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Technical Paper

Experimental and Computational Study of DOC on CSF for Heavy Duty Diesel Applications

2019-04-02
2019-01-0586
For diesel exhaust aftertreatment applications with space limitations, as well as to move the selective catalytic reduction system (SCR) to a warmer location closer to the engine, DOC on CSF technology can be used. This technology combines the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and catalyzed soot filter (CSF) functionalities in one component, thereby enabling volume reduction. DOC on CSF maintains the abatement of hydrocarbon (HC), carbon monoxide (CO), and particulate matter (PM), and the oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) for passive soot oxidation and fast SCR reaction of NOx on a downstream SCR catalyst. In this study, the performance of DOC on CSF was compared to a DOC + bare diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a DOC + CSF system, to understand the performance benefits and challenges. All the components were optimized individually for their respective functions. The DOC on CSF was optimized for NO oxidation and passive soot oxidation performance.
Technical Paper

Sustained Low Temperature NOx Reduction

2018-04-03
2018-01-0341
Sustained NOx reduction at low temperatures, especially in the 150-200 °C range, shares some similarities with the more commonly discussed cold-start challenge, however, poses a number of additional and distinct technical problems. In this project, we set a bold target of achieving and maintaining 90% NOx conversion at the SCR catalyst inlet temperature of 150 °C. This project is intended to push the boundaries of the existing technologies, while staying within the realm of realistic future practical implementation. In order to meet the resulting challenges at the levels of catalyst fundamentals, system components, and system integration, Cummins has partnered with the DOE, Johnson Matthey, and Pacific Northwest National Lab and initiated the Sustained Low-Temperature NOx Reduction program at the beginning of 2015 and completed in 2017.
Journal Article

Aftertreatment Architecture and Control Methodologies for Future Light Duty Diesel Emission Regulations

2017-03-28
2017-01-0911
Future light duty vehicles in the United States are required to be certified on the FTP-75 cycle to meet Tier 3 or LEV III emission standards [1, 2]. The cold phase of this cycle is heavily weighted and mitigation of emissions during this phase is crucial to meet the low tail pipe emission targets [3, 4]. In this work, a novel aftertreatment architecture and controls to improve Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) and Hydrocarbon (HC) or Non Methane Organic gases (NMOG) conversion efficiencies at low temperatures is proposed. This includes a passive NOx & HC adsorber, termed the diesel Cold Start Concept (dCSC™) catalyst, followed by a Selective Catalytic Reduction catalyst on Filter (SCRF®) and an under-floor Selective Catalytic Reduction catalyst (SCR). The system utilizes a gaseous ammonia delivery system capable of dosing at two locations to maximize NOx conversion and minimize parasitic ammonia oxidation and ammonia slip.
Journal Article

Durability Assessment of Diesel Cold Start Concept (dCSC™) Technologies

2017-03-28
2017-01-0955
The phase-in of US EPA Tier 3 and California LEV III emission standards require further reduction of tailpipe criteria pollutants from automobiles. At the same time, the mandate for reducing Green House Gas (GHG) emissions continuously lowers the exhaust temperature. Both regulations pose significant challenges to emission control catalyst technologies, especially for cold start emissions. The recently developed diesel cold start concept technology (dCSC™) shows promising results. It stores NOx and HC during the cold start period until the downstream catalytic components reach their operating temperatures, when the stored NOx/HC are subsequently released and converted. The technology also has oxidation functions built in and acts as a diesel oxidation catalyst under normal operating conditions. In a US DOE funded project, the diesel cold start concept technology enabled a high fuel efficiency vehicle to achieve emissions targets well below the SULEV30 emission standards.
Technical Paper

After-Treatment Systems to Meet China NS VI, India BS VI Regulation Limits

2017-03-28
2017-01-0941
Future emissions regulations proposed for the Asian automotive industry (BS VI regulations for India and NS VI regulations for China) are strict and similar to EU VI regulations. As a result, they will require both advanced NOx control as well as advanced Particulate Matter (PM) control. This will drive implementation of full Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (cDPF) and simultaneous NOx control using Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technologies. In this work, we present the performance of various Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC), cDPF, SCR and Ammonia slip catalyst (ASC) systems utilizing the World Harmonized Transient Cycle (WHTC). Aftertreatment Systems (ATS) required for both active and passive filter regeneration applications will be discussed. The sensitivity of key design parameters like catalyst technology, PGM loading, catalyst sizing to meet the regulation limits has been investigated.
Journal Article

Impact of Rh Oxidation State on NOx Reduction Performance of Multi-Component Lean NOx Trap (LNT) Catalyst

2016-04-05
2016-01-0947
Typical Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalyst composition includes precious metal components (Pt, Pd, and/or Rh), responsible for NO oxidation during lean operation and NOx reduction during rich operation. It was found that redox history of commercial LNT catalyst plays a significant role on deciding its NOx conversion under Lean/Rich cyclic condition. Further test had shown that fully formulated LNT catalyst being pre-reduced had shown much better NO reduction activity during the temperature-programmed reduction (TPRx) of NO than the same LNT catalyst being oxidized. The following study with Rh-only and Pt-only catalyst had demonstrated that Rh plays a key role on the large variation of the NO reduction function due to oxidation state change over LNT catalyst.
Journal Article

Development of Emission Control Systems to Enable High NOx Conversion on Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

2015-04-14
2015-01-0992
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems have been demonstrated as effective solutions for controlling NOx emissions from Heavy Duty diesel engines. Future HD diesel engines are being designed for higher engine out NOx to improve fuel economy, while discussions are in progress for tightening NOx emissions from HD engines post 2020. This will require increasingly higher NOx conversions across the emission control system and will challenge the current aftertreatment designs. Typical 2010/2013 Heavy Duty systems include a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) along with a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF) in addition to the SCR sub-assembly. For future aftertreatment designs, advanced technologies such as cold start concept (dCSC™) catalyst, SCR coated on filter (SCRF® hereafter referred to as SCR-DPF) and SCR coated on high porous flow through substrates can be utilized to achieve high NOx conversions, in combination with improved control strategies.
Technical Paper

Demonstration of SCR on a Diesel Particulate Filter System on a Heavy Duty Application

2015-04-14
2015-01-1033
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. Typical 2013 Heavy Duty Diesel emission control systems include a DOC upstream of a catalyzed soot filter (CSF) which is followed by urea injection and the SCR sub-assembly. There is a strong desire to further increase the NOx conversion capability of such systems, which would enable additional fuel economy savings by allowing engines to be calibrated to higher engine-out NOx levels. One potential approach is to replace the CSF with a diesel particulate filter coated with SCR catalysts (SCRF® technology, hereafter referred to as SCR-DPF) while keeping the flow-through SCR elements downstream, which essentially increases the SCR volume in the after-treatment assembly without affecting the overall packaging.
Technical Paper

Development of Emission Control Systems to Enable High NOx Conversion on Heavy Duty Diesel Engines

2014-04-01
2014-01-1525
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems have been demonstrated as effective solutions for controlling NOx emissions from Heavy Duty diesel engines. Future HD diesel engines are being designed for higher engine out NOx to improve fuel economy, which will require increasingly higher NOx conversion to meet emission regulations. For future aftertreatment designs, advanced technologies such as SCR coated on filter (SCRF®) and SCR coated on high porous flow through substrates can be utilized to achieve high NOx conversion. In this work, different options were evaluated for achieving high NOx conversion. First, high performance NOx control catalysts were designed by using SCRF unit followed by additional SCR on high porosity substrates. Second, different control strategies were evaluated to understand the effect of reductant dosing strategy and thermal management on NOx conversion. Tests were carried out on a HD engine under transient test cycles.
Journal Article

Factors Affecting Three-Way Catalyst Light-Off: A Simulation Study

2014-04-01
2014-01-1564
Achieving early catalyst light-off is crucial if stringent emissions standards are to be met; if light-off is late, the emissions limit could be exceeded even before the catalyst starts to work. This paper presents a detailed simulation study of the factors affecting the light-off of a TWC. Simulation is not just faster and cheaper than vehicle testing, it also enables more insight into the factors affecting catalyst performance to be obtained. For example, changing the substrate (cell density and wall thickness) affects the rates of heat and mass transport, as well as the thermal mass of the catalyst. In a vehicle test, all three factors are changed at once, but with a simulation each of these factors can implemented one at time to enable the relative importance of these factors to be determined.
Journal Article

Development of SCR on High Porosity Substrates for Heavy Duty and Off-Road Applications

2014-04-01
2014-01-1521
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. There is a drive to reduce the overall packaging volume of the aftertreatment system for these applications. In addition, more active SCR catalysts will be needed as the applications become more challenging: e.g. lower temperatures and higher engine out NOx, for fuel consumption improvements. One approach to meet the challenges of reduced volume and/or higher NOx reduction is to increase the active site density of the SCR catalyst by coating higher amount of SCR catalyst on high porosity substrates (HPS). This approach could enable the reduction of the overall packaging volume while maintaining similar NOx conversion as compared to 2010/2013 systems, or improve the NOx reduction performance for equivalent volume and NH3 slip.
Journal Article

Gasoline Cold Start Concept (gCSC™) Technology for Low Temperature Emission Control

2014-04-01
2014-01-1509
Stricter emission standards in the near future require not only a high conversion efficiency of the toxic air pollutants but also a substantial reduction of the greenhouse gases from automotive exhaust. Advanced engines with improved fuel efficiency can reduce the greenhouse gas emissions; their exhaust temperature is, however, also low. This consequently poses significant challenges to the emission control system demanding the catalysts to function at low temperatures both during the cold start period and under the normal engine operation conditions. In this paper, we will introduce a gasoline Cold Start Concept (gCSC™) technology developed for advanced stoichiometric-burn gasoline engines to meet future stringent emission regulations. To improve the low temperature performance of three-way catalysts, a novel Al2O3/CeO2/ZrO2 mixed oxide was developed.
Journal Article

Cold Start Concept (CSC™): A Novel Catalyst for Cold Start Emission Control

2013-04-08
2013-01-0535
Catalytic emission control systems are installed on nearly all automobiles and heavy-duty trucks produced today to reduce exhaust emissions for the vehicles to meet government regulations. Current systems can achieve very high efficiencies in reducing tailpipe emissions once the catalytic components reach their operating temperatures. They are, however, relatively ineffective at temperatures below their operating temperature windows, especially during the cold start period of the vehicles. With the increasingly stringent government regulations, reducing the emissions during the cold start period before the catalytic components reach their operating temperatures is becoming a major challenge. For cold start HC control, HC traps based on zeolites have been investigated and commercialized for certain applications. For cold start NOx control, especially in lean burn engine exhaust, NOx storage and release catalysts have been evaluated.
Technical Paper

Decoupling the Interactions of Hydrocarbons and Oxides of Nitrogen Over Diesel Oxidation Catalysts

2011-04-12
2011-01-1137
Oxidation of NO to NO₂ over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) plays an important role in different types of aftertreatment systems, by enhancing NOx storage on adsorber catalysts, improving the NOx reduction efficiency of SCR catalysts, and enabling the passive regeneration of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF). The presence of hydrocarbon (HC) species in the exhaust is known to affect the NO oxidation performance over a DOC; however, specific details of this effect, including its underlying mechanism, remain poorly understood. Two major pathways are commonly considered to be responsible for the overall effect: NO oxidation inhibition, due to the presence of HC, and the consumption of the NO₂ produced by reaction with hydrocarbons. In this work we have attempted to decouple these two pathways, by adjusting the catalyst inlet concentrations of NO and NO₂ to the thermodynamic equilibrium levels and measuring the composition changes over the catalyst in the presence of HC species.
Journal Article

Development of SCR on Diesel Particulate Filter System for Heavy Duty Applications

2011-04-12
2011-01-1312
Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts have been demonstrated as an effective solution for controlling NOx emissions from diesel engines. Typical 2010 Heavy-Duty systems include a DOC along with a catalyzed soot filter (CSF) in addition to the SCR sub-assembly. There is a strong desire to further increase the NOx conversion capability of such systems, to enable additional fuel economy savings by allowing engines to be calibrated to higher engine-out NOx levels. One potential approach is to replace the CSF with a diesel particulate filter coated with SCR catalysts (SCR-DPF) while keeping the flow-through SCR elements downstream, which essentially increases the SCR volume in the after-treatment assembly without affecting the overall packaging. In this work, a system consisting of SCR-DPF was evaluated in comparison to the DOC + CSF components from a commercial 2010 DOC + CSF + SCR system on an engine with the engine EGR on (standard engine-out NOx) and off (high engine-out NOx).
Technical Paper

Engine Performance of Cu- and Fe-Based SCR Emission Control Systems for Heavy Duty Diesel Applications

2011-04-12
2011-01-1329
Since early 2010, most new medium- and heavy-duty diesel vehicles in the US rely on urea-based Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for meeting the most stringent regulations on nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in the world today. Catalyst technologies of choice include Copper (Cu)- and Iron (Fe)-based SCR. In this work, the performances of Fe-SCR and Cu-SCR were investigated in the most commonly used DOC + CSF + SCR system configuration. Cu-SCR offered advantages over Fe-SCR in terms of low temperature conversion, NO₂:NOx ratio tolerance and NH₃ slip, while Fe-SCR demonstrated superior performance under optimized NO₂:NOx ratio and at higher temperatures. The Cu-SCR catalyst displayed less tolerance to sulfur (S) exposure. Reactor testing has shown that Cu-SCR catalysts deactivate at low temperature when poisoned by sulfur.
Journal Article

Spatially-Resolved Thermal Degradation Induced Temperature Pattern Changes along a Commercial Lean NOX Trap Catalyst

2010-04-12
2010-01-1214
The low-temperature performance characteristics of a commercial lean NOX trap catalyst were evaluated using infra-red thermography (IRT) before and after a high-temperature aging step. Reaction tests included propylene oxidation, oxygen storage capacity measurements, and simulated cycling conditions for NOX reduction, using H₂ as the reductant during the regeneration step of the cycle. Testing with and without NO in the lean phase showed thermal differences between the reductant used in reducing the stored oxygen and that for nitrate decomposition and reduction. IRT clearly demonstrated where NOX trapping and regeneration were occurring spatially as a function of regeneration conditions, with variables including hydrogen content of the regeneration phase and lean- and rich-phase cycle times.
Technical Paper

Advanced Catalysts for Combined (NAC + SCR) Emission Control Systems

2010-04-12
2010-01-0302
Emission control systems combining NOx Adsorber catalysts with Selective Catalytic Reduction catalysts (NAC + SCR) offer potential performance advantages for NOx control under lean conditions compared to systems consisting of only one of these technologies. The combined systems, however, also present new catalyst design challenges. In contrast to NAC-only systems, formation of NH₃ over the NAC component under NOx regeneration conditions is a desirable feature in the combined (NAC + SCR) system. The SCR component in the combined system needs to be as thermally durable as the stand-alone SCR technology and also has to withstand repeated high-temperature lean/rich transients encountered during periodic desulfation of the upstream NAC component. In this study, advanced NAC and SCR components were developed specifically for the combination system. The advanced NAC component exhibited a wider operating temperature window and higher NH₃ generation activity at reduced PGM loading.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Oil-Derived Poisons on Three-Way Catalyst Performance

2002-03-04
2002-01-1093
Two major deactivation mechanisms of automotive catalysts during road usage are: 1. thermal aging 2. poison accumulation of oil-derived poisons such as zinc and phosphorus. A dynamometer-based aging cycle, incorporating a high-temperature low-poison mode to account for thermal aging followed by a low-temperature high-poison mode to account for poison accumulation, has been developed to allow the examination of catalyst formulations after exposure to both a harsh thermal and chemical aging environment. This type of aging cycle results in dynamometer-aged catalysts that are physically much more similar to road-aged catalysts than thermally-based dynamometer cycles. Using this aging-cycle, Pd-only, Pd-Rh and Pt-Rh light-off catalysts were examined. The Pd-Rh catalyst gave the best overall performance, with equivalent HC light-off performance to the Pd-only catalyst and equivalent NOx performance to the Pt-Rh catalyst.
Technical Paper

Development of Emission Control Technology for Urban Bus Retrofit

2000-03-06
2000-01-0479
The EPA implemented the Urban Bus Retrofit/Rebuild (UBRR) Program for transit buses built before 1994 in an effort to lower the amount of PM emissions in densely populated urban areas. The objective of the program is to provide certified emission control technologies that reduce PM emissions from older buses by 25% or to below 0.1 g/bhp-hr. This paper reviews the development of a retrofit kit that has been certified under the UBRR program to meet the 0.1 g/bhp-hr PM emission requirements on DDC 6V92TA engines with both mechanical (MUI) and electronic (DDEC) fuel injection controls. The kit is a combination of specific and modified engine parts and a catalytic exhaust after-treatment device. The kit replaces existing parts with a new camshaft, a uniquely configured cylinder kit and specified turbocharger, blower and injector. For the MUI engines the cam timing, injector height and fuel modulator are set at specific values to achieve the lowest possible PM level.
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