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Technical Paper

Investigation of an Advanced Combustion System for Stoichiometric Diesel to Reduce Soot Emissions

2019-01-15
2019-01-0023
Diesel engines are facing increased competition from gasoline engines in the light-duty and small non-road segments, primarily due to the high relative cost of emissions control systems for lean-burn diesel engines. Advancements in gasoline engine technology have decreased the operating cost advantage of diesels and the relatively high initial-cost disadvantage is now too large to sustain a strong business position. SwRI has focused several years of research efforts toward enabling diesel engine combustion systems to operate at stoichiometric conditions, which allows the application of a low-cost three-way catalyst emission control system which has been well developed for gasoline spark-ignited engines. One of the main barriers of this combustion concept is the result of high smoke emissions from poor fuel/air mixing.
Technical Paper

Detailed Characterization of Criteria Pollutant Emissions from D-EGR® Light Duty Vehicle

2016-04-05
2016-01-1006
In this study, the criteria pollutant emissions from a light duty vehicle equipped with Dedicated EGR® technology were compared with emissions from an identical production GDI vehicle without externally cooled EGR. In addition to the comparison of criteria pollutant mass emissions, an analysis of the gaseous and particulate chemistry was conducted to understand how the change in combustion system affects the optimal aftertreatment control system. Hydrocarbon emissions from the vehicle were analyzed usin g a variety of methods to quantify over 200 compounds ranging in HC chain length from C1 to C12. The particulate emissions were also characterized to quantify particulate mass and number. Gaseous and particulate emissions were sampled and analyzed from both vehicles operating on the FTP-75, HWFET, US06, and WLTP drive cycles at the engine outlet location.
Technical Paper

Diesel Catalyst Aging using a FOCAS® HGTR, a Diesel Burner System, to Simulate Engine-Based Aging

2010-04-12
2010-01-1218
The classical approach to prepare engine exhaust emissions control systems for evaluation and certification is to condition the fresh parts by aging the systems on an engine/dynamometer aging stand. For diesel systems this can be a very lengthy process since the estimated service life of the emissions control systems can be several hundred thousand miles. Thus full useful life aging can take thousands of engine bench aging hours, even at elevated temperatures, making aging a considerable cost and time investment. Compared to gasoline engines, diesel engines operate with very low exhaust gas temperatures. One of the major sources of catalyst deactivation is exposure to high temperature [ 1 ].
Technical Paper

Control System Development for Retrofit Automated Manual Transmissions

2009-12-13
2009-28-0001
For transmission suppliers tooled primarily for producing manual transmissions, retrofitting a manual transmission with actuators and a controller is business viable. It offers a low cost convenience for the consumer without losing fuel economy when compared to torque converter type automatics. For heavy duty truck fleets even the estimated 3% gain in fuel economy that the Automated Manual Transmission (AMT) offers over the manual transmission can result in lower operational costs. This paper provides a case study using a light duty transmission retrofitted with electric actuation for gears and the clutch. A high level description of the control algorithms and hardware is included. Clutch control is the most significant component of the AMT controller and it is addressed in detail during operations such as vehicle launch from rest, launch from coast and launch on grades.
Journal Article

Smooth In-Cylinder Lean-Rich Combustion Switching Control for Diesel Engine Exhaust-Treatment System Regenerations

2008-04-14
2008-01-0979
This paper describes an in-cylinder lean-rich combustion (no-post-injection for rich) switching control approach for modern diesel engines equipped with exhaust-treatment systems. No-post-injection rich combustion is desirable for regeneration of engine exhaust-treatment systems thanks to its less fuel penalty compared with regeneration approaches using post-injections and / or in-exhaust injections. However, for vehicle applications, it is desirable to have driver-transparent exhaust-treatment system regenerations, which challenge the in-cylinder rich-lean combustion transitions. In this paper, a nonlinear in-cylinder condition control system combined with in-cylinder condition guided fueling control functions were developed to achieve smooth in-cylinder lean-rich switching control at both steady-state and transient operation. The performance of the control system is evaluated on a modern light-duty diesel engine (G9T600).
Technical Paper

Investigation of Alternative Combustion, Airflow-Dominant Control and Aftertreatment System for Clean Diesel Vehicles

2007-07-23
2007-01-1937
A new diesel engine system adopting alternative combustion with rich and near rich combustion, and an airflow-dominant control system for precise combustion control was used with a 4-way catalyst system with LNT (lean NOx trap) to achieve Tier II Bin 5 on a 2.2L TDI diesel engine. The study included catalyst temperature control, NOx regeneration, desulfation, and PM oxidation with and without post injection. Using a mass-produced lean burn gasoline LNT with 60,000 mile equivalent aging, compliance to Tier II Bin 5 emissions was confirmed for the US06 and FTP75 test cycles with low NVH, minor fuel penalty and smooth transient operation.
Technical Paper

AN AIRFLOW-DOMINANT CONTROL SYSTEM FOR FUTURE DIESEL ENGINES

2007-07-23
2007-01-2070
An airflow-dominant control system was developed to provide precise engine and exhaust treatment control with low air fuel ratio alternative combustion. The main elements of the control logic include a real-time state observer for in-cylinder oxygen mass estimation, a simplified packaging scheme for all air-handling and fueling parameters, a finite state machine for control mode switching, combustion control models to maintain robust alternative combustion during transients, and smooth rich/lean switching during lean NOx trap (LNT) regeneration without post injection. The control logic was evaluated on a passenger car equipped with a 4-way catalyst system with LNT and was instrumental in achieving US Tier II Bin 5 emission targets with good drivability and low NVH.
Technical Paper

Hybrid Robust Control for Engines Running Low Temperature Combustion and Conventional Diesel Combustion Modes

2007-04-16
2007-01-0770
This paper describes a hybrid robust nonlinear control approach for modern diesel engines running low temperature combustion and conventional diesel combustion modes. Using alternative combustion modes has become a promising approach to reduce engine emissions. However, due to very different in-cylinder conditions and fueling parameters for different combustion modes, control of engines operating multiple combustion modes is very challenging. It becomes difficult for conventional calibration / mapping based approaches to produce satisfactory results in terms of engine torque responses and emissions. Advanced control techniques are then demanded to accomplish the tasks. An innovative hybrid control system is designed to track different key engine operating variables at different combustion modes as well as avoid singularity which is inherent for turbocharged diesel engines running multiple combustion modes.
Technical Paper

Long-Term Aging of NOx Sensors in Heavy-Duty Engine Exhaust

2005-10-24
2005-01-3793
Research has shown that there are many factors that affect the long-term performance of nitrogen oxides (NOx) control systems used in diesel engine applications. However, if the NOx emissions can be accurately monitored, it might be possible to restore performance by making adjustments to the control systems. This paper presents results from a study that tested the durability of 25 NOx sensors exposed to heavy-duty diesel exhaust for 6,000 hours. The study, conducted by the Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels - Diesel Emission Controls (APBF-DEC) project, tested the sensors at various locations in the exhaust stream.
Technical Paper

Electronic Fuel System Development for Air-Cooled Motorcycles

2004-09-27
2004-32-0059
Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) has developed electronic fuel injection (EFI) systems to be used on air-cooled motorcycle applications. In order to explore differences in application requirements between large and small displacement motorcycles, a large twin-cylinder, four-stroke, air-cooled motorcycle, and a small single cylinder, four-stroke, air-cooled motorcycle were utilized. The primary objectives of this study were to meet current and future emissions regulations for motorcycle exhaust emissions, to raise fuel economy, and to improve overall engine performance. The EFI development required baseline testing, control system setup, design of intake system components, installation of sensors and control unit, fuel system integration, steady-state and transient calibration, fuel consumption development, emissions development, performance improvement, and acceleration testing.
Technical Paper

The Turbo Trac Traction Drive CVT

2004-08-23
2004-40-0038
A unique and attractive variator mechanism has been developed by Turbo Trac, Inc. and Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) for initial use in a heavy duty diesel truck application. High efficiency levels have been predicted with analytical models and confirmed with actual test data. Further, this variator incorporates a very stable and simple control system and has extremely high torque capacity. The prototype of the variator mechanism has also been configured with a modified Allison 650 series transmission for use as a series application in a Peterbilt truck, the final configuration will be a split power design. The setup includes a preliminary control system that allows for highway driving. It is emphasized, however, that Allison did not contribute to this design or any of the content of this paper.
Technical Paper

Method for Analyzing Lubricating Oil Contamination of Aircraft Systems

2002-11-05
2002-01-2942
Cabin air quality is of continuing importance [1]. Contamination of air with particulates or vapors has the potential of affecting the health of passengers and flight crew. Therefore, measures are required to maintain acceptable levels of cabin air quality. One potential source of cabin air contamination is lubricating oils used in the engines. Type II oils are required for the main engines, but Type I or Type II oils can be used for the APU, with Type I recommended by some engine manufacturers for its cold-start properties. Southwest Research Institutes (SwRI®) Department of Emissions Research used an internally developed analytical method called Direct Filter Injection/Gas Chromatograph (DFI/GC™) to analyze for volatile fractions of lubricating oil contaminants on Environmental Control System (ECS) components. Samples of two standard Type II aviation turbine lubricating oils were analyzed with the DFI/GC™ method and their spectra examined.
Technical Paper

Effects of Catalyst Formulation on Vehicle Emissions With Respect to Gasoline Fuel Sulfur Level

1999-10-25
1999-01-3675
Proposed emissions standards will require that emissions control systems function at extremely high efficiency. Recently, studies have shown that elevated gasoline fuel sulfur levels (GFSL) can impair catalytic converter efficiency. In this study, a variety of tri-metal catalysts were evaluated to determine if formulation changes could reduce emissions sensitivity to GFSL. Catalysts with elemental composition similar to an OEM, but with double the precious metal (PM) loading, were evaluated using 38 and 620 ppm GFSL. Doubling the PM loading significantly reduced catalyst sensitivity to sulfur. Doubling the rhodium loading, at the expense of the platinum loading, significantly improved NOx emission sulfur sensitivity.
Technical Paper

Using Advanced Emission Control Systems to Demonstrate LEV II ULEV on Light-Duty Gasoline Vehicles

1999-03-01
1999-01-0774
A program to demonstrate the performance of advanced emission control systems in light of the California LEV II light-duty vehicle standards and the EPA's consideration of Tier II emission standards was conducted. Two passenger cars and one light-duty pick-up truck were selected for testing, modification, and emission system performance tuning. All vehicles were 1997 Federal Tier I compliant. The advanced emission control technologies evaluated in this program included advanced three-way catalysts, high cell density substrates, and advanced thermally insulated exhaust components. Using these engine-aged advanced emission control technologies and modified stock engine control strategies (control modifications were made using an ERIC computer intercept/control system), each of the three test vehicles demonstrated FTP emission levels below the proposed California LEV II 193,000 km (120,000 mile) ULEV levels.
Technical Paper

ERIC - A System to Modify Vehicle Emissions Through Computer Controlled Signal Interception

1999-03-01
1999-01-0773
A computer controlled system capable of intercepting and performing closed-loop control of a vehicle subsystem during targeted modes of operation was developed. The system has been given the acronym ERIC, for Emissions Reduction Intercept and Control system. This study was prompted by the need for the ability to modify engine controls through targeted modes of operation, without altering the majority of engine operation, to assist in the integration of exhaust aftertreatment and engine systems. The general concept and approach for applying the ERIC method, and application of the system to perform targeted, mode-activated EGR control intercept on a 1997 Ford Crown Victoria, are described in this paper. Data are presented that demonstrate how the problem mode was identified, targeted, mapped, and modified. FTP-75 test data are presented to show the impact of this particular application.
Technical Paper

Humidity Effects and Compensation in a Lean Burn Natural Gas Engine

1997-05-01
971706
The effect of humidity on the lean misfire limit and emissions from a lean burn, natural gas engine is described in this paper, along with a description of a practical humidity compensation method for incorporation into an electronic control system. Experiments to determine the effects of humidity on the lean limit and emissions are described. Humidity increases were shown to decrease the rate of combustion, reduce NOx emissions, and increase the levels of unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Data and calculations are also presented which demonstrate that increases in humidity will cause enleanment in a typical closed loop control system utilizing a universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor. A prototype system for humidity sensing and subsequent compensation based on these findings was implemented, and the system was found, through additional testing, to compensate for humidity very effectively.
Technical Paper

Model-Based Control and Cylinder-Event-Based Logic for an Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle

1997-02-24
970531
Improvements in several areas are required to convert current technology light-duty vehicles into low-emissions vehicles suitable for meeting California's Ultra-Low Emissions Vehicle (ULEV) standards. This paper discusses one of those areas, the engine and aftertreatment control system algorithms. The approach was to use model-based air and fuel flow calculations to maintain accurate air-fuel ratio control, and to interface the aftertreatment requirements with engine air-fuel ratio control during the cold- and hot-start parts of the cycle. This approach was applied to a 1993 Ford Taurus operating on Ed85 (85% denatured alcohol, 15% gasoline).
Technical Paper

Measurement of the Instantaneous Distribution of Momentum in Diesel Injection Nozzle Fuel Jets

1996-10-01
962004
Because of its dominant role in diesel engine performance and emissions, the fuel injection process has become an area of very active research and development. It is now clear that location, shape, rate of development, and mass flow distribution within each fuel jet are all important in controlling fuel air mixing, wall interactions, combustion rate, and the resulting levels of emissions. The objective of this project was to develop an instrument for measurement of the instantaneous fuel mass and momentum distribution in the jets issuing from diesel injection nozzles. The goal was to develop an instrument concept that can be used in the laboratory for fundamental measurements, as well as a quality control system for use in manufacture of the injection nozzles. The concept of the instrument is based on the measurement of the instantaneous momentum of the fuel jet as it impacts on a surface equipped with pressure sensitive elements.
Technical Paper

Development of an Electronically-Controlled Natural Gas-Fueled John Deere PowerTech 8.1 L Engine

1995-08-01
951940
Development of a state of the art, electronically controlled natural gas-fueled engine is detailed in this paper. The engine is a lean burn, turbochargedaftercooled engine controlled by a full authority electronic control system. This system controls fuel metering, spark timing, boost pressure, throttle position, and governing. The control system features closed-loop/adaptive-learn fuel control with feedback provided by a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor. The development of the engine included development of the control system and other engine components, as well as a substantial amount of steady-state and transient control system calibration work. This effort led to a final engine calibration which provides good efficiency and transient response while meeting CARB ULEV emissions levels.
Technical Paper

Cold-Start Hydrocarbon Collection for Advanced Exhaust Emission Control

1992-02-01
920847
This paper describes the findings of a laboratory effort to demonstrate improved automotive exhaust emission control with a cold-start hydrocarbon collection system. The emission control strategy developed in this study incorporated a zeolite molecular sieve in the exhaust system to collect cold-start hydrocarbons for subsequent release to an active catalytic converter. A prototype emission control system was designed and tested on a gasoline-fueled vehicle. Continuous raw exhaust emission measurements upstream and downstream of the zeolite molecular sieve revealed collection, storage, and release of cold-start hydrocarbons. Federal Test Procedure (FTP) emission results show a 35 percent reduction in hydrocarbons emitted during the cold-transient segment (Bag 1) due to adsorption by the zeolite.
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