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Technical Paper

Psychoacoustic Analysis of High Frequency Elasto-Acoustic Emissions from Hollow Driveshaft Tubes

2018-06-13
2018-01-1475
Lightly damped non-linear systems such as vehicular drivelines undergo a plethora of Noise, Vibration and Harshness (NVH) problems. The clonk phenomenon is one concern which occurs as the result of impulsive torque input in the form of sudden clutch actuation or throttle tip-in and back-out. The resulting impact of meshing gear pairs propagate structural waves down the driveline. With lightly damped thin-walled tubes having high modal density, elasto-acoustic coupling occurs. High frequency noise emission is of metallic nature and quite disconcerting to vehicle occupants as well as passers-by. It is perceived as structural failure and/or poor-quality build. Therefore, the occurrence of the phenomenon is a concern to vehicle manufacturers and progressively constitutes a warranty concern. This paper investigates the clonk phenomenon through use of a long-wheel base rear drive light truck test rig.
Technical Paper

A Computational and Experimental Investigation into the Effects of Debris on an Inverted Double Wing in Ground Effect

2018-04-03
2018-01-0726
Cars in several motor sports series, such as Formula 1, make use of multi-element front wings to provide downforce. These wings also provide onset flows to other surfaces that generate downforce. These elements are highly loaded to maximise their performance and are generally operating close to stall. Rubber debris, often known as marbles, created from the high slip experienced by the soft compound tyres can become lodged in the multiple elements of a front wing. This will lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of the wing over the course of a race. This work will study the effect of such debris, both experimentally and numerically, on an inverted double element wing in ground effect at representative Reynolds numbers. The wing was mounted at two different ride heights above a fixed false-floor in the Loughborough University wind tunnel and the effect of debris blockage modelled by closing sections of the gap between elements with tape.
Technical Paper

The Psychological and Statistical Design Method for Co-Creation HMI Applications in the Chinese Automotive Market

2017-03-28
2017-01-0650
The automotive industry is dramatically changing. Many automotive Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) proposed new prototype models or concept vehicles to promote a green vehicle image. Non-traditional players bring many latest technologies in the Information Technology (IT) industry to the automotive industry. Typical vehicle’s characteristics became wider compared to those of vehicles a decade ago, and they include not only a driving range, mileage per gallon and acceleration rating, but also many features adopted in the IT industry, such as usability, connectivity, vehicle software upgrade capability and backward compatibility. Consumers expect the latest technology features in vehicles as they enjoy in using digital applications in laptops and mobile phones. These features create a huge challenge for a design of a new vehicle, especially for a human-machine-interface (HMI) system.
Journal Article

Residual Stress Distributions in Rectangular Bars Due to High Rolling Loads

2016-04-05
2016-01-0424
In this paper, residual stress distributions in rectangular bars due to rolling or burnishing at very high rolling or burnishing loads are investigated by roll burnishing experiments and three-dimensional finite element analyses using ABAQUS. First, roll burnishing experiments on rectangular bars at two roller burnishing loads are presented. The results indicate the higher burnishing load induces lower residual stresses and the higher burnishing load does not improve fatigue lives. Next, in the corresponding finite element analyses, the roller is modeled as rigid and the roller rolls on the flat surface of the bar with a low coefficient of friction. The bar material is modeled as an elastic-plastic strain hardening material with a nonlinear kinematic hardening rule for loading and unloading.
Technical Paper

Numerical Simulations of a GDI Engine Flow Using LES and POD

2016-04-05
2016-01-0598
This paper presents the findings from a numerical study of a gasoline direct injection engine flow using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) modelling technique. The study is carried out over 30 successive engine cycles. The study illustrates how the more simple but robust Smagorinsky LES sub-grid scale turbulence model can be applied to a complex engine geometry with realistic engineering mesh size and computational expense whilst still meeting the filter width requirements to resolve the majority of large scale turbulent structures. Detailed description is provided here for the computational setup, including the initialisation strategy. The mesh is evaluated using a turbulence resolution parameter and shows the solution to generally resolve upwards of 80% of the turbulence kinetic energy.
Technical Paper

Aerodynamic Side Forces on Passenger Cars at Yaw

2016-04-05
2016-01-1620
Side force has an influence on the behaviour of passenger cars in windy conditions. It increases approximately linearly with yaw angle over a significant range of yaw for almost all cars and the side force derivative, (the gradient of side force coefficient with yaw angle), is similar for vehicles of a given category and size. The shape factors and components which affect side force for different vehicle types are discussed. The dominant influence on side force, for most cars, however, is shown to be the vehicle height which is consistent with slender wing theory if the car and its mirror image are considered. This simple theory is shown to apply to 1-box and 2- box shapes, covering most MPVs, hatchbacks and SUVs, but does not adequately represent the side forces on notchback and fastback car shapes. Data from simple bodies is used to develop a modification to the basic theory, which is applied to these vehicle types.
Technical Paper

Design for 6 Sigma Application in Engine System Integration

2015-09-29
2015-01-2864
With stringent emission regulations, many subsystems that abate engine tailpipe-out emissions become a necessary part for engines. The increased level of complexity poses technical challenges for the quality and reliability for modern engines. Among the spectrum of quality control methodologies, one conventional methodology focuses on every component's quality to ensure that the accumulative deviation is within predetermined limits. This conventional methodology tightens the component tolerance during the manufacturing process and typically results in increased cost. Another conventional methodology that is on the other side of the spectrum focuses on tailoring an engine calibration solution to offset the manufacturing differences. Although the tailored engine calibration solution reduces manufacturing cost for components, it increases the development and validation cost for engines. Given the cost and time constraints, system integration plays an important role in engine development.
Technical Paper

Automatic PI Controller Calibration Optimization using Model-Based Calibration Approach

2015-09-01
2015-01-1989
Model-based calibration (MBC) is a systematic method to calibrate an engine control unit (ECU) system. Due to the working principle of MBC, it is only being used for steady-state systems (time independent models). This limits the use of MBC; because an ECU contains statistical and dynamical systems. Due to the limitations of MBC, dynamical systems require manual tuning which may be time-consuming. With the increasing popularity in hybrid and electrical vehicle systems, most of them rely on dynamical systems. Therefore, MBC is about to be superseded by manual parameterization methods. Remarkably, MBC is not limited to the steady state systems. It can be achieved by separating the time factor of a system and extracting the statistical data from a time series measurement. Typically, MBC model is conceived as the representation of a system plant (i.e.: air path, fuel path, mean value engine model). As a matter of fact, MBC model is not limited to identification of system plant.
Journal Article

Obtaining Structure-borne Input for Hybrid FEA/SEA Engine Enclosure Models through a Simplified Transfer Path Analysis

2015-06-15
2015-01-2349
Structure-borne inputs to hybrid FEA/SEA models could have significant effects on the model prediction accuracy. The purpose of this work was to obtain the structure-borne noise (SBN) inputs using a simplified transfer path analysis (TPA) and identify the significance of the structure-borne and airborne contributions to the spectator sound power of an engine with enclosure for future modeling references. Force inputs to the enclosure from the engine were obtained and used as inputs to a hybrid engine enclosure model for sound prediction.
Technical Paper

Using a Statistical Machine Learning Tool for Diesel Engine Air Path Calibration

2014-09-30
2014-01-2391
A full calibration exercise of a diesel engine air path can take months to complete (depending on the number of variables). Model-based calibration approach can speed up the calibration process significantly. This paper discusses the overall calibration process of the air-path of the Cat® C7.1 engine using statistical machine learning tool. The standard Cat® C7.1 engine's twin-stage turbocharger was replaced by a VTG (Variable Turbine Geometry) as part of an evaluation of a novel air system. The changes made to the air-path system required a recalculation of the air path's boost set point and desired EGR set point maps. Statistical learning processes provided a firm basis to model and optimize the air path set point maps and allowed a healthy balance to be struck between the resources required for the exercise and the resulting data quality.
Technical Paper

The Potential of Fuel Metering Control for Optimising Unburned Hydrocarbon Emissions in Diesel Low Temperature Combustion

2013-04-08
2013-01-0894
Low temperature combustion (LTC) in diesel engines offers attractive benefits through simultaneous reduction of nitrogen oxides and soot. However, it is known that the in-cylinder conditions typical of LTC operation tend to produce high emissions of unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO), reducing combustion efficiency. The present study develops from the hypothesis that this characteristic poor combustion efficiency is due to in-cylinder mixture preparation strategies that are non-optimally matched to the requirements of the LTC combustion mode. In this work, the effects of three key fuel path parameters - injection fuel quantity ratio, dwell and injection timing - on CO and HC emissions were examined using a Central Composite Design (CCD) Design of Experiments (DOE) method.
Technical Paper

Interaction Between Ceramic Matrix Composite and Organic Pad Materials and its Impact on the Friction Performance

2011-09-18
2011-01-2350
Ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been increasingly used as alternative materials of the rotors of friction brakes. However there is still a need for a better understanding of fundamentals of CMC rotors and their associated friction materials. In this paper, the friction performance at the initial stage was characterized by testing on a laboratory-scale dynamometer and a car for brakes consisting of rotors made of carbon-fiber-reinforced carbon-silicon carbide (Cf/C-SiC) composite, and pads with organic liners. The characteristics of friction surface and its evolution were studied through focused imaging on the surface of the rotor after testing on the dynamometer. Both dynamometer and vehicle tests showed that bedding was essential to reach the required coefficient of friction (CoF). Sustainable transfer layer was successfully deposited on the surface of silicon in the early stage of bedding, but the deposition became difficult on that of carbon constituents and silicon carbide.
Technical Paper

Analytical Evaluation of Fitted Piston Compression Ring: Modal Behaviour and Frictional Assessment

2011-05-17
2011-01-1535
Piston compression rings are thin, incomplete circular structures which are subject to complex motions during a typical 4-stroke internal combustion engine cycle. Ring dynamics comprises its inertial motion relative to the piston, within the confine of its seating groove. There are also elastodynamic modes, such as the ring in-plane motions. A number of modes can be excited, dependent on the net applied force. The latter includes the ring tension and cylinder pressure loading, both of which act outwards on the ring and conform it to the cylinder bore. There is also the radial inward force as the result of ring-bore conjunctional pressure (i.e. contact force). Under transient conditions, the inward and outward forces do not equilibrate, resulting in the small inertial radial motion of the ring.
Technical Paper

Identification and Reduction of Booming Noise on a Motor Grader

2011-05-17
2011-01-1729
NVH is gaining importance in the quality perception of off-highway machines' performance and operator comfort. Booming noise, a low frequency NVH phenomenon, can be a significant sound issue in a motor grader when it is used under certain operating conditions that cause low frequency excitations to the machine. In order to increase operator comfort by decreasing the noise levels and noise annoyance, both simulation and testing techniques were leveraged to reduce the booming noise of a motor grader. Simultaneous structural/acoustics simulations and experimental modal tests were performed to evaluate this phenomenon. The simulation models were validated using test results and then used to evaluate solutions to this noise problem. Further field tests confirmed the validity of these recommended solutions.
Technical Paper

Moving Toward Establishing More Robust and Systematic Model Development for IC Engines Using Process Informatics

2010-04-12
2010-01-0152
Analyzing the combustion characteristics, engine performance, and emissions pathways of the internal combustion (IC) engine requires management of complex and an increasing quantity of data. With this in mind, effective management to deliver increased knowledge from these data over shorter timescales is a priority for development engineers. This paper describes how this can be achieved by combining conventional engine research methods with the latest developments in process informatics and statistical analysis. Process informatics enables engineers to combine data, instrumental and application models to carry out automated model development including optimization and validation against large data repositories of experimental data.
Technical Paper

Failure Analysis of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

2008-04-14
2008-01-0634
A qualitative FMEA study of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) technology is established and presented in the current work through a literature survey of mechanisms that govern performance degradation and failure. The literature findings are translated into Fault Tree (FT) diagrams that depict how basic events can develop into performance degradation or failure in the context of the following top events; (1) activation losses; (2) mass transportation losses; (3) Ohmic losses; (4) efficiency losses and (5) catastrophic cell failure. Twenty-two identified faults and forty-seven frequent causes are translated into fifty-two basic events and a system of FTs with twenty-one reoccurring dominant mechanisms. The four most dominant mechanisms discussed that currently curtail sustained fuel cell performance relate to membrane durability, liquid water formation, flow-field design, and manufacturing practices.
Technical Paper

CFD Modeling of the Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer for Piston Gallery Cooling System

2007-10-29
2007-01-4128
Numerical models are used in this study to investigate the oil flow and heat transfer in the piston gallery of a diesel engine. An experiment is set up to validate the numerical models. In the experiment a fixed, but adjustable steel plate is instrumented and pre-heated to a certain temperature. The oil is injected vertically upwards from an underneath injector and impinges on the bottom of the plate. The reduction of the plate temperature is recorded by the thermocouples pre-mounted in the plate. The numerical models are used to predict the temperature history at the thermocouple locations and validated with the experimental data. After the rig model validation, the numerical models are applied to evaluate the oil sloshing and heat transfer in the piston gallery. The piston motion is modeled by a dynamic mesh model, and the oil sloshing is modeled by the VOF (volume of fluid) multiphase model.
Technical Paper

Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis of Diesel Engine Cylinder Head Gasket Joints

1993-09-01
932456
A nonlinear, three-dimensional finite element analysis of the cylinder head gasket joint has been developed to allow accurate prediction of global and local joint behavior during engine operation. Nonlinear material properties and load cases that simulate full cycle engine operation are the analysis foundation. The three-dimensional, nonlinear, full-cycle simulation accurately predicts cylinder head gasket joint response to assembly, thermal, and cylinder pressure loading. Predictions correlate well with measured engine test data. Analysis results include local pressure distribution and global load splits. Insight into joint loading and an improved understanding of overall joint behavior provide the basis for informed design and development decisions.
Technical Paper

Numerical Simulation of Quenching Process at Caterpillar

1993-04-01
931172
Caterpillar uses heat treatment to enhance the properties of a significant number of parts. Traditional heat treat process optimization is both time consuming and expensive when done by empirical methods. This paper describes a computer simulation of the heat treatment process, developed by Caterpillar, based upon finite element analysis. This approach combines thermal, microstructural, and stress analysis to accurately model material transformation during quenching. Examples are presented to illustrate the program.
Technical Paper

HEUI - A New Direction for Diesel Engine Fuel Systems

1993-03-01
930270
Caterpillar Inc. has developed a new diesel engine fuel system, powered by hydraulics and controlled electronically. This Hydraulic Electronic Unit Injector, (HEUI), requires no mechanical actuating or mechanical control devices, and offers many advantages over conventional fuel injection systems. Inherent features of the HEUI Fuel System include injection pressure control independent of engine load or speed, totally flexible injection timing, and full electronic control of injection parameters. Packaging the HEUI Fuel System on an engine is simple, as the injector is compact and available in a variety of configurations. The hydraulic actuating circuit is straightforward, using lubricating oil from the engine sump. Hydraulic lines may be internal to the engine or external. This paper describes the Caterpillar HEUI Fuel System, its operating features, performance advantages, and application to diesel engines.
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