of the research department are stated and six divisions of the general procedure in carrying out overhauls for the operating department are enumerated. Regarding fuel economy, high gasoline averages from the company's standpoint mean economy, well-designed and maintained equipment, and skilled and contented operatives.
Technical Paper

MARINE HEAVY-OIL ENGINE INSTALLATION PRACTICE AND DEVELOPMENT POSSIBILITIES

1920-01-01
200046
The undisputed economy of the Diesel-type engine using heavy fuel oil is recognized, as no other power-generating unit of today shows better thermal efficiency. It is the result of the direct application of fuel in working cylinders. Transmission processes, such as the burning of fuel under a boiler to produce a working agent which must be carried to the prime mover, are less economical. The various factors which enter into a comparison between steam and heavy-oil installations are illustrated. The subject is treated in a more or less elementary manner. The diagrams and sketches are intended to explain the working principles of such examples of two and four-cycle engines as are now in actual operation in cargo ships, these being of the single-acting type. Double-acting and opposed-piston-type engines have been built and are being tried out. The working processes of two-cycle and four-cycle engines are illustrated and described in some detail, inclusive of critical comment.
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