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Journal Article

Experiments and Modeling of Adaptive Injection Strategies (AIS) in Low Emissions Diesel Engines

2009-04-20
2009-01-0127
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) has been shown as a promising technique for simultaneous NOx and soot reduction while maintaining diesel-like efficiency. Although HCCI has been shown to yield very low emissions levels, spray-wall impingement and high pressure rise rates can be problematic due to the early injection timings necessary for certain HCCI operations. To address spray-wall impingement, an Adaptive Injection Strategy (AIS) was employed. This strategy uses multiple pulses at both low and high injection pressures to prepare an optimal in-cylinder mixture. A unique Variable Pressure Pulse (VPP) was developed to investigate the AIS concept experimentally. The VPP has the capability of delivering multiple injections at both low and high injection pressures (∼100 bar and ∼1000 bar respectively) through a single injector in the same engine cycle. Comparisons were made between model predictions and engine experiments using the VPP system.
Technical Paper

A Study of the Effects of High EGR, High Equivalence Ratio, and Mixing Time on Emissions Levels in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine for PCCI Combustion

2006-04-03
2006-01-0026
Experiments were performed on a single-cylinder heavy-duty Caterpillar SCOTE 3401E engine at high speed (1737 rev/min) and loads up to 60% of full load for fully Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. The engine was equipped with a high pressure (150 MPa) Caterpillar 300B HEUI fuel injection system. The engine was run with EGR levels up to 75% and with equivalence ratios up to 0.95. These experiments resulted in compliance of NOx and PM emissions to 2010 emissions mandates levels up to the tested load. The set of experiments also demonstrated the importance of cylinder charge preparation by way of optimized start-of-combustion timing for sufficient in-cylinder mixing. It was found that increased EGR rates, even with the correspondingly increased equivalence ratios, increase mixing time and substantially decrease PM emissions.
Technical Paper

An Experimental Investigation of Partially Premixed Combustion Strategies Using Multiple Injections in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

2006-04-03
2006-01-0917
Optimizations were performed on a single-cylinder heavy-duty Caterpillar SCOTE 3401E engine for NOx, PM and BSFC reductions. The engine was equipped with a Caterpillar 300B HEUI fuel injection system capable of up to four injections with timings from 90 BTDC to 90 ATDC. The engine was operated at a medium load (57%), high speed (1737 rev/min) operation point. A micro-genetic algorithm was utilized to optimize a hybrid, double-injection strategy, which incorporated an early, premixed pilot injection with a late main injection. The fuel injection parameters, intake boost pressure, and EGR were considered in the optimization. The optimization produced a parameter set that met the 2007 and 2010 PM emissions mandate of 0.0134 g/kW-hr, and was within the 1.5x not to exceed NOx + HC mandate of 2.694 g/kW-hr. Following the optimization exercise, further parametric interaction studies were performed to reveal the underlying interactions and phenomena.
Technical Paper

Modeling the Effects of EGR and Injection Pressure on Soot Formation in a High-Speed Direct-Injection (HSDI) Diesel Engine Using a Multi-Step Phenomenological Soot Model

2005-04-11
2005-01-0121
Low-temperature combustion concepts that utilize cooled EGR, early/retarded injection, high swirl ratios, and modest compression ratios have recently received considerable attention. To understand the combustion and, in particular, the soot formation process under these operating conditions, a modeling study was carried out using the KIVA-3V code with an improved phenomenological soot model. This multi-step soot model includes particle inception, surface growth, surface oxidation, and particle coagulation. Additional models include a piston-ring crevice model, the KH/RT spray breakup model, a droplet wall impingement model, a wall heat transfer model, and the RNG k-ε turbulence model. The Shell model was used to simulate the ignition process, and a laminar-and-turbulent characteristic time combustion model was used for the post-ignition combustion process.
Technical Paper

Experimental Optimization of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Using Automated Genetic Algorithms

2002-03-04
2002-01-0960
A micro-genetic algorithm (μGA) optimization method was applied to a heavy-duty, direct-injected diesel engine via an automated test bed system. The goal of this application was to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of automated optimization experiments. With the genetic algorithm, no user input was required other than the factors of interest and their allowable ranges. This means that once the routine was initiated, it was essentially run undisturbed until a preset objective level was reached or a preset number of generations had been run. The automated μGA was successfully demonstrated at all points of the six-mode transient cycle simulation, excluding idle. To accomplish the automated experiments, an automated testing system was developed around a Caterpillar single-cylinder diesel engine.
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