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Technical Paper

Comparison of Airbag-Aggressivity Predictors in Relation to Forearm Fractures

1998-02-23
980856
Four unembalmed human cadavers were used in eight direct-forearm-airbag-interaction static deployments to assess the relative aggressivity of two different airbag modules. Instrumentation of the forearm bones included triaxial accelerometry, crack detection gages, and film targets. The forearm-fracture predictors, peak and average distal forearm speed (PDFS and ADFS), were evaluated and compared to the incidence of transverse, oblique, and wedge fractures of the radius and ulna. Internal-airbag pressure and axial column loads were also measured. The results of this study support the use of PDFS or ADFS for the prediction of airbag-induced upper-extremity fractures. The results also suggest that there is no direct relationship between internal-airbag pressure and forearm fracture. The less-aggressive system (LAS) examined in this study produced half the number of forearm fracture as the more-aggressive system (MAS), yet exhibited a more aggressive internal-pressure performance.
Technical Paper

Biomechanical Investigation of Airbag-Induced Upper-Extremity Injuries

1997-11-12
973325
The factors that influence airbag-induced upper-extremity injuries sustained by drivers were investigated in this study. Seven unembalmed human cadavers were used in nineteen direct-forearm-interaction static deployments. A single horizontal-tear-seam airbag module and two different inflators were used. Spacing between the instrumented forearm and the airbag module was varied from 10 cm to direct contact in some tests. Forearm-bone instrumentation included triaxial accelerometry, crack detection gages, and film targets. Internal airbag pressure was also measured. The observed injuries were largely transverse, oblique, and wedge fractures of the ulna or radius, or both, similar to those reported in field investigations. Tears of the elbow joint capsule were also found, both with and without fracture of the forearm.
Technical Paper

Lumbar Support in Auto Seats: Conclusions from a Study of Preferred Driving Posture

1996-02-01
960478
Prominent, longitudinally convex lumbar supports are frequently recommended for auto seats based on the assumption that such supports will induce sitters to choose postures with substantial lumbar lordosis. Lumbar lordosis has been associated with reduced spine loading as measured by pressure in the intervertebral disks. Data from a laboratory study of the influence of lumbar support on driving posture demonstrate that, on average, lumbar lordosis is not strongly affected by large increases in lumbar support prominence. These findings, and their implications for seat design, are reviewed.
Technical Paper

UMTRI Experimental Techniques in Head Injury Research

1985-06-01
851244
This paper discusses techniques developed and used by the Biosciences Group at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) for measuring three-dimensional head motion, skull bone strain, epidural pressure, and internal brain motion of repressurized cadavers and Rhesus monkeys during head impact. In the experimental design, a stationary test subject is struck by a guided moving impactor of 10 kg (monkeys) and 25 or 65 kg (cadavers). The impactor striking surface is fitted with padding to vary the contact force-time characteristics. The experimental technique uses a nine-accelerometer system rigidly affixed to the skull to measure head motion, transducers placed at specific points below the skull to record epidural pressure, repressurization of both the vascular and cerebrospinal systems, and high-speed cineradiography (at 1000 frames per second) of radiopaque targets.
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