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Technical Paper

ICICLE: A Model for Glaciated & Mixed Phase Icing for Application to Aircraft Engines

2019-06-10
2019-01-1969
High altitude ice crystals can pose a threat to aircraft engine compression and combustion systems. Cases of engine damage, surge and rollback have been recorded in recent years, believed due to ice crystals partially melting and accreting on static surfaces (stators, endwalls and ducting). The increased awareness and understanding of this phenomenon has resulted in the extension of icing certification requirements to include glaciated and mixed phase conditions. Developing semi-empirical models is a cost effective way of enabling certification, and providing simple design rules for next generation engines. A comprehensive ice crystal icing model is presented in this paper, the Ice Crystal Icing ComputationaL Environment (ICICLE). It is modular in design, comprising a baseline code consisting of an axisymmetric or 2D planar flowfield solution, Lagrangian particle tracking, air-particle heat transfer and phase change, and surface interactions (bouncing, fragmentation, sticking).
Technical Paper

Thermal Analysis of Steel and Aluminium Pistons for an HSDI Diesel Engine

2019-04-02
2019-01-0546
Chromium-molybdenum alloy steel pistons, which have been used in commercial vehicle applications for some time, have more recently been proposed as a means of improving thermal efficiency in light-duty applications. This work reports a comparison of the effects of geometrically similar aluminium and steel pistons on the combustion characteristics and energy flows on a single cylinder high-speed direct injection diesel research engine tested at two speed / load conditions (1500 rpm / 6.9 bar nIMEP and 2000 rpm/25.8 bar nIMEP) both with and without EGR. The results indicate that changing to an alloy steel piston can provide a significant benefit in brake thermal efficiency at part-load and a reduced (but non-negligible) benefit at the high-load condition and also a reduction in fuel consumption. These benefits were attributed primarily to a reduction in friction losses.
Technical Paper

Effect of Thermocouple Size on the Measurement of Exhaust Gas Temperature in Internal Combustion Engines

2018-09-10
2018-01-1765
Accurate measurement of exhaust gas temperature in internal combustion engines is essential for a wide variety of monitoring and design purposes. Typically these measurements are made with thermocouples, which may vary in size from 0.05 mm (for fast response applications) to a few millimetres. In this work, the exhaust of a single cylinder diesel engine has been instrumented both with a fast-response probe (comprising of a 50.8 μm, 127 μm and a 254 μm thermocouple) and a standard 3 mm sheathed thermocouple in order to assess the performance of these sensors at two speed/load conditions. The experimental results show that the measured time-average exhaust temperature is dependent on the sensor size, with the smaller thermocouples indicating a lower average temperature for both speed/load conditions. Subject to operating conditions, measurement discrepancies of up to ~80 K have been observed between the different thermocouples used.
Technical Paper

A Heat Transfer Model for Low Temperature Combustion Engines

2018-09-10
2018-01-1662
Low Temperature Combustion is a technology that enables achieving both a higher efficiency and simultaneously lower emissions of NOx and particulate matter. It is a noun for combustion regimes that operate with a lean air-fuel mixture and where the combustion occurs at a low temperature, such as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition and Partially Premixed Combustion. In this work a new model is proposed to predict the instantaneous heat flux in engines with Low Temperature Combustion. In-cylinder heat flux measurements were used to construct this model. The new model addresses two shortcomings of the existing heat transfer models already present during motored operation: the phasing of the instantaneous heat flux and the overprediction of the heat flux during the expansion phase. This was achieved by implementing the in-cylinder turbulence in the heat transfer model. The heat transfer during the combustion was taken into account by using the turbulence generated in the burned zone.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of Wall Heat Flux Models for Full Cycle CFD Simulation of Internal Combustion Engines under Motoring Operation

2017-09-04
2017-24-0032
The present work details a study of the heat flux through the walls of an internal combustion engine. The determination of this heat flux is an important aspect in engine optimization, as it influences the power, efficiency and the emissions of the engine. Therefore, a set of simulation tools in the OpenFOAM® software has been developed, that allows the calculation of the heat transfer through engine walls for ICEs. Normal practice in these types of engine simulations is to apply a wall function model to calculate the heat flux, rather than resolving the complete thermo-viscous boundary layer, and perform simulations of the closed engine cycle. When dealing with a complex engine, this methodology will reduce the overall computational cost. It however increases the need to rely on assumptions on both the initial flow field and the behavior in the near-wall region.
Technical Paper

Analysis of Underhood Temperature Fields using Linear Superposition

2017-03-28
2017-01-0138
The analysis of thermal fields in the underhood region is complicated by the complex geometry and the influence of a multitude of different heat sources. This complexity means that running full CFD analyses to predict the thermal field in this region is both computationally expensive and time consuming. A method of predicting the thermal field using linear superposition has been developed in order to analyse the underhood region of a simplified Formula One race car, though the technique is applicable to all vehicles. The use of linear superposition allows accurate predictions of the thermal field within a complex geometry for varying boundary conditions with negligible computational costs once the initial characterisation CFD has been run. A quarter scale, rear end model of a Formula One race car with a simplified internal assembly is considered for analysis, though the technique can also be applied to commercial and industrial vehicles.
Technical Paper

Experimental Investigation and Modelling of the In-Cylinder Heat Transfer during Ringing Combustion in an HCCI Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0732
Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines can achieve both a high thermal efficiency and near-zero emissions of NOx and soot. However, their maximum attainable load is limited by the occurrence of a ringing combustion. At high loads, the fast combustion rate gives rise to pressure oscillations in the combustion chamber accompanied by a ringing or knocking sound. In this work, it is investigated how these pressure oscillations affect the in-cylinder heat transfer and what the best approach is to model the heat transfer during ringing combustion. The heat transfer is measured with a thermopile heat flux sensor inside a CFR engine converted to HCCI operation. A variation of the mass fuel rate at different compression ratios is performed to measure the heat transfer during three different operating conditions: no, light and severe ringing. The occurrence of ringing increases both the peak heat flux and the total heat loss.
Technical Paper

Studying the Effect of the Flame Passage on the Convective Heat Transfer in a S.I. Engine

2017-03-28
2017-01-0515
Engine optimization requires a good understanding of the in-cylinder heat transfer since it affects the power output, engine efficiency and emissions of the engine. However little is known about the convective heat transfer inside the combustion chamber due to its complexity. To aid the understanding of the heat transfer phenomena in a Spark Ignition (SI) engine, accurate measurements of the local instantaneous heat flux are wanted. An improved understanding will lead to better heat transfer modelling, which will improve the accuracy of current simulation software. In this research, prototype thin film gauge (TFG) heat flux sensors are used to capture the transient in-cylinder heat flux within a Cooperative Fuel Research (CFR) engine. A two-zone temperature model is linked with the heat flux data. This allows the distinction between the convection coefficient in the unburned and burned zone.
Technical Paper

Demonstrating the Use of Thin Film Gauges for Heat Flux Measurements in ICEs: Measurements on an Inlet Valve in Motored Operation

2016-04-05
2016-01-0641
To optimize internal combustion engines (ICEs), a good understanding of engine operation is essential. The heat transfer from the working gases to the combustion chamber walls plays an important role, not only for the performance, but also for the emissions of the engine. Besides, thermal management of ICEs is becoming more and more important as an additional tool for optimizing efficiency and emission aftertreatment. In contrast little is known about the convective heat transfer inside the combustion chamber due to the complexity of the working processes. Heat transfer measurements inside the combustion chamber pose a challenge in instrumentation due to the harsh environment. Additionally, the heat loss in a spark ignition (SI) engine shows a high temporal and spatial variation. This poses certain requirements on the heat flux sensor. In this paper we examine the heat transfer in a production SI ICE through the use of Thin Film Gauge (TFG) heat flux sensors.
Technical Paper

Assessment of Empirical Heat Transfer Models for a CFR Engine Operated in HCCI Mode

2015-04-14
2015-01-1750
Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines are a promising alternative to traditional spark- and compression-ignition engines, due to their high thermal efficiency and near-zero emissions of NOx and soot. Simulation software is an essential tool in the development and optimization of these engines. The heat transfer submodel used in simulation software has a large influence on the accuracy of the simulation results, due to its significant effect on the combustion. In this work several empirical heat transfer models are assessed on their ability to accurately predict the heat flux in a CFR engine during HCCI operation. Models are investigated that are developed for traditional spark- and compression-ignition engines such as those from Annand [1], Woschni [2] and Hohenberg [3] and also models developed for HCCI engines such as those from Chang et al. [4] and Hensel et al. [5].
Journal Article

Calibration of a TFG Sensor for Heat Flux Measurements in a S.I. Engine

2015-04-14
2015-01-1645
In the development of internal combustion engines, measurements of the heat transfer to the cylinder walls play an important role. These measurements are necessary to provide data for building a model of the heat transfer, which can be used to further develop simulation tools for engine optimization. This research will focus on the Thin Film Gauge (TFG) heat flux sensor. This sensor consists of a platinum RTD (Resistance Temperature Detector) on an insulating Macor® (ceramic) substrate. The sensor has a high frequency response (up to 100 kHz) and is small and robust. These properties make the TFG sensor adequate for measurements in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. To use this sensor, its thermal properties - namely the temperature sensitivity coefficient and the thermal product - must be correctly calibrated. First, different calibration setups with a different temperature range are used to calibrate the temperature sensitivity coefficient of the TFG sensor.
Technical Paper

Evaluation of a Flow-Field-Based Heat Transfer Model for Premixed Spark-Ignition Engines on Hydrogen

2013-04-08
2013-01-0225
Hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion engines are an attractive alternative to current drive trains, because a high efficiency is possible throughout the load range and only emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) can be emitted. The latter is an important constraint for power and efficiency optimization. Optimizing the engine with experiments is time consuming, so thermodynamic models of the engine cycle are being developed to speed up this process. Such a model has to accurately predict the heat transfer in the engine, because it affects all optimization targets. The standard heat transfer models (Annand and Woschni) have already been cited to be inaccurate for hydrogen engines. However, little work has been devoted to the evaluation of the flow-field based heat transfer model, which is the topic of this paper. The model is evaluated with measurements that focus on the effect of the fuel, under motored and fired operation.
Technical Paper

Development and Validation of a Knock Prediction Model for Methanol-Fuelled SI Engines

2013-04-08
2013-01-1312
Knock is one of the main factors limiting the efficiency of spark-ignition engines. The introduction of alternative fuels with elevated knock resistance could help to mitigate knock concerns. Alcohols are prime candidate fuels and a model that can accurately predict their autoignition behavior under varying engine operating conditions would be of great value to engine designers. The current work aims to develop such a model for neat methanol. First, an autoignition delay time correlation is developed based on chemical kinetics calculations. Subsequently, this correlation is used in a knock integral model that is implemented in a two-zone engine code. The predictive performance of the resulting model is validated through comparison against experimental measurements on a CFR engine for a range of compression ratios, loads, ignition timings and equivalence ratios.
Journal Article

Applying Design of Experiments to Determine the Effect of Gas Properties on In-Cylinder Heat Flux in a Motored SI Engine

2012-04-16
2012-01-1209
Models for the convective heat transfer from the combustion gases to the walls inside a spark ignition engine are an important keystone in the simulation tools which are being developed to aid engine optimization. The existing models have, however, been cited to be inaccurate for hydrogen, one of the alternative fuels currently investigated. One possible explanation for this inaccuracy is that the models do not adequately capture the effect of the gas properties. These have never been varied in a wide range because air and ‘classical’ fossil fuels have similar values, but they are significantly different in the case of hydrogen. As a first step towards a fuel independent heat transfer model, we have investigated the effect of the gas properties on the heat flux in a spark ignition engine.
Technical Paper

Burn Rate and Instantaneous Heat Flux Study of Iso-octane, Toluene and Gasoline in a Spray-Guided Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition Engine

2008-04-14
2008-01-0469
The burn rate and the instantaneous in-cylinder heat transfer have been studied experimentally in a spray-guided direct-injection spark-ignition engine with three different fuels: gasoline, iso-octane and toluene. The effects of the ignition timing, air fuel ratio, fuel injection timing and injection strategy (direct injection or port injection) on the burn rate and the in-cylinder heat transfer have been experimentally investigated at a standard mapping point (1500 rpm and 0.521 bar MAP) with the three different fuels. The burn rate analysis was deduced from the in-cylinder pressure measurement. A two-dimensional heat conduction model of the thermocouple was used to calculate the heat flux from the measured surface temperature. An engine thermodynamic simulation code was used to predict the gas-to-wall heat transfer.
Technical Paper

Temperature and Heat Flux Measurements in a Spark Ignition Engine

2000-03-06
2000-01-1214
This paper has two parts. The first compares the measured burned gas temperature using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) with the predictions of a multiple zone computer simulation of combustion. The second part describes a system that is capable of determining the heat flux into the combustion chamber by means of measuring the chamber surface temperature. It is shown that the multi-zone computer simulation can accurately predict the burned gas temperature once the fuel burn rate has been analyzed and the model tuned correctly. The effect of different fuels (methane and iso-octane) on the burned gas temperature is reported. A high burn rate or more advanced ignition timing gave a lower burned gas temperature towards the end of the engine cycle. The surface heat flux was deduced from measurements of the surface temperature by using a finite difference method.
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