Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 18 of 18
Journal Article

Passive TWC+SCR Systems for Satisfying Tier 2, Bin 2 Emission Standards on Lean-Burn Gasoline Engines

2015-04-14
2015-01-1004
A laboratory study was performed to assess the potential capability of passive TWC+SCR systems to satisfy the Tier 2, Bin 2 emission standards for lean-burn gasoline applications. In this system, the TWC generates the NH3 for the SCR catalyst from the feedgas NOx during rich operation. Therefore, this approach benefits from high feedgas NOx during rich operation to generate high levels of NH3 quickly and low feedgas NOx during lean operation for a low rate of NH3 consumption. It was assumed that the exhaust system needed to include a close-coupled (CC) TWC, an underbody (U/B) TWC, and an U/B SCR converter to satisfy the emission standards during the FTP and US06 tests while allowing lean operation for improved fuel economy during select driving conditions. Target levels for HC, CO, and NOx during lean/rich cycling were established. With a 30 s lean/10 s rich cycle and 200 ppm NO lean, 1500 ppm NO rich and the equivalent of 3.3 L of SCR volume were required to satisfy the NOx target.
Journal Article

TWC+LNT/SCR Systems for Satisfying Tier 2, Bin 2 Emission Standards on Lean-Burn Gasoline Engines

2015-04-14
2015-01-1006
A laboratory study was performed to assess the potential capability of TWC+LNT/SCR systems to satisfy the Tier 2, Bin 2 emission standards for lean-burn gasoline applications. It was assumed that the exhaust system would need a close-coupled (CC) TWC, an underbody (U/B) TWC, and a third U/B LNT/SCR converter to satisfy the emission standards on the FTP and US06 tests while allowing lean operation for improved fuel economy during select driving conditions. Target levels for HC, CO, and NOx during lean/rich cycling were established. Sizing studies were performed to determine the minimum LNT/SCR volume needed to satisfy the NOx target. The ability of the TWC to oxidize the HC during rich operation through steam reforming was crucial for satisfying the HC target.
Journal Article

Effect of Unburned Methyl Esters on the NOx Conversion of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

2009-11-02
2009-01-2777
Engine and flow reactor experiments were conducted to determine the impact of biodiesel relative to ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on inhibition of the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reaction over an Fe-zeolite catalyst. Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts have the ability to adsorb and store unburned hydrocarbons (HC) at temperatures below 300°C. These stored HCs inhibit or block NOx-ammonia reaction sites at low temperatures. Although biodiesel is not a hydrocarbon, similar effects are anticipated for unburned biodiesel and its organic combustion products. Flow reactor experiments indicate that in the absence of exposure to HC or B100, NOx conversion begins at between 100° and 200°C. When exposure to unburned fuel occurs at higher temperatures (250°-400°C), the catalyst is able to adsorb a greater mass of biodiesel than of ULSD. Experiments show that when the catalyst is masked with ULSD, NOx conversion is inhibited until it is heated to 400°C.
Technical Paper

Laboratory Study to Determine Impact of Na and K Exposure on the Durability of DOC and SCR Catalyst Formulations

2009-11-02
2009-01-2823
A laboratory flow reactor study was utilized to determine the durability impact of alkali metal (Na and K) exposure on three Pt/Pd-based diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC), two vanadium-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts, and two Cu/zeolite-based SCR catalysts. All catalyst samples were contaminated by direct deposition of Na or K by an incipient wetness technique. The activity impact on the contaminated DOCs was accomplished by evaluating for changes in CO and HC light-off. The activity impact on the contaminated SCR catalysts was accomplished by evaluating for changes in the Standard SCR Reaction, the Fast SCR Reaction, the Ammonia Oxidation Reaction, and the Ammonia Storage Capacity. Contamination levels of 3.0 wt% Na was found to have a higher negative impact on Pt-based and zeolite containing DOCs for T-50 CO and HC light-off.
Technical Paper

Development of Emission Transfer Functions for Predicting the Deterioration of a Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst

2009-04-20
2009-01-1282
Urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts have the capability to deliver the high NOx conversion efficiencies required for future emission standards. However, the potential for the occasional over-temperature can lead to the irreversible deactivation of the SCR catalyst. On-board diagnostics (OBD) compliance requires monitoring of the SCR function to make sure it is operating properly. Initially, SCR catalyst performance metrics such as NOx conversion, NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage capacity, and BET surface area are within normal limits. However, these features degrade with high temperature aging. In this work, a laboratory flow reactor was utilized to determine the impact on these performance metrics as a function of aging condition. Upon the completion of a full time-at-temperature durability study, four performance criteria were established to help determine a likely SCR failure.
Technical Paper

Cu/Zeolite SCR on High Porosity Filters: Laboratory and Engine Performance Evaluations

2009-04-20
2009-01-0897
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is expected to be used extensively in the U.S. for diesel vehicle NOx control. Much progress has been made on improving performance and reducing complexity of SCR systems for vehicles in the past several years. SCR system complexity can be reduced further by implementation of SCR-coated diesel particulate filters (SCRFs). In this system, a high porosity (> 50%) filter substrate is coated with an SCR formulation, ideally in the pores of the filter walls, so that the DPF and SCR functions can be combined into a single catalyst. Two state-of-the-art Cu/zeolite SCR formulations and three types of high porosity filter substrates were included in this study. Laboratory and engine-dynamometer tests were performed to measure NOx conversion under a variety of conditions to assess the impact of ammonia oxidation, inlet NO2/NOx ratio, ammonia/NOx ratio, oxygen level, space velocity, soot loading, and ammonia loading level.
Journal Article

Laboratory Study of Soot, Propylene, and Diesel Fuel Impact on Zeolite-Based SCR Filter Catalysts

2009-04-20
2009-01-0903
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been designed to reduce NOx with the assistance of an ammonia-based reductant. Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) have been designed to trap and eventually oxidize particulate matter (PM). Combining the SCR function within the wall of a high porosity particulate filter substrate has the potential to reduce the overall complexity of the aftertreatment system while maintaining the required NOx and PM performance. The concept, termed Selective Catalytic Reduction Filter (SCRF) was studied using a synthetic gas bench to determine the NOx conversion robustness from soot, coke, and hydrocarbon deposition. Soot deposition, coke derived from propylene exposure, and coke derived from diesel fuel exposure negatively affected the NOx conversion. The type of soot and/or coke responsible for the inhibited NOx conversion did not contribute to the SCRF backpressure.
Technical Paper

Impact of a Cu-zeolite SCR Catalyst on the Performance of a Diesel LNT+SCR System

2009-04-20
2009-01-0285
Advanced Cu-zeolite based SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst technologies were evaluated in a laboratory reactor as a component of a diesel LNT (lean NOx trap) plus in-situ SCR system (i.e., NH3 generation over the LNT vs injection via urea). New-generation LNT formulations, with lower desulfation temperatures and improved durability characteristics relative to previous LNTs, were also evaluated. The combined new-generation LNT+Cu-zeolite SCR systems showed a much wider temperature window of high NOx conversion compared to either LNT catalysts alone or LNT+SCR systems utilizing Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts. The new-generation Cu-zeolite SCR catalysts retained high activity even after repeated exposure to high-temperature rich DeSOx conditions in a laboratory 3-mode aging cycle simulating 120,000 mile vehicle driving.
Journal Article

Impact and Prevention of Ultra-Low Contamination of Platinum Group Metals on SCR Catalysts Due to DOC Design

2009-04-20
2009-01-0627
Diesel aftertreatment systems configured with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream of an urea selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst run the risk of precious metal contamination. During active diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration events, the DOC bed temperature can reach up to 850°C. Under these conditions, precious metal (especially Pt) can be volatized and then deposited on a downstream SCR catalyst. In this paper, the impact of ultra-low contamination of platinum group metals (PGM) on the SCR catalyst was studied. A method based on precious metal volatilization of a Pt-rich DOC at 850°C and under lean gas conditions was employed to contaminate downstream FeSCR and CuSCR formulations. The contamination resulted in poor NOx conversion (via NOx remake) and excessive N2O formation. The precious metal volatilization method was employed to screen various Pt/Pd based DOCs to avoid contamination of the downstream FeSCR.
Technical Paper

Cold Start Performance and Enhanced Thermal Durability of Vanadium SCR Catalysts

2009-04-20
2009-01-0625
For diesel applications, cold start accounts for a large amount of the total NOx emissions during a typical Federal Test Procedure (FTP) for light-duty vehicles and is a key focus for reducing NOx emissions. A common form of diesel NOx aftertreatment is selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology. For cold start NOx improvement, the SCR catalyst would be best located as the first catalyst in the aftertreatment system; however, engine-out hydrocarbons and no diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream to generate an exotherm for desulfation can result in degraded SCR catalyst performance. Recent advances in vanadia-based SCR (V-SCR) catalyst technology have shown better low temperature NOx performance and improved thermal durability. Three V-SCR technologies were tested for their thermal durability and low-temperature NOx performance, and after 600°C aging, one technology showed low-temperature performance on par with state-of-the-art copper-zeolite SCR (Cu-SCR) technology.
Journal Article

Detection, Origin and Effect of Ultra-Low Platinum Contamination on Diesel-SCR Catalysts

2008-10-06
2008-01-2488
This paper discusses the poisoning of a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst by trace levels of platinum originating from an upstream diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC). A diesel aftertreatment system consisting of a DOC, urea based SCR Catalyst and a DPF was aged and evaluated on a 6.4 liter diesel engine dynamometer. The SCR catalyst system consisted of an Fe-zeolite catalyst followed by a Cu-zeolite catalyst. After approximately 400 hours of engine operation at varied exhaust flow rates and temperatures, deactivation of the SCR catalyst was observed. A subsequent detailed investigation revealed that the Cu catalyst was not deactivated and the front half of the Fe-based catalyst showed severe deactivation. The deactivated portion of the catalyst showed high activity of NH3 conversion to NOx and N2O formation. The cause of the deactivation was identified to be the presence of trace Pt contamination.
Technical Paper

Influence of Hydrocarbon Storage on the Durability of SCR Catalysts

2008-04-14
2008-01-0767
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a technology capable of meeting Tier 2 Bin 5 emissions levels of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) for diesel engines. Base metal zeolite catalysts show the best combination of thermal durability and NOX conversion activity. It is shown in this work that some base metal zeolite catalysts can store high levels of hydrocarbons (HCs). Also, base metal zeolite catalysts can catalyze oxidation of HCs under certain conditions. Oxidation of stored hydrocarbons can lead to permanent catalyst deactivation due to the exotherm generated in the SCR catalyst (over-temperature condition leading to SCR catalyst damage). This paper discusses a laboratory bench test to characterize hydrocarbon storage and burn-off characteristics of several SCR catalyst formulations, as well as engine dynamometer tests showing hydrocarbon storage and exotherm generation.
Journal Article

Technical Advantages of Vanadium SCR Systems for Diesel NOx Control in Emerging Markets

2008-04-14
2008-01-1029
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a promising technology for diesel aftertreatment to meet NOx emissions targets in several countries. In established markets such as the US and Europe, zeolite SCR systems are expected to be used due to their ability to survive the exhaust gas temperatures seen in an active diesel particulate filter regeneration. In emerging markets where the fuel sulfur level may be as high as 2000 parts per million, zeolite SCR catalysts may have durability issues. In these markets, low sulfur fuel is needed overall to meet emissions standards and to avoid high sulfate emissions, but the aftertreatment system must be durable to high sulfur levels because there is a risk of exposure to high sulfur fuel. Also, emissions standards may be met without a DPF in some applications, so that the exhaust system would not see temperatures of 600°C or higher.
Journal Article

Enhanced Durability of a Cu/Zeolite Based SCR Catalyst

2008-04-14
2008-01-1025
Passenger and light duty diesel vehicles will require up to 90% NOx conversion over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) to meet future Tier 2 Bin 5 standards. This accomplishment is especially challenging for low exhaust temperature applications that mostly operate in the 200 - 350°C temperature regime. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts formulated with Cu/zeolites have shown the potential to deliver this level of performance fresh, but their performance can easily deteriorate over time as a result of high temperature thermal deactivation. These high temperature SCR deactivation modes are unavoidable due to the requirements necessary to actively regenerate diesel particulate filters and purge SCRs from sulfur and hydrocarbon contamination. Careful vehicle temperature control of these events is necessary to prevent unintentional thermal damage but not always possible. As a result, there is a need to develop thermally robust SCR catalysts.
Journal Article

Combined Fe-Cu SCR Systems with Optimized Ammonia to NOx Ratio for Diesel NOx Control

2008-04-14
2008-01-1185
Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a viable option for control of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from diesel engines. Currently, copper zeolite (Cu-zeolite) SCR catalysts are favored for configurations where the exhaust gas temperature is below 450°C for the majority of operating conditions, while iron zeolite (Fe-zeolite) SCR catalysts are preferred where NOx conversion is needed at temperatures above 450°C. The selection of Cu-zeolite or Fe-zeolite SCR catalysts is based on the different performance characteristics of these two catalyst types. Cu-zeolite catalysts are generally known for having efficient NOx reduction at low temperatures with little or no NO2, and they tend to selectively oxidize ammonia (NH3) to N2 at temperatures above 400°C, leading to poor NOx conversion at elevated temperatures.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Ammonia to NOX Ratio on SCR Performance

2007-04-16
2007-01-1581
It is likely that use of urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) will be needed to meet U.S. Tier 2 diesel emission standards for oxides of nitrogen (NOx). The ideal ratio of ammonia (NH3) molecules to NOx molecules (known as alpha) is 1:1 based on urea consumption and having NH3 available for reaction of all of the exhaust NOx. However, SCR efficiency can be less than 100% at low temperatures in general, and at higher temperatures with high exhaust SCR catalyst space velocities. At the low temperatures where NOx conversion efficiency is low, it may be advantageous to reduce the alpha ratio to values less than one (less NH3 than is needed to convert 100% of the NOx emissions) to avoid NH3 slip. At higher space velocities and high temperatures, the NOx conversion efficiency may be higher with alpha ratios greater than 1. There is however concern that the additional NH3 will be slipped under these conditions.
Technical Paper

Laboratory Studies and Mathematical Modeling of Urea SCR Catalyst Performance

2007-04-16
2007-01-1573
This paper presents the development of an analytical model that complements laboratory based experiments to provide a tool for Selective Catalyst Reduction (SCR) applications. The model calibration is based on measured data from NOx reduction performance tests as well as ammonia (NH3) adsorption/desorption tests over select SCR catalyst formulations in a laboratory flow reactor. Only base metal/zeolite SCR samples were evaluated. Limited validations are presented that show the model agrees well with vehicle data from Environmental Protection Agency Federal Test Procedure (EPA FTP) emission assessments. The model includes energy and mass balances, several different NH3 reactions with NOx, NH3 adsorption and desorption algorithms, and NH3 oxidation.
Technical Paper

The Influence of Ammonia Slip Catalysts on Ammonia, N2O and NOX Emissions for Diesel Engines

2007-04-16
2007-01-1572
The use of urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a promising method for achieving U.S. Tier 2 diesel emission standards for NOx. To meet the Tier 2 standards for Particulate Matter (PM), a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) will likely be present and any ammonia (NH3) that is not consumed over an SCR catalyst would pass over the CDPF to make nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions and/or oxides of nitrogen (NOx), or exit the exhaust system as NH3. N2O is undesirable due to its high greenhouse gas potential, while NOx production from the slipped NH3 would reduce overall system NOx conversion efficiency. This paper reviews certain conditions where NH3 slip past an SCR system may be a concern, looks at what would happen to this slipped NH3 over a CDPF, and evaluates the performance of various supplier NH3 slip catalysts under varied space velocities, temperatures and concentrations of NH3 and NOx.
X