Refine Your Search

Search Results

Viewing 1 to 8 of 8
Technical Paper

2-Stroke Engine Options for Automotive Use: A Fundamental Comparison of Different Potential Scavenging Arrangements for Medium-Duty Truck Applications

2019-01-15
2019-01-0071
The work presented here seeks to compare different means of providing scavenging systems for an automotive 2-stroke engine. It follows on from previous work solely investigating uniflow scavenging systems, and aims to provide context for the results discovered there as well as to assess the benefits of a new scavenging system: the reverse-uniflow sleeve-valve. For the study the general performance of the engine was taken to be suitable to power a medium-duty truck, and all of the concepts discussed here were compared in terms of indicated fuel consumption for the same cylinder swept volume using a one-dimensional engine simulation package. In order to investigate the sleeve-valve designs layout drawings and analysis of the Rolls-Royce Crecy-type sleeve had to be undertaken.
Technical Paper

Review of Turbocharger Mapping and 1D Modelling Inaccuracies with Specific Focus on Two-Stag Systems

2015-09-06
2015-24-2523
The adoption of two stage serial turbochargers in combination with internal combustion engines can improve the overall efficiency of powertrain systems. In conjunction with the increase of engine volumetric efficiency, two stage boosting technologies are capable of improving torque and pedal response of small displacement engines. In two stage sequential systems, high pressure (HP) and low pressure (LP) turbochargers are packaged in a way that the exhaust gases access the LP turbine after exiting the HP turbine. On the induction side, fresh air is compressed sequentially by LP and HP compressors. The former is able to deliver elevated pressure ratios, but it is not able to highly compressor low flow rates of air. The latter turbo-machine can increase charge pressure at lower mass air flow and be by-passed at high rates of air flow.
Technical Paper

Improving Heat Transfer and Reducing Mass in a Gasoline Piston Using Additive Manufacturing

2015-04-14
2015-01-0505
Pressure and temperature levels within a modern internal combustion engine cylinder have been pushing to the limits of traditional materials and design. These operative conditions are due to the stringent emission and fuel economy standards that are forcing automotive engineers to develop engines with much higher power densities. Thus, downsized, turbocharged engines are an important technology to meet the future demands on transport efficiency. It is well known that within downsized turbocharged gasoline engines, thermal management becomes a vital issue for durability and combustion stability. In order to contribute to the understanding of engine thermal management, a conjugate heat transfer analysis of a downsized gasoline piston engine has been performed. The intent was to study the design possibilities afforded by the use of the Selective Laser Melting (SLM) additive manufacturing process.
Technical Paper

Empirical Lumped-mass Approach to Modelling Heat Transfer in Automotive Turbochargers

2014-10-13
2014-01-2559
When evaluating the performance of new boosting hardware, it is a challenge to isolate the heat transfer effects inherent within measured turbine and compressor efficiencies. This work documents the construction of a lumped mass turbocharger model in the MatLab Simulink environment capable of predicting turbine and compressor metal and gas outlet temperatures based on measured or simulated inlet conditions. A production turbocharger from a representative 2.2L common rail diesel engine was instrumented to enable accurate gas and wall temperature measurements to be recorded under a variety of engine operating conditions. Initially steady-state testing was undertaken across the engine speed and load range in order that empirical Reynolds-Nusselt heat transfer relationships could be derived and incorporated into the model. Steady state model predictions were validated against further experimental data.
Technical Paper

Turbocharger Dynamic Performance Prediction by Volterra Series Model

2014-10-13
2014-01-2558
Current turbocharger models are based on characteristic maps derived from experimental measurements taken under steady conditions on dedicated gas stand facility. Under these conditions heat transfer is ignored and consequently the predictive performances of the models are compromised, particularly under the part load and dynamic operating conditions that are representative of real powertrain operations. This paper proposes to apply a dynamic mathematical model that uses a polynomial structure, the Volterra Series, for the modelling of the turbocharger system. The model is calculated directly from measured performance data using an extended least squares regression. In this way, both compressor and turbine are modelled together based on data from dynamic experiments rather than steady flow data from a gas stand. The modelling approach has been applied to dynamic data taken from a physics based model, acting as a virtual test cell.
Technical Paper

The Effects of Engine Thermal Conditions on Performance, Emissions and Fuel Consumption

2010-04-12
2010-01-0802
Engine thermal management systems (TMS) are gaining importance in engine development and calibration to achieve low fuel consumption and meet future emissions standards. To benefit from their full potential, a thorough understanding of the effects on engine behavior is necessary. Steady state tests were performed on a 2.0L direct injection diesel engine at different load points. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to conduct exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and injection timing swings at different coolant temperatures. The effect of the standard engine controller and calibration was observed during these tests. The injection timing strategy included a significant dependency on coolant temperature, retarding injection by about 3° crank angle between coolant temperatures of 70°C and 86°C. In contrast, EGR strategy was essentially independent of coolant temperature, though physical interactions were present due in part to the EGR cooler.
Journal Article

Experimental Characterisation of Heat Transfer in Exhaust Pipe Sections

2008-04-14
2008-01-0391
This paper describes the characterisation of heat transfer in a series of 11 test sections designed to represent a range of configurations seen in production exhaust systems, which is part of a larger activity aimed at the accurate modeling of heat transfer and subsequent catalyst light off in production exhaust systems comprised of similar geometries. These sections include variations in wall thickness, diameter, bend angle and radius. For each section a range of transient and steady state tests were performed on a dynamic test cell using a port injected gasoline engine. In each case a correlation between observed Reynolds number (Re) and Nusselt number (Nu) was developed. A model of the system was implemented in Matlab/Simulink in which each pipe element was split into 25 sub-elements by dividing the pipe into five both axially and radially. The modeling approach was validated using the experimental data.
Technical Paper

Predictions for Nucleate Boiling - Results From a Thermal Bench Marking Exercise Under Low Flow Conditions

2002-03-04
2002-01-1028
Two predictive methods have been applied to an IC engine cooling gallery simulator to provide benchmarking heat transfer information. The object of this work was to assess the suitability and accuracy of these methods for application to future on-engine heat transfer studies. Such studies are aimed at developing predictive tools to aid in the design of precision cooling systems. The modelling techniques of Rohsenow and Chen have been used, modified and validated. Compared against experimental data, the sub-cooled form of the Chen model has been found to be most representative for the cooling gallery simulator designed specifically to meet the requirements of this work.
X