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Technical Paper

Experimental Study of Acoustic and Thermal Performance of Sound Absorbers with Microperforated Aluminum Foil

2019-06-05
2019-01-1580
Aluminum foil applied to the surface of sound absorbing materials has broad application in the automotive industry. A foil layer offers thermal insulation for components close to exhaust pipes, turbo chargers, and other heat sources in the engine compartment and underbody. It can also add physical protection for acoustic parts in water-splash or stone-impingement areas of the vehicle exterior. It is known that adding impermeable plain foil will impact the sound absorption negatively, so Microperforated Aluminum Foil (MPAF) is widely used to counteract this effect. Acoustic characteristics of MPAF can be modeled analytically, but deviation of perforation size and shape, variation of hole density, material compression, and adhesive applied to the back of the foil for the molding process can impact the acoustic and thermal insulation performance.
Technical Paper

Sound Analysis Method for Warble Noise in Electric Actuators

2019-06-05
2019-01-1521
Multiple automotive applications exist for small electric motors that are activated by vehicle occupants for various functions such as window lifts and seat adjusters. For such a motor to be described as high quality, not only should the sound it produces be low in amplitude, but it also needs to be free from pulsations and variations that might occur during its (otherwise) steady-state operation. If a motor’s sound contains pulsations or variations between 2 and 8 cycles per second, the variation is described as warble. To establish performance targets for warble noise at both the vehicle and component level a way to measure and quantify the warble noise must be established. Building on existing sound quality metrics such as loudness and pitch variation, a method is established by which processed sound data is put through a secondary operation of Fourier analysis.
Technical Paper

Vibro-Acoustic Analysis for Modeling Propeller Shaft Liner Material

2019-06-05
2019-01-1560
In recent truck applications, single-piece large-diameter propshafts, in lieu of two-piece propshafts, have become more prevalent to reduce cost and mass. These large-diameter props, however, amplify driveline radiated noise. The challenge presented is to optimize prop shaft modal tuning to achieve acceptable radiated noise levels. Historically, CAE methods and capabilities have not been able to accurately predict propshaft airborne noise making it impossible to cascade subsystem noise requirements needed to achieve desired vehicle level performance. As a result, late and costly changes can be needed to make a given vehicle commercially acceptable for N&V performance prior to launch. This paper will cover the development of a two-step CAE method to predict modal characteristics and airborne noise sensitivities of large-diameter single piece aluminum propshafts fitted with different liner treatments.
Technical Paper

Tonal Annoyance Metric Development for Automotive Electric Vehicles

2019-06-05
2019-01-1467
Historical metrics intended to drive the development of vehicle powertrains have focused on sounds that are characteristic of IC engines. The interior noise contribution of the propulsion system in electric vehicles has significantly more tonal noise (and much less impulsive and broadband noise) than their IC engine counterparts. This tonal noise is not adequately represented by current propulsion systems metrics. While metrics exist today that were developed to represent the presence of tones in sounds most have focused on the level aspect of the tones relative to the surrounding noise or masking level, some examples include tonality, tone-to-noise ratio, and prominence ratio. A secondary, but also important aspect of tones is the annoyance as a function of frequency. This paper will highlight the development of a tonal annoyance weighting curve that can be used to account for the frequency aspect of tonal annoyance relative to electric vehicles.
Technical Paper

Effectiveness of Power-Law Profile Indentations on Structure-Borne Noise

2019-06-05
2019-01-1496
A study on the effect of indenting power-law shaped profiles on the flexible structures for investigating the vibration damping characteristics using computational simulation method is discussed. The simulation results are checked to see the impact of such features on the damping behavior of flexible structures responsible for radiating noise when excited with fluctuating loads. Though the conventional remedies for solving Noise and vibration issues generally involves tuning of structure stiffness or damping treatment this paper gives an insight on the idea of manipulation of elastic waves within the flexible structure itself to minimize the cross-reflections of the mechanical waves. The simulation studies mentioned in this paper not only hovers over the effectiveness of such features but also will be helpful for the engineers to look through a different perspective while solving N&V issues using simulation tools.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Development of the 2019 Chevrolet Corvette C7 ZR1

2019-04-02
2019-01-0665
This paper presents an overview of the aerodynamic development of the 2019 Chevrolet Corvette C7 ZR1. Extensive wind tunnel testing and computational fluid dynamics simulations were completed to engineer the ZR1’s aerodynamics to improve lift-to-drag efficiency and track capability over previous Corvette offerings. The ZR1 architecture changes posed many aerodynamic challenges including increased vehicle cooling, strict packaging demands, wider front track width, and aggressive exterior styling. Through motorsports-inspired aerodynamic development, the ZR1 was engineered to overcome these challenges through the creation of new devices such as a raised rear wing and front underwing. The resulting Standard ZR1 achieved a top speed of 212 mph making it the fastest Corvette ever [1]. Optionally, the ZR1 with the ZTK Performance Package provides the highest downforce of any Corvette, generating approximately 950 pounds at the ZTK’s top speed [1].
Technical Paper

Parametric Optimization of Planetary Carrier for Durability

2019-01-09
2019-26-0049
Planetary gear set is one of the most commonly used gear systems in automotive industry as they cater to high power density requirements. A simple planetary gear set consists of a sun gear, ring gear, planets and carrier which houses planet gears. Efficiency of a transmission is dependent upon performance of gear sets involved in power transfer to a great extent. Structural rigidity of a planetary carrier is critical in a planetary gear set as its deflection may alter the load distribution of gears in mesh causing durability and noise issues. Limited studies exist based on geometrical parameters of a carrier which would help a designer in selecting the dimensions at an early stage. In this study, an end to end automated FEA process based on DOE and optimization in Isight is developed. The method incorporates a workflow allowing for an update of carrier geometry, FE model setup, analysis job submission and post-processing of results.
Technical Paper

Mechanism Analysis and Simulation Study of Automobile Millimeter Wave Radar Noise

2018-08-07
2018-01-1641
The paper analyzes the mechanism of automobile millimeter wave radar noise, this paper does not study radar noise from the angle of signal processing, but from the level of false detection and missed detection, at the same time, the noise mechanism is modeled and verified. Firstly, the purpose and significance of the research of radar vehicle noise are described, and then, we summarize and outline the macro phenomenon and the specific characteristics of the automobile millimeter wave radar noise.
Technical Paper

Powertrain Mounting Robust Evaluation Methodology Utilizing Minimal Hardware Resources

2017-06-05
2017-01-1823
Powertrain mounting systems design and development involves creating and optimizing a solution using specific mount rates and evaluation over multiple operating conditions. These mount rates become the recommended “nominal” rates in the specifications. The powertrain mounts typically contain natural materials. These properties have variation, resulting in a tolerance around the nominal specification and lead to differences in noise and vibration performance. A powertrain mounting system that is robust to this variation is desired. The design and development process requires evaluation of these mounts, within tolerance, to ensure that the noise and vibration performance is consistently met. During the hardware development of the powertrain mounting system, a library of mounts that include the range of production variation is studied. However, this is time consuming.
Journal Article

FWD Halfshaft Angle Optimization Using 12 Degree of Freedom Analytical Model

2017-06-05
2017-01-1770
This paper describes the development of an analytical method to assess and optimize halfshaft joint angles to avoid excessive 3rd halfshaft order vibrations during wide-open-throttle (WOT) and light drive-away events. The objective was to develop a test-correlated analytical model to assess and optimize driveline working angles during the virtual design phase of a vehicle program when packaging tradeoffs are decided. A twelve degree-of-freedom (12DOF) system model was constructed that comprehends halfshaft dynamic angle change, axle torque, powertrain (P/T) mount rate progression and axial forces generated by tripot type constant velocity (CV) joints. Note: “tripot” and “tripod” are alternate nomenclatures for the same type of joint. Simple lumped parameter models have historically been used for P/T mount optimization; however, this paper describes a method for using a lumped parameter model to also optimize driveline working angles.
Technical Paper

Development of ECE R51.03 Noise Emission Regulation

2017-06-05
2017-01-1893
This paper will examine the regulatory development process, discuss the technical principles of the Economic Commission for Europe (ECE), R51.03 test, and discuss the overall objectives of the ECE R51.03 noise emission regulation. The development of this global noise emission regulation was a multi-stakeholder process which has resulted in new test procedures and new noise emission regulation principles. New test procedures based on ISO 362-1:2015 move the test basis to representative in-use noise emission, independent of vehicle propulsion technology. As part of the regulatory development, a monitoring program was conducted by the European Union to assess the applicability of the proposed test to provide representative vehicle noise emission results. The monitoring results also provided the basis to determine equivalent stringency between the test procedures of ECE R51.02 and R51.03.
Technical Paper

Application of Micro-Perforated Composite Acoustic Material to a Vehicle Dash Mat

2011-05-17
2011-01-1623
In recent years several variants of lightweight multi-layered acoustic treatments have been used successfully in vehicles to replace conventional barrier-decoupler interior dash mats. The principle involved is to utilize increased acoustic absorption to offset the decrease in insertion loss from the reduced mass such that equivalent vehicle level performance can be achieved. Typical dual density fibrous constructions consist of a relatively dense cap layer on top of a lofted layer. The density and flow resistivity of these layers are tuned to optimize a balance of insertion loss and absorption performance. Generally these have been found to be very effective with the exception of dash mats with very high insertion loss requirements. This paper describes an alternative treatment which consists of a micro-perforated film top layer and fibrous decoupler layer.
Technical Paper

Calculations of Wind Tunnel Circuit Losses and Speed with Acoustic Foams

2008-04-14
2008-01-1203
The GM Aerodynamics Laboratory (GMAL) was modified in 2001 to reduce the background noise level and provide a semi-anechoic test section for wind noise testing. The walls and ceiling of the test section were lined with acoustic foam and foam-filled turning vanes were installed in the corners. Portions of the wind tunnel circuit were also treated with fiberglass material covered by perforated sheet metal panels. High skin drag due to roughness of the foam surfaces, along with high blockage due to the large turning vanes, increased the wind tunnel circuit losses so that the maximum wind speed in the test section was reduced. The present study calculates the averaged total pressure losses at three locations to evaluate the reductions in skin drag and blockage from proposed modifications to the circuit, which were intended to increase the test section wind speed without compromising noise levels.
Technical Paper

Experimental Characterization of the Unsteady Flow Field behind Two outside Rear View Mirrors

2008-04-14
2008-01-0476
The unsteady flow fields behind two different automobile outside side rear view mirrors were examined experimentally in order to obtain a comprehensive data base for the validation of the ongoing computational investigation effort to predict the aero-acoustic noise due to the outside rear view mirrors. This study is part of a larger scheme to predict the aero-acoustic noise due to various external components in vehicles. To aid with the characterization of this complex flow field, mean and unsteady surface pressure measurements were undertaken in the wake of two mirror models. Velocity measurements with particle image velocimetry were also conducted to develop the mean velocity field of the wake. Two full-scale mirror models with distinctive geometrical features were investigated.
Technical Paper

HELS Based Acoustic Holographic Measurements to Evaluate Structure-Borne Noise

2007-05-15
2007-01-2281
General Motors (GM) recently purchased an acoustic holography system based on the Helmholtz Equation Least Squares (HELS) methodology. Typically acoustic holography has utilized planar transformation of the Fourier acoustic equations. General Motors conducted a variety of experiments on a simple well understood structure. This enabled us to understand the setup parameters and confirm the manufacturer's claims for accuracy. Measurements on the structure were taken using the HELS based equipment and a laser vibrometer. Conclusions are drawn on how to set up the equipment for future testing on vehicles.
Technical Paper

Integration of Independent Front Axles for Gear Mesh Energy

2007-05-15
2007-01-2240
The need for improved axle NVH integration has increased significantly in recent years with industry trends toward full-time and automatic four wheel drive (4wd) systems. Along with seamless 4wd operation, quiet performance has become a universal expectation. Axle gear-mesh noise can be transmitted to the vehicle passenger compartment through airborne paths (not discussed in this paper) and structure-borne paths (the focus of this paper.) A variety of mounting configurations are used in an attempt to provide improved axle isolation and reduce structure-borne transmission of gear-mesh noise. The configuration discussed in this paper is a 4-point vertical mount design for an Independent Front Drive Axle (IFDA). A significant benefit of this configuration is improved isolation in the range of drive torques where axle-related NVH issues typically exist.
Technical Paper

Design Enhancement of the Rear Composite Structure for the 2005 Chevrolet Corvette Coupe and Z06

2005-04-11
2005-01-0467
This paper describes the design and development of the rear compartment structure of the sixth generation Corvette, C6, which starts in the 2005 model year. The improved design integrates the rear compartment packaging to address issues seen on fifth generation Corvette, C5. The molded composite fiberglass reinforced, tub and surround panels are similar to the C5. These large panels are modified to fit the new styling theme of the C6, while also addressing the packaging requirements of the updated underbody structure and exhaust system. New composite side support brackets and cross car reinforcement combine to address several desired improvements. These side support brackets are designed to package the rear audio speakers, electrical modules, wiring and cable routing while also addressing build variation and localized stiffness improvement. The side brackets support the surround panel increasing the manufacturing control of the surround panel.
Technical Paper

GM's Evolving Epsilon Midsize Car Platform

2005-04-11
2005-01-1028
This paper reviews the history of the General Motor's Epsilon Platform from a Body Structure perspective. From the time that it was conceived in 1996 to the present, the platform has evolved to meet many changing requirements. The focus of this paper will cover basic body requirements such as crash performance, modal requirements, packaging issues, changes for wheelbase and powertrains, mass, different body styles, etc, including the differences between European and US requirements. It will demonstrate that this globally developed platform met all its initial requirements and continued to evolve over time to meet additional changing requirements.
Technical Paper

Development of a Luxury Vehicle Acoustic Package using SEA Full Vehicle Model

2003-05-05
2003-01-1554
Interior noise has become a significant performance attribute in modern passenger vehicles and this is extremely important in the luxury market segment where a quiet interior is the price of entry. With the elimination of early prototype vehicles to reduce development costs, high frequency analytical SEA models are used to design the vehicle sound package to meet targets for interior noise quality. This function is important before representative NVH prototypes are available, and later to support parameter variation investigations that would be cost prohibitive in a hardware test. This paper presents the application of an analytical full vehicle SEA model for the development of the acoustic package of a cross over luxury utility vehicle. The development concerns addressed were airborne powertrain noise and road noise. Power flow analysis was used to identify the major noise paths to the interior of the vehicle.
Technical Paper

The Use of in Vehicle STL Testing to Correlate Subsystem Level SEA Models

2003-05-05
2003-01-1564
For the assessment of vehicle acoustics in the early design stages of a vehicle program, the use of full vehicle SEA models is becoming the standard analysis method in the US automotive industry. One benefit is that OEM's and Tier 1 suppliers are able to cascade lower level acoustic performance targets for NVH systems and components. Detailed SEA system level models can be used to assess the performance of systems such as dash panels, floors and doors, however, the results will be questionable until test data Is available. Correlation can be accomplished with buck testing, which is a common practice in the automotive industry for assessing the STL (sound transmission loss) of vehicle level components. The opportunity to conduct buck testing can be limited by the availability of representative bodies to be cut into bucks and the availability of a transmission loss suite with a suitably large opening.
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