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Technical Paper

An Improved Seating Accommodation Model for Older and Younger Drivers

2016-04-05
2016-01-1444
The research objective was to measure and understand the preferred seat position of older drivers and younger drivers within their personal vehicles to influence recommended practices and meet the increased safety needs of all drivers. Improper selection of driver’s seat position may impact safety during a crash event and affect one’s capacity to see the roadway and reach the vehicle’s controls, such as steering wheel, accelerator, brake, clutch, and gear selector lever. Because of the stature changes associated with ageing and the fact that stature is normally distributed for both males and females, it was hypothesized that the SAE J4004 linear regression would be improved with the inclusion of gender and age terms that would provide a more accurate model to predict the seat track position of older drivers. Participants included 97 older drivers over the age of 60 and 20 younger drivers between the ages of 30 to 39.
Book

Composites in Automotive Applications set

2015-09-10
This set consists of three books, Design of Automotive Composites, CAE Design and Failure Analysis of Automotive Composites, and Biocomposites in Automotive Applications all developed by Dr. Charles Lu and Dr. Srikanth Pilla. Design of Automotive Composites reports successful designs of automotive composites occurred recently in this arena, CAE Design and Failure Analysis of Automotive Composites focuses on the latest use of CAE (Computer-Aided Engineering) methods in design and failure analysis of composite materials and structures, and Biocomposites in Automotive Applications, focuses on processing and characterization of biocomposites, their application in the automotive industry and new perspectives on automotive sustainability. Together, they are a focused collection providing the reader with must-read technical papers, hand-picked by the editors, supporting the growing importance of the use of composites in the ground vehicle industry. Dr. Charles Lu is H.E.
Technical Paper

Driver Models for Virtual Testing of Automotive Run-Off-Road and Recovery Control Systems and Education Strategies

2015-04-14
2015-01-0256
Driver modeling is essential to both vehicle design and control unit development. It can improve the understanding of human driving behavior and decrease the cost and risk of vehicle system verification and validation. In this paper, three driver models were implemented to simulate the behavior of drivers subject to a run-off-road recovery event. Target path planning, pursuit behavior, compensate behavior, physical limitations, and neuromuscular modeling were taken into consideration in the feedforward/feedback driver model. A transfer function driver model and a cost function based driver model from a popular vehicle simulation software were also simulated and a comparison of these three models was made. The feedforward/feedback driver model exhibited the best balance of performance with smallest overshoot (0.226m), medium settling time (1.20s) and recovery time (4.30s).
Technical Paper

Development and Evaluation of a Portable Driving Performance and Analysis System for Education Purposes

2015-04-14
2015-01-0259
According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), motor collisions account for nearly 2.4 million injuries and 37 thousand fatalities each year in the United States. A great deal of research has been done in the area of vehicular safety, but very little has been completed to ensure licensed drivers are properly trained. Given the inherent risks in driving itself, the test for licensure should be uniform and consistent. To address this issue, an inexpensive, portable data acquisition and analysis system has been developed for the evaluation of driver performance. A study was performed to evaluate the system, and each participant was given a normalized driver rating. The average driver rating was μ=55.6, with a standard deviation of σ=12.3. All but 3 drivers fell into the so-called “Target Zone”, defined by a Driver Rating of μ± 1σ.
Technical Paper

A Dynamic Driving Course for Military Personnel -Curriculum and Assessment Results

2015-04-14
2015-01-0130
Driving skills and driving experience develop differently between a civilian and a military service member. Since 2000, the Department of Defense reports that two-thirds of non-related to war fatalities among active duty service members were due to transportation-related incidents. In addition, vehicle crashes are the leading non-related to war cause of both fatalities and serious injuries among active duty Marines. A pilot safe driving program for Marines was jointly developed by the Richard Petty Driving Experience and Clemson University Automotive Safety Research Institute. The pilot program includes four modules based on leading causes of vehicle crashes, and uses classroom and behind the wheel components to improve and reinforce safe driving skills and knowledge. The assessment results of this pilot program conducted with 192 Marines in September 2011 at Camp LeJeune, NC are presented and discussed.
Technical Paper

Automotive Simulator Based Novice Driver Training with Assessment

2011-04-12
2011-01-1011
Motor vehicle crashes involving novice drivers are significantly higher than matured driver incidents as reported by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Fatality Analysis Reporting System (NHTSA-FARS). Researchers around the world and the United States are focused on how to decrease crashes for this driver demographic. Novice drivers usually complete driver education classes as a pre-requisite for full licensure to improve overall knowledge and safety. However, compiled statistics still indicate a need for more in-depth training after full licensure. An opportunity exists to supplement in-vehicle driving with focused learning modules using automotive simulators. In this paper, a training program for “Following Etiquette” and “Situational Awareness” was developed to introduce these key driving techniques and to complete a feasibility study using a driving simulator as the training tool.
Technical Paper

Finite Element Simulation of Ring Rolling Process

2010-04-12
2010-01-0270
Three-dimensional simulation has become an indispensable approach to develop improved understanding of ring rolling technology, with validity as the basic requirement of the ring rolling simulation. Cold ring rolling is simple conceptually, however complex to analyze as the metal forming process is subject to coupled effects with multiple influencing factors such as sizes of rolls and ring blank, form geometry, material, process parameters, and frictional effects. Investigating the coupled thermal and plastic deformation behavior (the plastic deformation state and its development) in the deformation zone during the process is significant for predicting metal flow in order to control the geometric and tensile residual stress quality of deformed rings, and to provide for cycle time optimization of the cold ring rolling process.
Journal Article

Hydrostatic Wheel Drives for Vehicle Stability Control

2010-04-12
2010-01-0105
Hydrostatic (hydraulic hybrid) drives have demonstrated energy efficiency and emissions reduction benefits. This paper investigates the potential of an independent hydrostatic wheel drive system for implementing a traction-based vehicle lateral stability control system. The system allows an upper level vehicle stability controller to produce a desired corrective yaw moment via a differential distribution of torque to the independent wheel motors. In cornering maneuvers that require braking on any one wheel of the vehicle, the motors can be operated as pumps for re-generating energy into an on-board accumulator. This approach avoids or reduces activation of the friction brakes, thereby reducing energy waste as heat in the brake pads and offering potential savings in brake maintenance costs. For this study, a model of a 4×4 hydrostatic independent wheel drive system is constructed in a causal and modular fashion and is coupled to a 7 DOF vehicle handling dynamics model.
Technical Paper

Roll Stability Control for Torsionally Compliant Vehicles

2010-04-12
2010-01-0102
Rollover prevention is now part of complete vehicle stability control systems for many vehicles. Given that rollover is predominantly associated with vehicles with high centers of gravity, the targeted vehicles for rollover protection include medium and heavy duty commercial vehicles. Unfortunately, the chassis designs of these vehicles are often so compliant in torsion that the ends of the vehicles may have significantly different roll responses at any given time. The potential need to assess and correct for the roll behavior of the front and rear ends of the vehicle is the subject of this paper. Most rollover mitigation research to date has used rigid chassis assumptions in modeling the vehicle. This paper deals with the roll control of vehicles with torsionally flexible chassis based on a yaw-correction system.
Technical Paper

Investigation of the Machining of Titanium Components for Lightweight Vehicles

2010-04-12
2010-01-0022
Due to titanium's excellent strength-to-weight ratio and high corrosion resistance, titanium and its alloys have great potential to reduce energy usage in vehicles through a reduction in vehicle mass. The mass of a road vehicle is directly related to its energy consumption through inertial requirements and tire rolling resistance losses. However, when considering the manufacture of titanium automotive components, the machinability is poor, thus increasing processing cost through a trade-off between extended cycle time (labor cost) or increased tool wear (tooling cost). This fact has classified titanium as a “difficult-to-machine” material and consequently, titanium has been traditionally used for application areas having a comparatively higher end product cost such as in aerospace applications, the automotive racing segment, etc., as opposed to the consumer automotive segment.
Technical Paper

Development and Qualitative Testing of Traction Concepts as an Undergraduate Experience

2010-04-12
2010-01-0312
Recent research at Clemson University has focused on the development of an advanced non-pneumatic, non-elastomeric lunar wheel for NASA with superior traction. This paper reports on several concepts for tread materials and geometries that have been explored for tire-on-sand use. Specifically, fourteen concepts, involving the use of metal meshes, textile carpet materials, soft grousers, foams, and screens, were physically tested in an on-vehicle environment. Prototypes for each concept and formal test procedures to quantify traction were developed. This paper presents the results of the tests for several different concepts and the comparison between the concepts that were developed. Students developed their own testing environment through which these test procedures are implemented, an inclined hill 45 ft. in length and 8 ft. wide will approximately 6 inches deep filled with sand.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Chassis Flexibility on Roll Stiffness of a Winston Cup Race Car

1998-11-16
983051
Predictable handling of a racecar may be achieved by tailoring chassis stiffness so that roll stiffness between sprung and unsprung masses are due almost entirely to the suspension. In this work, the effects of overall chassis flexibility on roll stiffness and wheel camber response, will be determined using a finite element model (FEM) of a Winston Cup racecar chassis and suspension. The FEM of the chassis/suspension is built from an assembly of beam and shell elements using geometry measured from a typical Winston cup race configuration. Care has been taken to model internal constraints between degrees-of-freedom (DOF) at suspension to chassis connections, e.g. t ball and pin joints and internal releases. To validate the model, the change in wheel loads due to an applied jacking force that rolls the chassis agrees closely with measured data.
Technical Paper

Thermal Optimization of the ECS on an Advanced Aircraft with an Emphasis on System Efficiency and Design Methodology

1997-06-18
971241
Two methods for analyzing and evaluating the environmental control system on an advanced aircraft as described in this paper include the conventional first law energy conservation technique and the second law entropy generation minimization technique. Simplified analytical models of the ECS are developed for each method and compared to determine the validity of using the latter to facilitate the design process in optimizing the overall system for a minimum gross takeoff weight (GTW). Preliminary results have illustrated the importance of taking into account system optimization based on system (or component) efficiency. For instance, even though different values were obtained for the rate of entropy generation, the second law analysis of a shell-in-tube heat exchanger led to an optimum tube diameter of 0.12 in (3.05 mm) when both R-12 and R-114 were used as the refrigerant in the vapor cycle.
Technical Paper

Advanced Computational Methods for Predicting Flow Losses in Intake Regions of Diesel Engines

1997-02-24
970639
A computational methodology has been developed for loss prediction in intake regions of internal combustion engines. The methodology consists of a hierarchy of four major tasks: (1) proper computational modeling of flow physics; (2) exact geometry and high quality and generation; (3) discretization schemes for low numerical viscosity; and (4) higher order turbulence modeling. Only when these four tasks are dealt with properly will a computational simulation yield consistently accurate results. This methodology, which is has been successfully tested and validated against benchmark quality data for a wide variety of complex 2-D and 3-D laminar and turbulent flow situations, is applied here to a loss prediction problem from industry. Total pressure losses in the intake region (inlet duct, manifold, plenum, ports, valves, and cylinder) of a Caterpillar diesel engine are predicted computationally and compared to experimental data.
Technical Paper

Clemson University Motorsports Engineering Program

1996-12-01
962496
The newly initiated Clemson Motorsports Engineering Program, housed in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, provides unique educational opportunities to our students combining classroom engineering education, research, and race team experience. Additionally, the research and service projects conducted provide valuable information to race teams and companies in the automotive industry as well as involving students in both applied technology development and fundamental engineering activities. This paper describes the current activities and structure of the program together with our view for future development.
Technical Paper

Procedure for the Characterization of Friction in Automobile Power Steering Systems

1996-02-01
960933
In developing a nonlinear steering system model for vehicle simulation, it was determined that proper inclusion of system friction is necessary to correctly predict steering wheel torque response in on-center driving using simulation models. A method to characterize the inherent friction behavior for a given steering gear has been developed and performed on two types of power steering gears: a recirculating ball gear and a rack-and-pinion gear. During this research it was discovered that levels of static and dynamic friction can differ widely for these two types. Therefore this characterization procedure provides a method to ascertain both static and dynamic friction levels. The results from these tests show that friction levels can depend on steering gear input shaft position, steering gear input angular velocity and steering gear loading conditions.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of the Effects of Roll Control on Handling and Stability of Passenger Vehicles During Severe Lane Change Maneuvers

1995-02-01
950305
The control of body roll on passenger vehicles can be used as a tool for controlling the “weight shift” that occurs during maneuvering. Distribution of load to the tires will determine the ability of each tire to generate lateral forces required for the maneuver and thus will significantly affect handling. In this investigation, the effects on weight shift and hence, on handling, of total roll stiffness, front to rear roll stiffness distribution, total roll damping, and roll damping distribution were examined. These results were then used to guide the development and analysis of several roll control algorithms. The results of the investigation indicate that roll control can be effective in improving handling and stability. However, simulation of the control algorithms showed that the controllers must be specifically tuned for the vehicle in which they are to be used.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Roll Control for Passenger Cars during Emergency Maneuvers

1994-03-01
940224
A nonlinear eight degree of freedom vehicle model has been used to examine the effects of roll stiffness on handling and performance. In addition, various control strategies have been devised which vary the total roll couple distribution in order to improve cornering capability and stopping distance. Of all cases tested, a controller which varies the total roll stiffness based on roll angle feedback, and continuously updates the roll couple distribution as a function of steering wheel angle, braking input, and the total roll stiffness, yields the greatest improvements in collision avoidance.
Technical Paper

An Investigation of the Pulse Steer Method for Determining Automobile Handling Qualities

1993-03-01
930829
The use of pulse steering tests for assessment of handling qualities was investigated using a simulation of a comprehensive, nonlinear four wheel model of an automobile. Evaluations were conducted using frequency response functions of yaw rate and lateral acceleration obtained by FFT processing of the simulated response. In addition, as suggested by the work of Mimuro et al [1], four parameters (steady state yaw rate gain, yaw rate natural frequency and damping ratio, and lateral acceleration phase lag at 1 Hz) that characterize these response functions were also obtained by curve fitting techniques. The effects on accuracy of the response functions and the four parameters of variations in pulse shape, duration, and magnitude were investigated. Results from the simulated pulse steer test were compared with those from simulated swept sine steering tests.
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