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Technical Paper

Understanding the Role of Filtered EGR on PM Emissions

2011-08-30
2011-01-2080
In earlier work we have shown that engine operation with oxygenated fuels (e.g., biodiesel) reduces the particulate matter (PM) emissions and extends the engine tolerance to exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) before it reaches smoke limited conditions. The same result has also been reported when high cetane number fuels such as gas-to-liquid (GTL) are used. A likely mechanism for engine-out particulate growth is the reintroduction of particle nuclei into the cylinder through EGR. These recirculated PM particles serve as sites for further condensation and accumulation promoting larger and greater number of particles. In order to further our understanding of EGR influence on total PM production, a diesel particulate filter (DPF) was integrated into the EGR loop. A PM reduction of approximately 50% (soot) was achieved with diesel fuel through filtered EGR, whilst still maintaining a significant NOX reduction.
Technical Paper

Diesel Engine Performance and Emissions when First Generation Meets Next Generation Biodiesel

2009-06-15
2009-01-1935
Limits on the total future potential of biodiesel fuel due to the availability of raw materials mean that ambitious 20% fuel replacement targets will need to be met by the use of both first and next generation biodiesel fuels. The use of higher percentage biodiesel blends requires engine recalibration, as it affects engine performance, combustion patterns and emissions. Previous work has shown that the combustion of 50:50 blends of biodiesel fuels (first generation RME and next generation synthetic fuel) can give diesel fuel-like performance (i.e. in-cylinder pressure, fuel injection and heat release patterns). This means engine recalibration can be avoided, plus a reduction in all the regulated emissions. Using a 30% biodiesel blend (with different first and next generation proportions) mixed with Diesel may be a more realistic future fuel.
Technical Paper

Performance, Emissions and Exhaust-Gas Reforming of an Emulsified Fuel: A Comparative Study with Conventional Diesel Fuel

2009-06-15
2009-01-1809
The fuel reforming technology has been extensively investigated as a way to produce hydrogen on-board a vehicle that can be utilized in internal combustion engines, fuel cells and aftertreatment technologies. Maximization of H2 production in the reforming process can be achieved when there is optimized water (steam) addition for the different reforming temperatures. A way to increase the already available water quantity on-board a vehicle (i.e. exhaust gas water content) is by using emulsified fuel (e.g. water-diesel blend). This study presents the effect of an emulsified diesel fuel (a blend of water and diesel fuel with an organic surfactant to make the mixture stable) on combustion in conjunction with exhaust gas assisted fuel reforming on a compression ignition engine. No engine modification was required to carry out these tests. The emulsified diesel fuel consisted of about 80% (mass basis) of conventional ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) fuel and fixed water content.
Technical Paper

Engine Performance and Emissions from Dual Fuelled Engine with In-Cylinder Injected Diesel Fuels and In-Port Injected Bioethanol

2009-06-15
2009-01-1853
Biofuels development and specification are currently driven by the engine (mainly gasoline- and diesel-type) technology, existing fossil fuel specification and availability of feedstock. The ability to use biofuels with conventional fuels without jeopardising the standard fuel specifications is a very effective means for the implementation of these fuels. In this work the effect of dual fuelling with in-cylinder injected ULSD fuel or synthetic second generation biofuels (a Gas-To-Liquid GTL fuel as a surrogate of these biofuels as its composition, specifications and production process are very similar to second generation biofuels) and with inlet port injected bioethanol on the engine performance and emissions were investigated. The introduction of anhydrous bioethanol improved the NOx and smoke emissions, but increased total hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.
Technical Paper

Activity of Prototype Catalysts on Exhaust Emissions from Biodiesel Fuelled Engines

2008-10-06
2008-01-2514
A prototype catalyst has been developed and integrated within the aftertreatment exhaust system to control the HC, CO, PM and NOx emissions from diesel exhaust gas. The catalyst activity in removing HC and nano-particles was examined with exhaust gas from a diesel engine operating on biodiesel - Rapeseed Methyl Ester (RME). The tests were carried out at steady-state conditions for short periods of time, thus catalyst tolerance to sulphur was not examined. The prototype catalyst reduced the amount of hydrocarbons (HC) and the total PM. The quantity of particulate with electrical mobility diameter in nucleation mode size < 10nm, was significantly reduced over the catalyst. Moreover, it was observed that the use of EGR (20% vol.) for the biodiesel fuelled engine significantly increases the particle concentration in the accumulation mode with simultaneous reduction in the particle concentration in the nuclei mode.
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