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Technical Paper

Prestrain Effect on Fatigue of DP600 Sheet Steel

2007-04-16
2007-01-0995
The component being formed experiences some type of prestrain that may have an effect on its fatigue strength. This study investigated the forming effects on material fatigue strength of dual phase sheet steel (DP600) subjected to various uniaxial prestrains. In the as-received condition, DP600 specimens were tested for tensile properties to determine the prestraining level based on the uniform elongation corresponding to the maximum strength of DP600 on the stress-strain curve. Three different levels of prestrain at 90%, 70% and 50% of the uniform elongation were applied to uniaxial prestrain specimens for tensile tests and fatigue tests. Fatigue tests were conducted with strain controlled to obtain fatigue properties and compare them with the as-received DP600. The fatigue test results were presented with strain amplitude and Neuber's factor.
Technical Paper

Fatigue Strength Effect of Thread Forming Process in Cast Aluminum

2006-04-03
2006-01-0780
Two thread forming processes, rolling and cutting, were studied for their effects on fatigue in cast aluminum 319-T7. Material was excised from cylinder blocks and tested in rotating-bending fatigue in the form of unnotched and notched specimens. The notched specimens were prepared by either rolling or cutting to replicate threads in production-intent parts. Cut threads exhibited conventional notch behavior for notch sensitive materials. In contrast, plastic deformation induced by rolling created residual compressive stresses in the notch root and significantly improved fatigue strength to the point that most of the rolled specimens broke outside the notch. Fractographic and metallographic investigation showed that cracks at the root of rolled notches were deflected upon initiation. This lengthened their incubation period, which effectively increased fatigue resistance.
Technical Paper

Vehicle Component Fatigue Analysis Considering Largest Overall Loop for Multiple Surfaces

2006-04-03
2006-01-0979
In the automotive industry, vehicle durability analysis is based on test schedule encompassing multiple road surfaces (events) including rough roads, potholes, etc. Traditionally, in the Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) world, road load data for various road surfaces are measured/predicted and fatigue life is predicted for each individual road surface. Fatigue life for the complete test schedule is then calculated with Miner’s rule by summing fatigue damage for each road surface with an appropriate number of repetitions. A major pitfall of this approach is that it does not consider the effect of the largest rainflow range across the entire test schedule. The method described in this paper was developed to perform fatigue analysis of structures subjected to diverse road surfaces and also consider the case in which the maximum overall peak and minimum overall valley do not occur over the same road surface.
Technical Paper

Examining Specimen Bending Strain and Computing Misalignment Correction for Axial Load Frame Material Testing

2005-04-11
2005-01-0804
Specimen grips in an axial load frame typically have a small misalignment that imposes bending strain on the clamped specimen. The bending strain causes variability in the material test results, especially in fatigue testing of brittle materials. This paper introduces new techniques for aiding load frame alignment. Examining the source of the bending strain identifies how much of the bending strain is due to the specimen imperfections versus the machine misalignment. Quantifying the misalignment components provides criteria for automating the setscrew adjustment selection of the alignment process.
Technical Paper

Sensitivity Study of Staircase Fatigue Tests Using Monte Carlo Simulation

2005-04-11
2005-01-0803
The staircase fatigue test method is a well-established, but poorly understood probe for determining fatigue strength mean and standard deviation. The sensitivity of results to underlying distributions was studied using Monte Carlo simulation by repeatedly sampling known distributions of hypothetical fatigue strength data with the staircase test method. In this paper, the effects of the underlying distribution on staircase test results are presented with emphasis on original normal, lognormal, Weibull and bimodal data. The results indicate that the mean fatigue strength determined by the staircase testing protocol is largely unaffected by the underlying distribution, but the standard deviation is not. Suggestions for conducting staircase tests are provided.
Technical Paper

Automation of Structural Fatigue/Reliability Assessment Using iSIGHT, MSC/Nastran and nCode

2005-04-11
2005-01-0823
The goal was to automate the entire analytical process of structural fatigue life variation assessment with respect to the variations associated with the geometry such as thickness, material properties and loading conditions. Consequently, the structural reliability is evaluated systematically. This process automation has been realized by using an internally developed software package called Structural Fatigue/Reliability Sensitivity II (i.e. FRS II). The package is a bundle of MSC/Nastran, nCode, iSIGHT, and internally developed program scripts.
Technical Paper

Full Vehicle Finite Element Model 4-Post Durability Analysis

2005-04-11
2005-01-1402
4-Post durability test simulations using a nonlinear FEA model have been executed by engineers responsible for structural durability performance and validation. An integrated Body and Chassis, full FEA model has been used. All components of the test load input were screened and only the most damaging events were incorporated in the simulation. These events included the Potholes, Belgian Block Tracks, Chatter Bump Stops, Twist Ditches, and Driveway Ramps. The CAE technology Virtual Proving Ground (eta/VPG®*) was used to model the full system and the 4-Post test fixtures. The nonlinear dynamic FE solver LS-DYNA** was used in this analysis. The fatigue damage of each selected event was calculated separately and then added together according to the test schedule. Due to the lack of stress/strain information from hardware test, only the analyzed fatigue damage results of the baseline model were scaled to correlate with physical test data.
Technical Paper

Development of the SAE Biaxial Wheel Test Load File

2004-03-08
2004-01-1578
Recently published SAE Recommended Practice J2562 - SAE Biaxial Wheel Test standardized the terminology, equipment, and test procedure for the biaxial wheel test. This test was originally presented by Fraunhofer Institut Betriebsfestigkeit - LBF (Fraunhofer Institute for Structural Durability) in SAE paper 830135 “Automotive Wheels, Method and Procedure for Optimal Design and Testing”. The first release of SAE J2562 included a generic, scalable load file applicable to wheels designed for five to eight passenger vehicles with capacity to carry a proportional amount of luggage or ballast. Future releases of SAE J2562 would include two additional load files; one applicable to light trucks that have substantial cargo capacity and one for sports cars typically limited to two passengers and marginal luggage. This report details the process used to develop the SAE Biaxial Wheel Test Load File for passenger vehicles.
Technical Paper

A Dynamic Durability Analysis Method and Application to a Battery Support Subsystem

2004-03-08
2004-01-0874
The battery support in a small car is an example of a subsystem that lends itself to mounted component dynamic fatigue analysis, due to its weight and localized attachments. This paper describes a durability analysis method that was developed to define the required enforced motion, stress response, and fatigue life for such subsystems. The method combines the large mass method with the modal transient formulation to determine the dynamic stress responses. The large mass method was selected over others for its ease of use and efficiency when working with the modal formulation and known accelerations from a single driving point. In this example, these known accelerations were obtained from the drive files of a 4-DOF shake table that was used for corresponding lab tests of a rear compartment body structure. These drive files, originally displacements, were differentiated twice and filtered to produce prescribed accelerations to the finite element model.
Technical Paper

Discussion of Fatigue Analysis Techniques in Automotive Applications

2004-03-08
2004-01-0626
This paper is targeted to engineers who are involved in predicting fatigue life using either the strain-life approach or the stress-life approach. However, more emphasis is given to the strain-life approach, which is commonly used for fatigue life analysis in the ground vehicle industry. It attempts to discuss, modify and extend approaches in fatigue analysis, so they are best suited for structural durability engineers. Fatigue analysis requires the use of material fatigue properties, stress or strain results obtained from finite element analyses or measurements, and load data obtained from multi-body dynamic analysis or road load data acquisition. This paper examines the effects of these variables in predicting fatigue life. Various mean stress corrections, along with their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Different stress/strain combinations such as signed von Mises, and signed Tresca are examined. Also, advanced methods such as Fatemi-Socie and Bannantine are discussed.
Technical Paper

Quasi-Static and Impact Strength of Fatigue Damaged Spot Welds

2003-03-03
2003-01-0610
As the automotive industry becomes more concerned with the crash performance of automobiles, the behavior of used vehicles becomes an interesting subject. In this work, the effect of aging on spot welded joints was simulated by applying fatigue loading to the samples. Samples were then subjected to quasi-static and impact tests to measure the effect of fatigue aging to the strength of the samples. The results show (a) a reduction in the strength of the test samples under impact conditions, (b) no obvious reduction in quasi-static conditions, and (c) significant reduction in strength if cracks in the welds were initiated during the fatigue aging process.
Technical Paper

Accurate Shock Absorber Load Modeling in an All Terrain Vehicle using Black Box Neural Network Techniques

2002-03-04
2002-01-0581
This paper presents the results of a study of using a neural network black box model of a shock absorber of an ATV (All Terrain Vehicle, four wheel drive, off road, single person vehicle) for accurate load modeling. This study is part of a larger investigation into the dynamic behavior and associated fatigue of an ATV vehicle, which is conducted under the auspices of the Fatigue Design and Evaluation Committee of SAE of North America (www.fatigue.org). The general objectives are to develop new correlated methodologies that will allow engineers to predict the durability of components of proposed vehicles by means of a “digital prototype” simulation. Current state of the art multi body dynamics predictions use linear frequency response functions or non-linear polynomial approximations to describe the behavior of non-linear suspension components such as shock absorbers or bushings.
Technical Paper

Residual Forming Effects on Full Vehicle Frontal Impact and Body-in-White Durability Analyses

2002-03-04
2002-01-0640
Forming of sheet metal structures induces pre-strains, thickness variations, and residual stresses. Pre-strains in the formed structures introduce work hardening effects and change material fatigue properties such as stress-life or strain-life. In the past, crashworthiness and durability analyses have been carried out using uniform sheet thickness and stress- and strain-free initial conditions. In this paper, crashworthiness and durability analyses of hydroformed front rails, stamped engine rails and shock towers on a full vehicle and a Body-In-White structure are performed considering the residual forming effects. The forming effects on the crash performance and fatigue life are evaluated.
Technical Paper

Application of Elastomeric Components for Noise and Vibration Isolation in the Automotive Industry

2001-04-30
2001-01-1447
Elastomeric isolators are used in a variety of different applications to reduce noise and vibration. To use isolators effectively requires the product design and development engineer to satisfy multiple objectives, which typically include packaging restrictions, environmental criteria, limitations on motion control, load requirements, and minimum fatigue life, in addition to vibration isolation performance. An understanding of elastomeric material properties and the methods used to characterize elastomeric component behavior is necessary to achieve desired performance. Typical design criteria and functional objectives for various isolator applications, including powertrain mounts, suspension control arm bushings, shock absorber bushings, exhaust hangers, flexible couplings, cradle mounts, body mounts and vibration dampers are also discussed.
Technical Paper

An Application for Fatigue Damage Analysis Using Power Spectral Density from Road Durability Events

1998-02-23
980689
A method is presented to process random vibration data from a complete road durability test environment as stationary segments and then develop test profiles based on fatigue content of their power spectral densities. Background is provided on existing techniques for estimating fatigue damage in the frequency domain. A general model for stress response to acceleration is offered to address the vibration test's requirement for acceleration data and the fatigue prediction method's requirement for stress data. With these tools, the engineer can extend test correlation beyond failure modes to include retention of estimated fatigue damage. Recommendations allow for test time compression from editing and improve existing exaggeration methods.
Technical Paper

The Use of Fatigue Sensitive Critical Locations in Correlation of Vehicle Simulation and In-Service Environments

1988-04-01
880807
A major challenge facing the vehicle simulation test laboratory is correlating (and thereby validating) the simulated “test track” with the In-service environment. This simulation is key to the use of data for durability analysis from the integrated design and testing engineering process. Presented here is an approach to integrating road simulation test and fatigue life analysis that produces needed results for test, design and analysis engineers. The core of the analysis is a fatigue-based “rig-to-road” comparison for an on-highway vehicle using strain-time data acquired at fatigue sensitive locations. The cyclic and fatigue damaging content of the field and simulation profiles are compared quantitatively for purposes of validating the laboratory lest, and to illustrate a method of reporting this validation to design and analysis engineers.
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