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Technical Paper

Comparative Corrosion Assessment of Coated Alloys for Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicle Architectures

2015-04-14
2015-01-0738
The purpose of this study was to conduct a comparative corrosion assessment of alloys and coating schemes of interest for the fabrication of multi-material lightweight vehicle architectures. Alloys considered for this application included galvanized high strength low alloy steel, aluminum alloy AA6111 and magnesium alloy ZEK100. The coating scheme considered for corrosion protection included a layered paint top-coat scheme that was applied to a pre-treated surface. The pre-treatments included an alloy-specific commercial conversion coating (CC) and a plasma electrolytic deposition (PED) process that was applied only to the ZEK100 material. The corrosion assessment of the scribed coated alloy panels was conducted after 1000 h exposure in the ASTM B117 salt fog environment. Characterization of the mode and extent of corrosion damage observed and the role played by the exposed alloy microstructure utilized both light optical microscopy and electron microscopy.
Journal Article

Fracture Characterization of Automotive Alloys in Shear Loading

2015-04-14
2015-01-0528
Two different shear sample geometries were employed to investigate the elastoplastic and failure behaviour of three automotive alloy rolled sheets; a highly anisotropic magnesium alloy (ZEK100) and two relatively isotropic dual phase steels (DP600 and DP780). The performance of the so-called butterfly type specimen (Mohr and Henn 2007, Dunand and Mohr 2011) was evaluated at quasi-static conditions along with the shear geometry of Peirs et al. (2012) using in situ 3-D digital image correlation (DIC) strain measurement techniques. It was shown that both test geometries resulted in similar trends of the load-displacement response; however, the fracture strains obtained using the butterfly specimen were lower for the ZEK100 and DP780. It was demonstrated that the ZEK100 exhibits strong anisotropy in terms of the shear work hardening rate and failure strain.
Technical Paper

MMLV: Chassis Design and Component Testing

2015-04-14
2015-01-1237
The Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) developed by Magna International and Ford Motor Company is a result of a US Department of Energy project DE-EE0005574. The project demonstrates the lightweighting potential of a five passenger sedan, while maintaining vehicle performance and occupant safety. Prototype vehicles were manufactured and limited full vehicle testing was conducted. The Mach-I vehicle design, comprised of commercially available materials and production processes, achieved a 364kg (23.5%) full vehicle mass reduction, enabling the application of a 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine resulting in a significant environmental benefits and fuel consumption reduction. As part of this project, several automotive chassis components were selected for development and evaluation on the MMLV C/D segment passenger sedan.
Technical Paper

MMLV: Automatic Transmission Lightweighting

2015-04-14
2015-01-1240
This paper details the lightweighting efforts of the Ford Research & Advanced Transmission team as part of the Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle Project. The Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) developed by Magna International and Ford Motor Company is a result of a US Department of Energy project DE-EE0005574. The project demonstrates the lightweighting potential of a five passenger sedan, while maintaining vehicle performance and occupant safety. Prototype vehicles were manufactured and limited full vehicle testing was conducted. The Mach-I vehicle design, comprised of commercially available materials and production processes, achieved a 364kg (23.5%) full vehicle mass reduction, enabling the application of a 1.0-liter three cylinder engine resulting in a significant environmental benefits and fuel consumption reduction.
Technical Paper

MMLV: Door Design and Component Testing

2015-04-14
2015-01-0409
The Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) developed by Magna International and Ford Motor Company is a result of a US Department of Energy project DE-EE0005574. The project demonstrates the lightweighting potential of a five passenger sedan, while maintaining vehicle performance and occupant safety. Prototype vehicles were manufactured and limited full vehicle testing was conducted. The Mach-I vehicle design, comprised of commercially available materials and production processes, achieved a 364kg (23.5%) full vehicle mass reduction, enabling the application of a 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine resulting in a significant environmental benefit and fuel reduction. This paper reviews the mass reduction and structural performance of aluminum, magnesium, and steel components for a lightweight multi material door design for a C/D segment passenger vehicle. Stiffness, durability, and crash requirements are assessed.
Technical Paper

BIW Design and CAE

2015-04-14
2015-01-0408
The Multi Material Lightweight Vehicle (MMLV) developed by Magna International and Ford Motor Company is a result of US Department of Energy project DE-EE0005574. The project demonstrates the light weighting potential of a five passenger sedan, while maintaining vehicle performance and occupant safety. Prototype vehicles were manufactured and limited full vehicle testing was conducted. The Mach-I vehicle design, comprised of commercially available materials and production processes, achieved a 364kg (23.5%) full vehicle mass reduction, enabling the application of a 1.0-liter three-cylinder engine resulting in a significant environmental benefit and fuel reduction. This paper includes details associated with the mass reduction and structural performance of the multi material body in white (BIW) relative to a C/D segment production vehicle. Selected stiffness, durability and crash requirements are assessed.
Technical Paper

Definitions and Methods for Worst Case Materials in Formability Simulations

2012-04-16
2012-01-0017
Two types of approaches for material definitions and methods for worst case scenarios are explored. The first is from the material specification supplied by the OEM or the alloy producer for the material, which has basic material properties and no specific FLC. The potential exists that any material within the specification can be delivered to the stamping plants. The second is if the material is to be supplied within a narrowed band of material specification with a known FLC. For both cases, there is considerable pressure from product design to use the most formable material possible. However, if a material is delivered outside the FEA testing limits, the results can be catastrophic. A specification is proposed to take advantage of the formability capability to enhance product performance while minimizing stamping plant risk.
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