Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 13 of 13
Technical Paper

Volume Morphing to Compensate Stamping Springback

2009-04-20
2009-01-0982
A common occurrence in computer aided design is the need to make changes to an existing CAD model to compensate for shape changes which occur during a manufacturing process. For instance, finite element analysis of die forming or die tryout results may indicate that a stamped panel springs back after the press line operation so that the final shape is different from nominal shape. Springback may be corrected by redesigning the die face so that the stamped panel springs back to the nominal shape. When done manually, this redesign process is often time consuming and expensive. This article presents a computer program, FESHAPE, that reshapes the CAD or finite element mesh models automatically. The method is based on the technique of volume morphing pioneered by Sederberg and Parry [Sederberg 1986] and refined in [Sarraga 2004]. Volume morphing reshapes regions of surfaces or meshes by reshaping volumes containing those regions.
Technical Paper

2006 Corvette Z06 Carbon Fiber Fender- Engineering, Design, and Material Selection Considerations

2005-04-11
2005-01-0468
General Motor's Corvette product engineering was given the challenge to find mass reduction opportunities on the painted body panels of the C6 Z06 through the utilization of carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFRC). The successful implementation of a carbon fiber hood on the 2004 C5 Commemorative Edition Z06 Corvette was the springboard for Corvette Team's appetite for a more extensive application of CFRC on the C6 Z06 model. Fenders were identified as the best application for the technology given their location on the front of the vehicle and the amount of mass saved. The C6 Z06 CFRC fenders provide 6kg reduction of vehicle mass as compared to the smaller RRIM fenders used on the Coupe and Convertible models.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Crush Performance of A Hat Section Component Using Dual Phase and Martensitic Steels

2005-04-11
2005-01-0837
Drop tower axial crush testing was performed on hat section samples of various steel grades ranging in minimum tensile strength from 410 MPa to 1300 MPa. It was demonstrated that the energy absorption capability increases with the tensile strength of the steel. However, steels of very high strength, greater than 980 MPa tensile strength, exhibited a greater tendency for weld button pullout or material fracture, and thus limited energy the absorption capability. The effect of the closeout plate and the yield strength of the steel on energy absorption were also investigated. FEA simulations were performed and correlated to the experimental results. A flow stress based material criterion is introduced based on the analytical approach to compare the crush performance of steels.
Technical Paper

Full Vehicle Finite Element Model 4-Post Durability Analysis

2005-04-11
2005-01-1402
4-Post durability test simulations using a nonlinear FEA model have been executed by engineers responsible for structural durability performance and validation. An integrated Body and Chassis, full FEA model has been used. All components of the test load input were screened and only the most damaging events were incorporated in the simulation. These events included the Potholes, Belgian Block Tracks, Chatter Bump Stops, Twist Ditches, and Driveway Ramps. The CAE technology Virtual Proving Ground (eta/VPG®*) was used to model the full system and the 4-Post test fixtures. The nonlinear dynamic FE solver LS-DYNA** was used in this analysis. The fatigue damage of each selected event was calculated separately and then added together according to the test schedule. Due to the lack of stress/strain information from hardware test, only the analyzed fatigue damage results of the baseline model were scaled to correlate with physical test data.
Technical Paper

Obtaining the Coupled Response of Structures from their Mass Loaded Forced Response

2004-03-08
2004-01-0759
This paper outlines a newly developed method for predicting the coupled response of structures from their uncoupled forced responses without having to know the forces acting on such structures. It involves computing the forced response of originally uncoupled structures with several mass loadings at a potential coupling point. The response data obtained from such computations is then used to predict the coupled response. The theory for discrete linear systems is outlined in the paper and a numerical example is given to demonstrate the validity, advantages and limitations of the method. The method is primarily devised to obtain coupled response of linear dynamic systems from independent and uncoupled analytical simulations. Its application significantly decreases computation time by reducing the simulation model size and is excellent for “what if” scenarios where a large number of simulations would otherwise be necessary.
Technical Paper

Discussion of Fatigue Analysis Techniques in Automotive Applications

2004-03-08
2004-01-0626
This paper is targeted to engineers who are involved in predicting fatigue life using either the strain-life approach or the stress-life approach. However, more emphasis is given to the strain-life approach, which is commonly used for fatigue life analysis in the ground vehicle industry. It attempts to discuss, modify and extend approaches in fatigue analysis, so they are best suited for structural durability engineers. Fatigue analysis requires the use of material fatigue properties, stress or strain results obtained from finite element analyses or measurements, and load data obtained from multi-body dynamic analysis or road load data acquisition. This paper examines the effects of these variables in predicting fatigue life. Various mean stress corrections, along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Different stress/strain combinations such as signed von Mises, and signed Tresca are examined. Also, advanced methods such as Fatemi-Socie and Bannantine are discussed.
Technical Paper

Energy Flow Method for Mid-Frequency Vibration Analysis

2003-05-05
2003-01-1454
The Energy Flow Method (EFM), which is based on a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model and its modal frequency response solution is presented in this paper. The energy and power for each subsystem are the primary response and excitation parameters as in the Statistical Energy analysis (SEA) method. This gives a broad-brush prediction by averaging over both frequency and spatial domain. This prediction is useful when uncertainties exist in the model. The FEA model is used to capture the geometry detail, which is critical in mid-frequency vibration. As an example, a five-plate system is studied using various methods, including traditional FEA, SEA and EFM. The last one has been implemented in MSC/NASTRAN. A discussion is given to understand the limitation of SEA and FEA application in mid frequency response.
Technical Paper

A FEA based Procedure to Perform Statistical Energy Analysis

2003-05-05
2003-01-1553
A technique which uses Finite Element Analysis (FEA) to derive important parameters involved in SEA (Statistical Energy Analysis) is discussed. Application of the method to a variety of structures has yielded good correlation with experimentally generated results. SEA parameters including Coupling Loss Factors (CLFs), modal densities, and subsystem equivalent masses were obtained. The technique has the advantage of incorporating structural detail to enhance SEA predictions at lower frequencies where global modes are important, and it can be applied early in the design phase since no hardware is required. With this study, SEA is more readily applied to structure-borne noise problems in vehicles.
Technical Paper

Vibration Modeling and Correlation of Driveline Boom for TFWD/AWD Crossover Vehicles

2003-05-05
2003-01-1495
Reducing the high cost of hardware testing with analytical methods has been highly accelerated in the automotive industry. This paper discusses an analytical model to simulate the driveline boom test for the transverse engine with all wheel drive configuration on a front-wheel drive base (TFWD/AWD). Driveline boom caused by engine firing frequency that excites the bending mode of the propeller shaft becomes a noise and vibration issue for the design of TFWD/AWD driveline. The major source of vibrations and noise under the investigation in this paper is the dominant 3rd order engine torque pulse disturbance that excites the bending of the propeller shaft, the bending of the powertrain and possible the bending of the rear halfshaft. All other excitation sources in this powertrain for a 60° V6 engine with a pushrod type valvetrain are assessed and NVH issues are also considered in this transient dynamic model.
Technical Paper

Modeling of Strain Rate Effects in Automotive Impact

2003-03-03
2003-01-1383
This paper deals with the effects of various approaches for modeling of strain rate effects for mild and high strength steels (HSS) on impact simulations. The material modeling is discussed in the context of the finite element method (FEM) modeling of progressive crush of energy absorbing automotive components. The characteristics of piecewise linear plasticity strain rate dependent material model are analyzed and various submodels for modeling of impact response of steel structures are investigated. The paper reports on the ranges of strains and strain rates that are calculated in typical FEM models for tube crush and their dependence on the material modeling approaches employed. The models are compared to the experimental results from drop tower tests.
Technical Paper

Coupling Meshfree Methods with Reliability Analysis Techniques

2003-03-03
2003-01-0145
This report describes the use of meshfree methods for response and design sensitivity calculations within structural reliability analysis when geometric shape is a random variable. Brief descriptions of meshfree methods and advanced probabilistic methods are provided. An existing interface between the probabilistic analysis and traditional finite element method is modified to allow the use of meshfree methods for response and design sensitivity calculations within the probabilistic analysis routine. Two examples that treat design shape as a random variable are presented to assess the accuracy and use of meshfree methods for reliability analysis.
Technical Paper

Modeling and Correlation of Driveshaft Whirl Dynamics for RWD Sport Utility Vehicles

2001-04-30
2001-01-1503
High interest is expressed in using analytical models to eliminate costly driveline tests used to determine the stresses produced in the driveshaft and driveline during resonant operating conditions. This paper discusses an analytical model to simulate the driveline-bending integrity, test procedure. Three major subsystems are modeled in this analytical approach, namely powertrain, rear axle, and driveshaft. Imbalance masses were added on the driveshaft to induce the whirl motion of the driveshaft. The combination of nonlinear Multi-body System Simulation (MSS) and linear Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in the time domain was employed for the evaluation of the dynamic interaction between several parts.
Technical Paper

Minimization of Error for Enforced Motion in FEM

2001-04-30
2001-01-1409
Several methods are currently used to enforce motion in different types of noise and vibration models. Experimentally based FRF models often use a matrix inversion technique to enforce motion. In finite element models, the large mass method is one that is very commonly used. A literature review has shown few guidelines for determining the size of these large masses. In this paper, the relationship between the matrix inversion technique and the large mass method is derived. From this relationship, conditions necessary for these large mass FEM models to converge to the same answers as the matrix inversion technique are derived. These conditions are then used to develop a criterion for determining a smallest possible large mass. Results from a simple model are presented to demonstrate the criterion.
X