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Technical Paper

Performance of Next Generation Gasoline Particulate Filter Materials under RDE Conditions

2019-04-02
2019-01-0980
In order to meet the challenging CO2 targets beyond 2020 without sacrificing performance, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) technology, in combination with turbo charging technology, is expanding in the automotive industry. However, while this technology does provide a significant CO2 reduction, one side effect is increased Particle Number (PN) emission. As a result, from September 2017, GDI vehicles in Europe are required to meet the stringent PN emission limits of 6x1011 #/km under the Worldwide harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure (WLTP). In addition, it is required to meet PN emission of 9x1011 #/km under Real Driving Emission (RDE) testing, which includes a Conformity Factor (CF) of 1.5 to account for current measurement inaccuracies on the road. This introduction of RDE testing in Europe and China will especially provide a unique challenge for the design of exhaust after-treatment systems due to its wide boundary conditions.
Technical Paper

Development of Improved SCRonDPF Design for Future Tighter Regulations and Reduced System Packaging

2018-04-03
2018-01-0344
With the push towards more stringent on-road US heavy duty diesel regulations (i.e. HD GHG Phase 2 and the proposed ARB 20 mg/bhp-hr NOx), emission system packaging has grown critical while improving fuel economy and NOx emissions. The ARB regulations are expected to be implemented post 2023 while regulation for EU off-road segment will begin from 2019. The regulation, called Stage V, will introduce particle number (PN) regulation requiring EU OEMs to introduce a diesel particulate filter (DPF) while customer demands will require the OEMs to maintain current emission system packaging. A viable market solution to meet these requirements, especially for EU Stage V being implemented first, is a DPF coated with a selective catalyst reduction (SCR) washcoat (i.e. SCRonDPF).
Technical Paper

Particle Number Emission Reduction for GDI Engines with Gasoline Particulate Filters

2017-10-08
2017-01-2378
In order to meet the challenging CO2 targets beyond 2020 despite keeping high performance engines, Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) technology usually combined with charged aspiration is expanding in the automotive industry. While providing more efficient powertrains to reduce fuel consumption one side effect of GDI is the increased particle formation during the combustion process. For the first time for GDI from September 2014 there is a Particle Number (PN) limit in EU of 6x10 sup 12 #/km, which will be further reduced by one order of magnitude to 6x10 sup 11 #/km effective from September 2017 to be the same level as applied to Diesel engines. In addition to the PN limit of the certification cycle NEDC further certification of Real Driving Emissions (RDE) including portable PN measurements are under discussion by the European Commission. RDE test procedure requires stable and low emissions in a wide range of engine operations and durable over a distance of 160 000 km.
Technical Paper

Alternative Particle Number Filtration Performance Test Method

2017-03-28
2017-01-0983
Particle Number (PN) regulation was firstly introduced for European light-duty diesel vehicles back in 2011[1]. Since then, PN regulation has been and is being expanded to heavy-duty diesel vehicles and non-road diesel machineries. PN regulation will also be expanded to China and India around 2020 or later. Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) is significant factor for the above-mentioned PN regulation. This filter technology is to be continuously evolved for the near future tighter PN regulation. Generally, PN filtration performance test for filter technology development is carried out with chassis dynamometer, engine dynamometer or simulator [2]. This paper describes a simplified and relatively quicker alternative PN filtration performance test method for accelerating filter technology development compared to the current test method.
Technical Paper

Development of New High Porosity Diesel Particulate Filter for Integrated SCR Technology/Catalyst

2015-09-01
2015-01-2018
Diesel engines are widely used to reduce CO2 emission due to its higher thermal efficiency over gasoline engines. Considering long term CO2 targets, as well as tighter gas emission, especially NOx, diesel engines must become cleaner and more efficient. However, there is a tradeoff between CO2 and NOx and, naturally, engine developers choose lower CO2 because NOx can be reduced by a catalytic converter, such as a SCR catalyst. Lower CO2 engine calibration, unfortunately, leads to lower exhaust gas temperatures, which delays the activation of the catalytic converter. In order to overcome both problems, higher engine out NOx emission and lower exhaust gas temperatures, close-coupled a diesel particulate filter (DPF) system with integration of SCR catalyst technology is preferred. For SCR catalyst activity, it is known that the catalyst loading amount has an influence on NOx performance, so a high SCR catalyst loading will be required.
Journal Article

Development of New High Porosity Diesel Particulate Filter for Integrated SCR Technology/Catalyst

2015-04-14
2015-01-1017
Since the implementation of Euro 6 in September 2014, diesel engines are facing another drastic reduction of NOx emission limits from 180 to only 80 mg/km during NEDC and real driving emissions (RDE) are going to be monitored until limit values are enforced from September 2017. Considering also long term CO2 targets of 95 g/km beyond 2020, diesel engines must become cleaner and more efficient. However, there is a tradeoff between NOx and CO2 and, naturally, engine developers choose lower CO2 because NOx can be reduced by additional devices such as EGR or a catalytic converter. Lower CO2 engine calibration, unfortunately, leads to lower exhaust gas temperatures, which delays the activation of the catalytic converter. In order to overcome both problems, higher NOx engine out emission and lower exhaust gas temperatures, new aftertreatment systems will incorporate close-coupled DeNOx systems.
Technical Paper

Next Generation of Ceramic Wall Flow Gasoline Particulate Filter with Integrated Three Way Catalyst

2015-04-14
2015-01-1073
A Particle Number (PN) limit for Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI) vehicles was introduced in Europe from September 2014 (Euro 6b). In addition, further certification to Real Driving Emissions (RDE) is planned [1] [2], which requires low and stable emissions in a wide range of engine operation, which must be durable for at least 160,000 km. To achieve such stringent targets, a ceramic wall-flow Gasoline Particulate Filter (GPF) is one potential emission control device. This paper focuses on a catalyzed GPF, combining particle trapping and catalytic conversion into a single device. The main parameters to be considered when introducing this technology are filtration efficiency, pressure drop and catalytic conversion. This paper portrays a detailed study starting from the choice of material recipe, design optimization, engine bench evaluation, and final validation inside a standard vehicle from the market during an extensive field test up to 160,000 km on public roads.
Technical Paper

Influence of Material Properties and Pore Design Parameters on Non-Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter Performance with Ash Accumulation

2012-09-10
2012-01-1728
Diesel particulate filters (DPF) are a common component in emission-control systems of modern clean diesel vehicles. Several DPF materials have been used in various applications. Silicone Carbide (SiC) is common for passenger vehicles because of its thermal robustness derived from its high specific gravity and heat conductivity. However, a segmented structure is required to relieve thermal stress due to SiC's higher coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Cordierite (Cd) is a popular material for heavy-duty vehicles. Cordierite which has less mass per given volume, exhibits superior light-off performance, and is also adequate for use in larger monolith structures, due to its lower CTE. SiC and cordierite are recognized as the most prevalent DPF materials since the 2000's. The DPF traps not only combustible particles (soot) but also incombustible ash. Ash accumulates in the DPF and remains in the filter until being physically removed.
Technical Paper

Potential of a Low Pressure Drop Filter Concept for Direct Injection Gasoline Engines to Reduce Particulate Number Emission

2012-04-16
2012-01-1241
The automotive industry is currently evaluating the gasoline particulate filter (GPF) as a potential technology to reduce particulate emissions from gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. In this paper, several GPF design measures which were taken to obtain a filter with lower pressure drop when compared to our previous concept will be presented. Based on engine test bench and vehicle test results, it was determined some soot will accumulate on the GPF walls, resulting in an increase in pressure drop. However, the accumulated soot will be combusted under high temperature and high O₂ concentration conditions. In a typical vehicle application, passive regeneration will likely occur and a cycle of soot accumulation and combustion might be repeated in the actual driving conditions.
Technical Paper

Newly Developed Cordierite Honeycomb Substrate for SCR Coating Realizing System Compactness and Low Backpressure

2012-04-16
2012-01-1079
Ammonia Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and Lean NOx Trap (LNT) systems are key technologies to reduce NOx emission for diesel on-highway vehicles to meet worldwide tighter emission regulations. In addition DeNOx catalysts have already been applied to several commercial off-road applications. Adding the DeNOx catalyst to existing Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) and Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) emission control system requires additional space and will result in an increase of emission system back pressure. Therefore it is necessary to address optimizing the DeNOx catalyst in regards to back pressure and downsizing. Recently, extruded zeolite for DeNOx application has been considered. This technology improves NOx conversion at low temperature due to the high catalyst amount. However, this technology has concerned about strength and robustness, because the honeycomb body is composed of catalyst.
Technical Paper

High Porosity DPF Design for Integrated SCR Functions

2012-04-16
2012-01-0843
Diesel engines are more fuel efficient due to their high thermal efficiency, compared to gasoline engines and therefore, have a higher potential to reduce CO2 emissions. Since diesel engines emit higher amounts of Particulate Matter (PM), DPF systems have been introduced. Today, DPF systems have become a standard technology. Nevertheless, with more stringent NOx emission limits and CO2 targets, additional NOx emission control is needed. For high NOx conversion efficiency, SCR catalysts technology shows high potential. Due to higher temperature at the close coupled position and space restrictions, an integrated SCR concept on the DPFs is preferred. A high SCR catalyst loading will be required to have high conversion efficiency over a wide range of engine operations which causes high pressure for conventional DPF materials.
Video

New Particulate Matter Sensor for On Board Diagnosis

2012-02-16
The presentation describes technology developments and the integration of these technologies into new emission control systems. As in other years, the reader will find a wide range of topics from various parts of the world. This is reflective of the worldwide scope and effort to reduce diesel exhaust emissions. Topics include the integration of various diesel particulate matter (PM) and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) technologies as well as sensors and other emissions related developments. Presenter Atsuo Kondo, NGK Insulators, Ltd.
Journal Article

New Particulate Matter Sensor for On Board Diagnosis

2011-04-12
2011-01-0302
The reduction of greenhouse gas is becoming increasingly important for humankind, and vehicles with low CO₂ emissions have a part to play in any reduction initiatives. Diesel engines emit 30% less CO₂ than gasoline engines, so diesel engines will make an important contribution to the overall decrease. Unfortunately diesel exhaust gas contains particulate matter (PM) which may cause health problems, and such PM emissions are regulated by law. In order to reduce PM, especially soot, diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are widely fitted to diesel vehicles. A DPF can remove more than 99% by weight of soot from exhaust gas under normal operating conditions, and they are one of the most important methods to achieve any regulation targets. But if the system malfunctions, the PM emissions may exceed the regulation limit. To detect such PM leakage, on-board diagnostics (OBD) are required.
Technical Paper

Study on Next Generation Diesel Particulate Filter

2009-04-20
2009-01-0292
Although diesel engines are superior to gasoline engines in terms of the demand to reduce CO2 emissions, diesel engines suffer from the problem of emitting Particulate Matter (PM). Therefore, a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) has to be fitted in the engine exhaust aftertreatment system. From the viewpoint of reducing CO2 emissions, there is a strong demand to reduce the exhaust system pressure drop and for DPF designs that are able to help reduce the pressure drop. A wall flow DPF having a novel wall pore structure design for reducing pressure drop, increasing robustness and increasing filtration efficiency is presented. The filter offers a linear relationship between PM loading and pressure drop, offering lower pressure drop and greater accuracy in estimating the accumulated PM amount from pressure drop. First, basic experiments were performed on small plate test samples having various pore structure designs.
Technical Paper

Study on Wall Pore Structure for Next Generation Diesel Particulate Filter

2008-04-14
2008-01-0618
A wall flow diesel particulate filter (DPF) having a novel wall pore structure design for reducing backpressure, increasing robustness, and increasing filtration efficiency is presented. The filter offers a linear relationship between soot loading and backpressure, offering greater accuracy in estimating the amount of soot loading from backpressure. Basic experiments were performed on small plate test pieces having various pore structure designs. Soot generated by a Cast-2F propane burner having a controlled size distribution was used. Cold flow test equipment that was carefully designed for flow distribution and soot/air mixing was used for precise measurement of backpressure during soot loading. The upstream and downstream PM numbers were counted by Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) to determine soot concentration in the gas flow and filtration efficiency of the test pieces. Microscope observations of the soot trapped in the wall were also carried out.
Technical Paper

Filtration Behavior of Diesel Particulate Filters (2)

2007-04-16
2007-01-0923
Due to its better fuel efficiency and low CO2 emissions, the number of diesel engine vehicles is increasing worldwide. Since they have high Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, tighter emission regulations will be enforced in Europe, the US, and Japan over the coming years. The Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) has made it possible to meet the tighter regulations and Silicon Carbide and Cordierite DPF's have been applied to various vehicles from passenger cars to heavy-duty trucks. However, it has been reported that nano-size PM has a harmful effect on human health. Therefore, it is desirable that PM regulations should be tightened. This paper will describe the influence of the DPF material characteristics on PM filtration efficiency and emissions levels, in addition to pressure drop.
Technical Paper

Filtration Behavior of Diesel Particulate Filters (1)

2007-04-16
2007-01-0921
This paper is Part-1 of two papers discussing the filtration behavior of diesel particulate filters. Results of the fundamental study are presented in Part-1, and test results for real size DPFs are reported in the supplement, Part-2. In this paper, a fundamental experimental study was performed on the effect of pore size and pore size distribution on the PM filtration efficiency of the ceramic, wall-flow Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF). Small round plates of various average mean pore sizes (4.6, 9.4, 11.7, 17.7 micro-meters) with a narrow pore size distribution were manufactured for the tests. During the DPF filtration efficiency tests, ZnCl2 particles in the range of 10 nm to 500 nm were used instead of PM from actual diesel engine exhaust. ZnCl2 particles were made using an infrared furnace and separated into monodisperse particles by DMA (Differential Mobility Analyzer).
Technical Paper

The Study for Structural Design of the Segmented SiC-DPF

2006-04-03
2006-01-1527
The application of Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF's) is expanding in the European, Japanese and US markets to comply with the tighter PM regulations. SiC DPF's, featuring greater robustness, have been applied extensively to passenger cars and are expanding into larger sizes for Light Duty Trucks applications. The SiC-DPF has higher mechanical strength when compared to other materials, such as Cordierite. However, SiC's thermal expansion ratio is greater. Therefore, the SiC-DPF is designed with 35 X 35mm segments and cement bonded construction, both of which function to relieve thermal stress. The appearance of the SiC-DPF with the segment design is shown in Figure 1. In this paper, the thermal stress mechanism of the segmented joint during soot regeneration and the influence of the cement properties on the thermal shock resistance was investigated by using the soot regeneration model and thermal stress analysis in addition to the engine test.
Technical Paper

Design Optimization of Wall Flow Type Catalyzed Cordierite Particulate Filter for Heavy Duty Diesel

2005-04-11
2005-01-0666
This paper reports on the desired performances for Catalyzed Soot Filters (Hereinafter referred as “CSF”), which is composed of a Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) coated with an Oxidation Catalyst, its design factors and their influence on DPF performance, and on the lifetime prediction method to effectively design a DPF for durability. Performance means pressure drop, Particulate Matter (PM) regeneration limit, time for light-off, and canning strength. Design factors include cell structure, overall DPF size and material porosity. Knowing the relationships between performance and design factors assist the engineer in optimizing the selection of material, cell structure and size of the DPF.
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